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SEVENTY-SEVENTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

OF MARYLAND 



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LIBRARY— COLLEGE PARK 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/report00mary_71 



STATE OF MARYLAND 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Seventy-seventh Annual Report 

OF THE 

State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 
OF THE 

Public Schools of Maryland 

FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING JULY 3L 1943 




BALTIMORE, MD. 



STATE OF MARYLAND 
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION— OCTOBER, 1943 

Name Address Name Address 

TASKER G. LOWNDES, Pres Cumberland NICHOLAS OREM Hyattsville 

WENDELL D. ALLEN, Vice-Pres.. Baltimore MRS. ALVIN THALHEIMER Baltimore 

HARRY Y. GEORGE Brunswick HENRY C. WHITEFORD Whiteford 

HORACE M. MORGAN Queen Anne 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer, Catonsville 

OFFICE OF THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

1111 Lexington Building, Baltimore -1, Md. 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr State Superintendent of Schools 

JOHN J. SEIDEL (on leave) Assistant State Superintendent for Vocational Education 

E. CLARKE FONTAINE (Chestertown) Supervisor of High Schools 

JAMES E. SPITZNAS (Cumberland) Supervisor of High Schools 

EARLE T. HAWKINS Supervisor of High Schools 

WILBUR DEVILBISS (College Park) Supervisor of High Schools 

GRACE L. ALDER Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

J. WALTER HUFFINGTON Supervisor of Colored Schools 

GLEN D. BROWN Acting Director of Vocational Education 

ELISABETH AMERY Supervisor of Home Economics 

H. F. COTTERMAN (College Park) 'Supervisor of Agriculture 

R. FLOYD CROMWELL Supervisor of Educational and Vocational Guidance 

DAVID W. ZIMMERMAN Supervisor of Special Education 

R. C. THOMPSON (1112 Lexington Building) Director of Vocational Rehabilitation 

THOMAS D. BRAUN (1112 Lexington Building) Case Work Rehabilitation Supervisor 

RUTH F. RING (1112 Lexington Building) Rehabilitation Assistant 

MERL D. MYERS (Easton) Rehabilitation Assistant 

MYRTLE E. CHELL (1112 Lexington Building) Rehabilitation Assistant 

DONALD I. MINNEGAN *Acting Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation 

ETHEL E. SAMMIS Assistant Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation 

ADELENE PRATT (400 Cathedral St.) State Director of Public Libraries 

BESSIE C. STERN (1114 Lexington Bldg.) Director of Bureau of Educational Measurements 

MERLE S. BATEMAN Director of Teacher Certification and Editor of Publications 

GRACE STEELE TRAVERS Principal Account Clerk No. 1 

E. SUE WALTER Clerk 

RUTH E. HOBBS Stenographer-Secretary 

ELIZABETH McGINNITY Stenographer-Secretary 

C. ELIZABETH O WINGS Stenographer-Secretary 

ELSIE F. FORMAN Stenographer-Secretary 

E. DRUSILLA CHAIRS Senior Stenographer 

CARRYE HAMBURGER Senior Stenographer 

BLANCHE E. KEEN (1112 Lexington L'uilding> Principal Account Clerk No. 2 

M. ELEANOR RICE (1114 Lexington Building) Statistical Assistant 

JANE EDELEN (1114 Lexington Building) Statistical Assistant 

DOROTHY S. RICE (1114 Lexington Building) Senior Clerk 

EMMA E. LUECKERT (1112 Lexington Building) Stenographer-Secretary 

BETTY V. YARRISON (1112 Lexington Building) Junior Stenographer 

PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

M. THERESA WIEDEFELD, President State Teachers College. Towson 

JOHN L. DUNKLE, President State Teachers College, Frostburg 

J. D. BLACKWELL, President State Teachers College, Salisbury 

WILIAM E. HENRY, Prudent State Teachen. College (For Colored Youth), Bowie 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

911 Lexington Building, Baltimore - 1, Md. 

HOOPER S. MILES State Treasurer and Chairman 

J. MILLARD TAWES .-...State Comptroller 

THOMAS G. PULLEN, Jr State Superintendent of Schools 

EDWIN W. BROOME Superintendent of Montgomery County Schools, Vice-Chairman 

ALTHEA FULLER Principal, Allegany County 

THOMAS I. HAYS Secretary 

MINNIE M. HAMILTON Stenographer-Secretary 

HELEN KIRKMAN Senior Clerk 



• Part-time 



DEC 9 1944 GIFT ^ 



MARYLAND COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS AND SUPERVISORS 

1943-44 



County Address 
ALLEGANY— Cumberland 
Charles L. Kopp, Supt. 
Lillian Compton, Asst. Supt. 
Jane Botsford 
Winifred Greene 
Mildred Willison 
Helen Sandfort (Art) 
Richard T. Rizer (High School) 

ANNE ARUNDEL— Annapolis 
Geo. Fox, Supt. 
Ruth Parker Eason 
Margaret Laws 

Howard A. Kinhart (High School) 

BALTIMORE— Towson 
C. G. Cooper, Supt. 
Edwardi G. Stapleton, Asst. Supt. 
M. Lucetta Sisk (Curriculum) 1 
Viola K. Almony 1 
Myrtle Eckhardt 1 
Jennie E. Jessop 1 
C. James Velie (Music) 1 
Olive Jobes (Art) 1 
•Herbert R. Steiner (Physical Ed.) 

CALVERT— Prince Frederick 
Harry R. Hughes, Supt. 
Mattie V. Hardesty 

CAROLINE— Denton 

W. Stewart Fitzgerald, Supt. 

A. May Thompson 

CARROLL— Westminster 
Raymond S. Hyson, Supt. 
Ruth DeVore 
Charles E. Reck 

Samuel M. Jenness (High School) 

CECIL— Elkton 

H. E. McBride, Supt. 
Olive L. Reynolds 

CHARLES— La Plata 

F. Bernard Gwynn, Supt. 

B. Lucile Bowie 

DORCHESTER— Cambridge 
W. Theodore Boston, Supt. 
Evelyn E. Johnson 

FREDERICK— Frederick 
E. W. Pruitt, Supt. 
L. Louise Freeman Thompson 
A. Drucilla Worthington 

GARRETT— Oakland 

Franklin E. Rathbun, Supt. 
Kate Bannatyne 2 
Caroline Wilson 



* Part time 

1 200 W. Saratoga St., Balto. 

2 Grantsville 



County Address 
HARFORD— Bel Air 

C. Milton Wright, Supt. 
Benjamin S. Carroll, Asst. Supt. 
Hazel L. Fisher 
Mary L. Grau 3 

HOWARD— Ellicott City 
H. C. Brown, Supt. 
Gail W. Chadwick 

KENT— Chestertown 

Louis C. Robinson, Supt. 
Mildred Hoyle 

MONTGOMERY— Rockville 
E. W. Broome, Supt. 
Ruth S. Gue 
Josephine T. Hartman 
Elizabeth Meany 
Lucille Johnson (Music) 
Marjorie Billows (Art) 
Fern D. Schneider (High School) 

PRINCE GEORGE'S— Upper Marlboro 
G. Gardner Shugart, Supt. 
William M. Brish, Asst. Supt. 
Rowannetta S. Allen 
G. Russell Hull 
Maude Gibbs Hyle 
Mary Kemp 4 
Catherine T. Reed 

QUEEN ANNE'S— Centreville 
Franklin D. Day, Supt. 
Tempe H. Dameron 

ST. MARY'S — Leonardtown 
Lettie M. Dent, Supt. 
E. Violette Young 

SOMERSET— Princess Anne 
C. Allen Carlson, Supt. 
Alice Mae Coulbourn 

TALBOT— Easton 

J. Willard Davis, Supt. 
M. Lillian Cheezum 

WASHINGTON— Hagerstown 
B. C. Willis, Supt. 
Pauline Blackford 
Katherine L. Healy 
Anne Richardson 
Mary Helen Chrissinger (Art) 
Miriam L. Hoffman (Music) 

WICOMICO— Salisbury 

James M. Bennett, Supt. 
Leah M. Phillips 

WORCESTER— Snow Hill 

Arthur C. Humphreys, Supt. 
Elizabeth A. Mundy 

3 Havre de Grace 
* Hyattsville 



108390 



CONTENTS 

Pace 

Letter of Transmittal 5 

The State Public School Budgets for 1943, 1944 and 1945 7 

1943 Legislation Affecting Education 8 

The 1942 Maryland School Census 19 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools and Length of Session 24 

Enrollment in Public and Non-Public Schools, Birth Rates, Ratio of High 

School to Total Enrollment 25 

Percent and Index of Attendance 30 

Grade Enrollment, Elementary Graduates and Non-Promotions 34 

Education for Handicapped Children in Counties and City 46 

High School Graduates: Number, Persistence and Occupations 49 

High School Enrollment by Year and Subject 58 

Participation of White High School Pupils in Music Activities 67 

High School Failures and Withdrawals 68 

Teachers by Subject, Clerks, Certification, Resignations, Turnover, Sex, 

Summer School Attendance 71 

Number Belonging and Average Salary per Teacher: 85 

Number and Size of Schools 97 

Summer Schools, Evening Schools, Adult Education, Vocational Rehabili- 
tation, Vocational Training for War Production 103 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

Total, Percent from State, Distribution of School Tax Dollar Ill 

Cost per Pupil 117 

Financing the Vocational Education Program 128 

The Adult Education Program 131 

Transportation of Pupils 133 

Capital Outlay, Bonds Outstanding, Value of School Property 138 

1943-44 County Levies; Percent of Levies Used for Schools; Assess- 
ments; Tax Rates 142 

Parent-Teacher Associations; Other than Public Funds 147 

State and County School Administration and Supervision 147 

The Maryland State Teachers Colleges — Towson, Frostburg, Salisbury ... 182 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 190 

The Maryland Public Library Commission Aid to School Libraries 191 

The State and County Health Program for School Children 194 

Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 196 

Index 238 



4 



Baltimore, Md., September 1, 1944 



Honorable Herbert R. O'Conor, 

Governor of Maryland, 
Annapolis, Maryland. 

Dear Governor 0' Conor: 

In accordance with Section 24 of Article 77 of the Laws of 
Maryland, the seventy-seventh "annual report, covering all op- 
erations of the State Department of Education and the support, 
condition, progress, and needs of education throughout the State" 
for the school year ending in June, 1943, is herewith presented 
to you. 

Continuing the policy during the emergency created by war 
conditions of eliminating or limiting State Reports to the most 
important and essential data, an abbreviated report similar to 
the one issued for the last two years omitting the verbal analy- 
sis of information included in tables or charts has been prepared. 

The war emergency has affected the schools unfavorably 
because of the great loss of teachers — three times the number 
in normal years. Due to draft or enlistment, the lure of patri- 
otic work for the government or industry with monetary returns 
far higher than those paid Maryland teachers, or the desire of 
married teachers to be with, their husbands stationed at camps 
and colleges in this country, and many other reasons, a number 
of teachers have resigned from their positions and left their 
classes to be taught in many cases by untrained and unqualified 
teachers or substitutes. The 1943 Legislature provided for State 
payments of $20.00 per month additional to teachers receiving 
salaries of less than $3,000.00 in service from July 1943 through 
April 1944, and made available $27.00 p er teacher to any local 
unit which between September, 1942 and January, 1945 would 
have paid teachers S140.00 more than the amount required by 
the regular county salary schedule. Fourteen of the twenty- 
three counties realizing the bad effects on their school systems 
of the continued withdrawal of teachers, with the aid of their 
county commissioners had already increased the salary normally 
offered teachers by amounts varying from $50.00 to §200.00 dur- 
ing the school year 1942-43. Other counties did likewise the 
following year. 



5 



Not only have teachers left their classrooms, but the stu- 
dents training to become teachers have deserted the campuses 
for highly paid positions for which special college training was 
not required. The number enrolled in 1942-43 at Towson, Frost- 
burg and Salisbury was 638 compared with 1013 five years before 
in 1938-39. These colleges accelerated their programs and per- 
mitted seniors to become cadets in the county schools in Feb- 
ruary 1943 before receiving their degrees after summer school 
study in August 1943. Still the number of students training 
for teaching is woefully short of the number of vacant positions. 

The children are those who will suffer from this situation. 
It is not difficult to visualize conditions in classrooms put in 
charge of a series of substitutes, many incapable of coping with 
the situation. When called on to give more efficient instruction 
in mathematics, science, English, physical fitness, the social 
studies, business, agriculture, home economics and industrial 
work, the schools are asked to do it with fewer and less well pre- 
pared teachers. However, those well trained experienced teach- 
ers who appreciate the importance of education in the war emer- 
gency and post-war world are worthy of the highest praise for 
the work they are doing under most difficult conditions. This 
report shows that most of the schools are carrying on and doing 
good work even under adverse conditions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 

Secretary Treasurer. 



State Board of Education. 
Tasker G. Lowndes, President 
Wendell D. Allen, Vice-President 
Harry Y. George 
Horace M. Morgan 
Nicholas Orem 
Fannie Thalheimer 
Henry C. Whiteford 



6 



TABLE 1— The State Public School Budgets for 1943, 1944 and 1945 



Purpose 



Item 



Retirement System: 

1 County Teachers 

2 Baltimore City Teachers 

3 Expense Fund 

Sub Total (Items 1-3) 

Aid to Counties and Baltimore City: 

4 High School Aid 

5 Colored Industrial Fund 

6 Part Payment of Salaries 

7 Books and Materials 

8 Fund Distributed on Basis of Census and 

Attendance 

9 Equalization Fund 

9a Equalization Colored Teachers' Salaries . . . 

10 Reduction of County Taxation, Basis 1940 

Federal Census 

11 Education of Handicapped Children 

13 Adult Education — Night Schools 

Sub Total (Items 4-11, 13) 

State Board, State Dept. and Allied Activities 

12 State Board of Education Expenses 

14 Vocational Education 

15 Physical Education and Recreation 

16 Bureau of Educational Measurements. 

17 Publications and Printing 

18 Medical Examinations of Teachers 

19 Vocational Rehabilitation 

20 Consultant Architect 

21 Equivalence Examinations 

22 State Department of Education 

Sub Total (Items 12, 14-22) 

State Teachers Colleges: 

23 Bowie State Teachers College 

24 Frostburg State Teachers College 

25 Salisbury State Teachers College 

26 Towson State Teachers College 

Sub Total (Items 23-26) 

Grand Total Including Fees 

Fees — State Teachers Colleges 

Total from State 



Appropriations 



1943 


1944 


1945 


*$626 670 
564,897 
10,598 


*$690,890 
603,011 
13,500 


*$739,196 
639,615 
13 , 500 


$1,202,165 


$1,307,401 


$1,392,311 


616,876 
26,250 
194,400 
250,000 


616,312 
24,750 
187,593 
250,000 


619,912 
24,750 
188,593 
250,000 


1,800,000 
1,711,1971 
190,000 f 


1,800,000 
2,178,994 


1,800,000 
2,366,799 


1,250,000 
24,500 
10,000 


1,250,000 
25,000 
20,000 


1,250,000 
25,000 
20,000 


$6,073,223 


$6,352,649 


$6,545,054 


1,100 
11,750 
18,050 
9,600 
4,500 
1,700 
25,850 
750 

60,674 


1,100 
12,085 
18,620 
12,000 

2,500 

2,500 
25,734 
750 

1,000 
61,085 


1,100 
12,156 
18,710 
12,158 

2,500 

2,500 
25,808 
750 

1,000 
61,298 




<MQ7 


<pio i j you 


a66,025 
b85,380 
c94,772 
d226,209 


a81,445 
b90,890 
c97,392 
d226,849 


a82,722 
b91,300 
c97,740 
d228,135 


abcd$472,386 


abcd$496,576 


abcd$499,897 


$7,881,748 
186,840 


$8,294,000 
136,681 


$8,575,242 
137,702 


$7,694,908 


$8,157,319 


$8,437,540 



Bonus Payments (Chapter 739, Laws of 1943) : 

Teachers, supervisors and attendance officers Counties and 

Baltimore City 

State Department and allied activities clerical staffs 

Teachers Colleges 

$27 payments per teacher 

Includes fees at State Teachers Colleges as follows: 



a Bowie. . . . 
b Frostburg. 
c Salisbury, 
d Towson . . . 



$25,000 
37,200 
42,240 
82,400 



$1,664,621 
2,565 
18,129 
189,054 



$24,276 
23,524 
29,007 
59,274 



33,642 



$24,635 
23,611 
29,261 
60,195 



* Includes State contribution to the Retirement System for Library Commission, Program of 
Vocational Training for War Production, Maryland Training Schools for Boys and Colored Girls, 
Montrose School for Girls, Rosewood State Training School and Maryland School for the Deaf, but 
excludes the following amounts: Forests and Parks $2,217 (1944), $2,371 (1945); Weather $79 (1944), 
$85 (1945); Morgan State College $3,964 (1944), $4,249 (1945). 



7 



8 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



THE STATE PUBLIC SCHOOL BUDGET 

Ch. 710, S. B. 126 

The State Public School Budget provides f or State appropri- 
ations totalling §8,157,319 in 1943-44 and §8,437,540 in 1944-45. 
The 1943-44 appropriation is an increase of $462,411 over the 
amount appropriated for 1942-43 and the increase for 1944-45 
over 1943-44 is §280,221. There was a reversion to the State 
Treasury of §328,765 for 1942-43. Figures for 1944 are exclusive 
of approximately §1,900,000 available in 1943-45 because of the 
emergency for adjustment of salaries of teachers earning less 
than §3,000 who are eligible to receive ten monthly payments 
of 820 beginning August 1, 1943 and ending May 1, 1944. (See 
Table 1.) 

The major increases in the State School Budget make avail- 
able additional funds for the retirement system on account of 
teachers totalling §105,236 in 1943-44 and §84,910 in 1944-45; 
and for the Equalization Fund which shows an increase of S277,- 
797 in 1943-44, and of §187,805 in 1944-45. The increments for 
experience and additional training required by the 1939 and 1941 
teachers' salary legislation and for the equalization of salaries 
of colored teachers are provided for in the Equalization Fund, 
the latter for the first time, and are mainly responsible for the 
increase in this fund. (See Table 1.) 

Ch. 668, H. B. 766 

Provides $7,000 for general repairs at Salisbury State Teachers Col- 
lege by use of unissued bonds. See new section added to Chapter 854 of 
the Acts of 1941. 



MARYLAND 1943 LEGISLATION WHICH AFFECTS EDUCATION 
General Legislation 

Ch. 739, S. B. 147 

Teachers receiving salaries of less than $3,000 shall receive from State 
funds because of the emergency ten monthly payments of $20 or so much 
as will bring their payments to amounts not exceeding $3,000 during em- 
ployment between July 1, 1943 and April 30, 1944. 

The county commissioners of any county which has paid each teacher 
$140 or more in excess of the minimum State salary schedule between 
July I, 1942 and January 1, 1945 shall receive reimbursement from the 
State of $27 for each such teacher. These additional payments shall not 
be liable for any contributions to any retirement system. 

Ch. 79, S. B. 79 

Subsections (12) and (13) are added to Section 88, Article 77, on cer- 
tification of teachers: 

(12) The State Superintendent of Schools may under rules and regu- 
lations adopted by the State Board of Education, issue other certificates 
not provided for in Section 88 if in his discretion there be need for such 
certificates. 



State School Budget; 1943 Educational Legislation 9 

(13) The State Board of Education may in its discretion, during the 
war emergency, issue war emergency teachers' certificates corresponding 
with regular certificates required or authorized, and such emergency cer- 
tificates shall be valid for such period as the State Board of Education 
may, in its discretion, determine, and shall have the same legal value and 
status as the regularly issued certificates, except that the holders thereof 
shall not be entitled to the privileges of membership in the State Teachers' 
Retirement System. 

Ch. 947, S. B. 590 

All employment of teachers in the public schools, under the authority 
of the formal and informal action regarding war emergency teachers' 
certificates of the State Department of Education is ratified and confirmed 
during the present war and for six months thereafter. 

The State Department of Education may waive the provisions of Sec- 
tion 156 of Article 77 pertaining to the holding of teachers' institutes and 
relating to the requirement as to the attendance of teachers at summer 
schools during the present war and for six months thereafter. 



Ch. 100, S. B. 100 

Section 197 A of Article 77 authorizes the State Board of Education 
to accept any Federal appropriations which may hereafter be made for 
educational purposes and constitutes the State Board of Education as the 
educational authority for their expenditure and administration. The State 
Treasurer is authorized upon warrant of the State Comptroller to receive 
and provide prefper custody of such funds and to make disbursements 
therefrom on the order of the State Board of Education. 



Ch. 787, S. B. 340 

The following sentence is added to Section 79 of Article 77: Provided, 
however, that no school shall lose a teacher until the average attendance 
falls below thirty-five children in a two-teacher school; below seventy 
children in a three-teacher school; or below one hundred and five children 
in a four-teacher school. 

Ch. 508, H. B. 346 

The date for making up financial reports is changed in Section 84 of 
Article 77 from July 31 to June 30. In the beginning of paragraph 2, 
the words "The months of July and August shall be vacation throughout 
the whole State and" have been eliminated. 



Ch. 81, S. B. 99 

By amending Section 191 A of Article 77 a member of the armed forces 
17 years old or over who has not obtained a high school certificate or 
diploma may obtain an equivalent certificate if he applies to the State 
Board of Education for an examination to be furnished to his Commanding 
Officer and to be given by the appropriate Service Officer under the regu- 
lations and conditions prescribed by the State Board of Education. High 
school subjects may be construed to mean separate examinations in the 
various subjects or comprehensive examinations, and equivalent fees may 
be charged for such comprehensive examinations. Credits for graduation 
shall be granted for passing an examination or for attendance at an ap- 
proved high school or approved institution of higher learning. 



10 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



Ch. 333, S. B. 212 

Any person who has left or leaves a position other than a temporary 
position in Maryland to enter the armed forces for active duty or service 
shall (1) if he receives a certificate of satisfactory completion of such duty, 
(2) if he is still qualified to perform the duties of such position, and (3) 
if he makes application for reemployment within 40 days after he is re- 
lieved from such active duty, be restored to his previous position, status 
and pay. Upon reinstatement he shall receive credit for his experience 
in the armed services. Sections 94-96 of Article 65 are repealed and re- 
placed by Sections 94 and 95. 

During 1 absence in the armed services, such a person or his estate 
shall not be entitled to ordinary or accidental disability benefits, death bene- 
fits, or optional allowances from the Maryland Teachers' Retirement System. 
Any such person shall have the right during such absence to make his 
customary individual contributions to the Retirement System, or such con- 
tributions may be made for him on his behalf. Such a person during such 
absence shall retain his status and rights as a member of the Retirement 
System (a) if he does not withdraw any part of his accumulated contribu- 
tions, and (b) if within one year from the time he is relieved from active 
duty or service, he shall again be actively employed by the Board of Edu- 
cation which employed him prior to his entrance into the armed services, 
(c) if he shall not have previously taken any other employment. If a person 
meeting these restrictions is reemployed within one year after b^ing re- 
lieved from active duty he shall receive credit for membership service for 
the period of his absence, provided that within a reasonable period after 
his reemployment he makes up the contributions as if he had not been 
absent and had been employed for the period of his absence at the same 
rate of pay as when he entered active service. « 

During such absence the State shall make its contribution on behalf 
of such employee as it would have had he not been absent and had re- 
tained his status as an employee during the period of his absence. Such 
person, however, shall have no right to withdraw any part of any such 
contribution made by the State. 

Ch. 721, S. B. 334 

Section 241 A of Article 77 is repealed and reenacted to read: "The 
University of Maryland shall educate in its under-graduate departments 
at College Park, free of charge for tuition, three students from each legis- 
lative district in Baltimore City and three from each county of the State; 
and these students shall be appointed by the State Senators of the respec- 
tive legislative districts and counties." 

Ch. 1007, H. B. 156 

The amended motor vehicle law defines a school bus as transporting 
teachers as well as children. It places restrictions on drivers as to age, 
driving experience, character, which, however, may be waived as to drivers 
of school buses if the public safety will not be jeopardized. The Special 
chauffeur's license shall contain a photograph, and every chauffeur shall 
display a badge. The Department of Motor Vehicles is empowered to 
adopt rules relating to mirrors, brakes and mechanical safety equipment. 
The existing requirements that vehicles must stop upon meeting or over- 
taking a school bus apply to the school bus receiving or discharging not 
only school children but also school teachers. See Article 66 Section 2, 
subsection 2. sub-subsection (49); Section 81; Section 88; Section 198; Sec- 
tion 200A; Section 201. 



Maryland Legislation Affecting Education 



11 



Ch. 144, H. B. 65 

The time is extended to June 1, 1945, during which bonds may be issued 
by the counties and municipalities to secure the benefits of any agency of 
the Federal Government engaged in a works program, to encourage or 
aid in the construction or acquisition of public works, and of those made 
necessary by and connected with the prosecution of the war, to reduce 
unemployment and thereby assist in the national recovery and promote 
the public welfare. (See Section 20 of Article 31.) 

Ch. 23 and 24, S. B. 47 and 49 

The provision permitting "the county superintendent of schools in which 
a child resides" to issue employment certificates is eliminated. Such is- 
suance is limited to the Commissioner (of Labor and Statistics) or some 
person designated in writing by said Commissioner. The physician who 
signs certificates of physical examination shall be appointed by the Com- 
missioner (of Labor and Statistics) instead of by "the officer authorized 
to issue such employment certificates." The fee paid physicians is increased 
from one dollar to two dollars, and the words "on the warrant of the 
county superintendent of schools" are eliminated. (See Sections 13, 14, 
16, 20 of Article 100.) 

Ch. 797, S. B. 365 

The State Department of Public Welfare is given supervision over all 
public and private institutions having the care, custody or control of de- 
pendent, delinquent, abandoned or neglected children, viz.: The Maryland 
Training School for Boys, Montrose, Cheltenham and the Training School 
for Colored Girls. There shall be a Bureau of Child Welfare in the State 
Department of Public Welfare having responsibility for insuring proper 
standards of child care for all children in need thereof. 

Section 142 of Article 41 is repealed and Section 32A is added to 
Article 77 reading as follows: 

32A. The State Superintendent of Schools shall exercise general 
supervision over the Maryland School for the Deaf to the same extent 
as before the passage of this Act, and shall lend such aid to the training 
schools under the supervision of the Department of Public Welfare as may 
be necessary to enable it to formulate appropriate courses of study therein, 
and to make such courses coincide, so far as practicable, with standards 
required in the public schools of this State. 

Section 20A of Article 59 provides that Rosewood State Training School 
shall operate under the direction and control of the Board of Mental Hy- 
giene which shall control all policies of admission, transfer and discharge 
of patients so that increased facilities may be made available for defective 
children in the State. The Board of Mental Hygiene shall undertake a 
joint study with the Department of Public Welfare to develop an adequate 
program to insure proper care of all feeble minded children and adults 
throughout the State, and also of all psychotic, psychopathic and epileptic 
children. 

The Board of Public Works is hereby authorized and empowered, as 
soon as conditions permit, and to the extent that funds may be set aside 
for the purpose in a capital account in the Budget, to proceed with the 
acquisition of appropriate sites, and the construction and equipment of 
the following institutions: 

(a) a new. training school for non-defective colored juvenile delinquents 
to replace Cheltenham, which shall be used for defective colored juvenile 
delinquents. 



12 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



(b) a place for defective white adults. 

(c) a place for incorrigible offenders, both white and colored between 
ages of 16 and 20. 

Ch. 818, S. B. 416 

Juvenile court procedure in Baltimore City is changed, but very few 
modifications affecting court procedure for county children are made. How- 
ever, Section 460' of Article 27 is amended to read as follows: 

Minors sixteen years of age and under eighteen years of age in Balti- 
more City, and minors under the age of eighteen years elsewhere in the 
State, upon conviction of any offenses punishable by imprisonment, may, 
in the discretion of the court or justice of the peace, instead of imprison- 
ment in the place provided for in the case of offenders generally, be com- 
mitted to any public or private institution or agency, as now or hereafter 
provided by law. 

Ch. 782, S. B. 309 

Every classified employee in the State service shall receive as vacation 
in each calendar year 15 working days, but any employee using less than 
the full vacation leave allowed beginning January 1, 1942, shall be entitled 
to have such unused leave accumulated up to 30 working days which shall 
be available for vacation leave at any time with the approval of the head 
of the department. In addition to vacation leave with pay any employee 
shall be entitled to sick leave with pay not in excess of 30 working days 
in any calendar year; provided that if any employee in any calendar year 
uses less than the full amount of sick leave allowable such unused leave 
shall be accumulated up to 100 working days and shall be available to such 
employee for sick leave at any time. Any employee using 3 or more con- 
secutive days sick' leave in any 30 day period shall present a certificate 
from a physician before receiving any pay for the period of such absence. 
(See Section 22 of Article 64 A.) 

Ch. 872, S. B. 491 

State departments shall file copies of rules and regulations adopted 
with the Clerk of the Court of Appeals and with the Department of Legis- 
lative Reference. No rule or regulation hereafter adopted shall be effective 
until after compliance with this section. Any rule or regulation filed with 
the Clerk of the Court of Appeals upon his certification shall be admissible 
as evidence in any court proceeding. Section 7 IB of Article 48 A is repealed. 
(See Section 7A of Article 41.) 

Ch. 952, S. B. 595 

Any department or agency of the State with the approval of the Board 
of Public Works or the governing body of any political subdivision of the 
State is authorized to sell or lease surplus inventories of personal property 
during the continuance of the war, when it is deemed in the public interest. 



Ch. 318, H. B. 457 

Any State department may with certain restrictions and subject to the 
approval of the Board of Public Works sell, lease, transfer, exchange, grant 
or otherwise dispose of real and personal property, and grant and con- 
vey rights of way or other easements in or over such property to the United 
States or any agency thereof or any other State board or department. 
(See Section 8 of Article 78A.) 



Maryland Legislation Affecting Education 



13 



Ch. 78, S. B. 70 

The investment of unexpended or surplus funds of the State, counties 
and cities, and of county school boards, and of trustees and other persons 
in charge of pension and retirement systems, in bonds and other obligations 
of the United States, and their sale is authorized. The interest or income 
from these investments may itself be invested, except that if the proceeds 
of bond issues are so invested, payment of interest on the bonds may be 
paid from the interest or income of these investments. Investments made 
may be retained until such time as the investor shall decide otherwise. 



Ch. 981, H. B. 498 

A Commission on Post-War Reconstruction and Development is created 
to order and direct the preparation of plans and specifications for public 
works and projects, to prepare plans for the reemployment and readjust- 
ment of service men and women on their release from the armed forces. 
One of its duties shall be the preparation and maintenance of current 
progress information on the planning and design of post-war projects of 
State agencies and counties, and to encourage and aid such planning and 
design. The Commission may request from any State department, or po- 
litical subdivision of the State professional and expert advice, assistance 
and data. 



Ch. 686, H. B. 808 

The County Commissioners of any county are authorized to establish 
and utilize a Post- War Construction Fund, from whatever source, for post- 
war capital improvements, deferred maintenance and equipment replace- 
ments, and are permitted to apply to the Post- War Commission for assist- 
ance, cooperation and guidance in the creation and expenditure of funds 
and in the preparation of needed long term improvement programs. Funds 
created for this purpose may be invested in Federal or State securities. 
All such programs may be submitted to the State Commission on Post- War 
Reconstruction and Development, and the said State Commission is author- 
ized to give consideration to the development of an all-over State Post- War 
Program of all programs coming from local and private sources. (See 
Sections 7 and 8 of Article 88c.) 

Ch. 717, S. B. 215 

The tax laws were amended to provide for a continuing method of 
assessment so that all property in every county by classes or districts 
shall be thoroughly reviewed at least once in every five years. The basis 
for annual salaries of Supervisors of Assessment is fixed by law. The 
number of assessors needed and their salary shall be determined by the 
Board of County Commissioners after consultation with the State Tax Com- 
mission. Provision is made for the method of obtaining applicants as asses- 
sors and their selection after interview, examination and grading by the 
State Tax Commission. Decrease in assessments is prohibited at certain 
times, and the procedure to be followed if reductions are to be made are 
set up. (See Sections 175, 179, 180, 184, 185 of Article 81.) 

Ch. 488, H. B. 137 

The methods to be used by the State Tax Commission in assessing 
and taxing operating property of railroads, other public utilities and con- 
tract carriers, and of rolling stock of railroads are adopted by amend- 
ments to Sections 6, 7, 8, 10, 13, 13%, 14 1 / 2 and 15 of Article 81. 



14 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



Ch. 687, H. B. 810 

State jurisdiction over land hereafter acquired by the United States 
within this State is retained to the fullest extent permitted by the Con- 
stitution of the United States and not inconsistent with the Govermental 
uses, purposes and functions for which the land was acquired and is used. 
Nothing in this section shall restrict the authority of the State over lands 
heretofore acquired by the United States. (See Section 41, Article 96.) 

Ch. 602, H. B. 648 

The existence of an emergency by reason of war is declared; provision 
is made for necessary regulations and activities for Civilian Defense; the 
lease or loan of State property or the temporary transfer or employment 
of personnel of the State Government to or by the armed forces of the 
United States, and acceptance of Federal aid in pursuance of the prosecu- 
tion of the war are authorized. 

2 (e) The Governor is authorized to utilize the services and facilities 
of any officers, offices, departments, commissions, boards, bureaus, insti- 
tutions and other agencies of the State. 

The Council may request and receive from any department of the 
State or any political subdivision, expert and professional advice, assist- 
ance and data and such State departments are authorized and directed 
to cooperate as far as may be practicable with the Council. 

Ch. 1000, H. B. 713 

A Maryland Roadside Council of 15 members shall be appointed to 
study and investigate plans to reduce hazards and congestion on or near 
highways; to maintain traffic carrying capacity, value and permanence of 
main highways; to increase and preserve attractiveness and beauty of main 
highways and surrounding areas; and to advise Governor, Legislative 
Council and Legislature of its findings. The Council may request and 
receive from any department of the State or any political subdivision ex- 
pert and professional advice, assistance and data which they are authorized 
to cooperate in furnishing. 



1943 Legislation Affecting Individual County Schools 15 



Maryland 1943 Legislation Affecting Education in Individual Counties 

Allegany 

Ch. 975., H. B. 442 

Provision is made for a county payment of $100 in ten instalments 
beginning October 1, 1943, and ending July 1944 in addition to the State 
payment of $200 in 1943-44; and if the State payment is not continued 
after May 1944, a county payment of $300 in ten instalments beginning 
October 1, 1944, and ending July 1945, to teachers, supervisors, principals 
and attendance officers receiving less than $3,000 per year including these 
additional payments beginning September 1943. These additional pay- 
ments shall not be liable for contributions to the retirement system. Be- 
ginning September 1, 1945, every teacher shall receive $120 per year in 
addition to the amounts provided in Section 620A of the Allegany County 
laws as enacted by Chapter 344 of the Laws of 1939. (See Section 620B 
of Code of Public Local Laws of Allegany County.) 

The wages of persons engaged in custodial and janitorial care of 
school buildings shall be increased by 15% to all persons now receiving 
less than $100 per month; 10% to all such persons receiving $100 per 
month or more. 

Ch. 997, H. B. 699 

Reemployment and retirement status of Allegany County teachers who 
enter the armed services is denned. The provisions correspond with the 
general law, Chapter 333 outlined on page 10. 

Ch. 186, H. B. 281 

Allegany County is excepted from the provisions of Section 45 of 
Article 77 permitting the County Board of Education to sell, with the ap- 
proval of the State Superintendent of Schools, school grounds, sites and 
buildings no longer needed for educational purposes. In Allegany County, 
the title to such grounds, sites and buildings no longer needed for school 
purposes shall vest in the County Commissioners and may be sold, leased, 
or otherwise disposed of (except by gift) by said County Commissioners. 

Ch. 217, H. B. 228 

The County Commissioners are authorized to invest the proceeds from 
the sale of $800,000 school bonds authorized by Chapter 416 of the Acts 
of 1941 and any interest therefrom in bonds or other obligations of the 
United States and the redemption or sale of such securities and the dis- 
posal of the proceeds therefrom are provided for, and the County Board 
of Education is authorized to use any or all of the proceeds for matching 
Federal funds in the construction of the school buildings authorized to be 
erected under the provisions of Chapter 416 of the Acts of 1941. 

Ch. 955, S. B. 598 

The County Commissioners are directed to prescribe rules and regu- 
lations requiring fire escapes, fire and emergency exits and fire fighting 
equipment in or upon all public buildings in Allegany County. All owners 
of public buildings except municipal buildings of three stories or over shall 
place upon the buildings fire escapes. (See Section 177 of the Code of 
Public Local Laws for Allegany County.) 



16 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



Anne Arundel 

Ch. 612, H. B. 670 

The inclusion in the Budget of certain sums every year for "Future 
Capital Improvements" which shall include school buildings and other 
public buildings to make unnecessary issuance of bonds for such improve- 
ments is provided for. (See Section 174C of Article 2 of the Public Local 
Laws for Anne Arundel County.) 

Baltimore County 

Ch. 700, H. B. 312 

A Department of Public Works with a Chief Engineer and his staff is 
provided. The Chief Engineer shall have supervision over all engineering 
questions and over all matters concerned or connected with any and every 
public improvement made by any department or board. (See Sections 
544A and 544B of Article 3 of Code of Public Local Laws for Baltimore 
County.) 

Ch. 694, H. B. 326 

School Commissioners shall comply with all building regulations 
adopted by the County Commissioners, shall provide suitable fire escapes 
for all school buildings heretofore erected and now in use if buildings are 
more than one story in height and all buildings now in course of construc- 
tion or hereafter to be erected; and in the event of failure of the School 
Commissioners to comply with the provisions of this Act, the County Com- 
missioners shall have the power to contract for doing such work and deduct 
the cost thereof from the amount levied for the support of county schools. 
(See Sections 63-67 and 70-71 of Article 3 of Code of Public Local Laws 
for Baltimore County.) 

Ch. 504, H. B. 327 

The County Commissioners are authorized to appropriate funds, levy 
taxes, and to take such other positive action as they may deem necessary 
and proper in connection with National and Civilian Defense or for the 
preservation of public health, safety and welfare. (See Sections 104B-104E 
of Article 3, Code of Public Local Laws for Baltimore County.) 

Calvert 

Ch. 268, S. B. 269 

The County Commissioners of Calvert County are authorized to issue 
$15,000 in bonds for a school building at Huntingtown. 

Caroline 

Ch. 793, S. B. 361 

Caroline is added to the list of counties which require scholarships 
to Blue Ridge, Charlotte Hall, Maryland Institute, St. John's College, St. 
Mary's Female Seminary, Washington College and Western Maryland 
College to be awarded by State senators only after competitive examina- 
tions prepared and scored by the above institutions. 

Ch. 824, S. B. 428 

Sections 545-551 of Article 6 of the Public Local Laws of Caroline 
County which are obsolete laws concerning the county school board and 
certain schools in the county are repealed. 



1943 Legislation Affecting Individual County Schools 17 



Frederick 
Ch. 91, S. B. 156 

Sections 711-718 of Article 11 of the Code of Public Local Laws for 
Frederick County which are obsolete laws relating to levying of taxes 
and expenditures of funds for county schools are repealed. 



Garrett 

Ch, 384, S. B. 341 

Sections 486-492 of Article 12 of the Code of Public Local Laws for 
Garrett County which are obsolete laws concerning schools are repealed. 

Ch. 641, H. B. 720 

The County Commissioners are authorized to borrow $6,000 to be used 
by the Garrett County Board of Education in adjusting the compensation 
of contractors operating school buses in Garrett County. The 1944 levy 
is to include a sum sufficient to pay the loan with interest. 

Ch. 746, S. B. 402 

The Garrett County Board of Education is authorized to divert $10,000 
levied in 1939 for the construction of a school at McHenry to the con- 
struction of a school at North Glade for which $8,000 was levied in 1939. 
Anything remaining from the appropriation of $18,000 for North Glade 
shall be used by the County Board of Education for other capital outlay 
or school repairs. 

Ch. 747, S. B. 403 

The County Commissioners of Garrett County are authorized to levy 
$25,000 for 1944 and 1945 for the purpose of either making improvements 
in and additions to the present Oakland High School building or building 
a new high school in Oakland. 



Howard 

Ch. 366, H. B. 477 

Section 39 of Article 77 is amended to increase the allowance for travel 
and other expenses for each member of the County Board of Education of 
Howard County from $100 to $200. 

Ch. 648, H. B. 732 

The Board of Education of Howard County is authorized to permit 
transportation of children who attend non-state aided parochial schools on 
public school buses. The County Commissioners are authorized to appropri- 
ate funds not derived from the tax on real property to defray the cost^ 
of such transportation on the same basis as is charged for the transporta- 
tion of public school pupils. (See Sections 291 A and 291B of the Code 
of Public Local Laws for Howard County.) 



18 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



Montgomery 

Ch. 336, S. B. 284 

The issue of bonds totalling $1,337,050 for the purpose of refunding 
a like amount of outstanding bonds of the county maturing between June 
30, 1943 and June 30, 1945 is authorized. School bonds are included. 

Ch. 227, H. B. 216 

Various local laws relating to the supervisor and assistant supervisor 
of school property in Montgomery County are repealed. 

Ch. 968, H. B. 217 

Subsection (3) of Section 142 of Article 77 is amended to require for 
Montgomery County the appointment by the Board of Education at its 
first meeting after June 1, 1943, of a supervisor of school property for a 
term of four years at a salary of $3,000 plus travelling and other expenses. 
The supervisor of school property shall appoint an assistant supervisor 
of school property at a salary of $2,400 plus $600 for expenses. The duties 
of the supervisor with respect to school buildings, school buses and their 
drivers, janitors, insurance on school property and bonding of employees 
are defined. 

Ch. 188, H. B. 218 

The County Commissioners are authorized to use county facilities in- 
cluding school buildings, buses, equipment as necessary for the welfare 
and benefit of the citizens in aiding the war effort. (See Section 187 A of 
the Code of Public Local Laws for Montgomery County.) 

St. Mary's 

Ch. 712, S. B. 163 

The County Commissioners are authorized and directed to levy and 
appropriate annually sufficient funds to defray any costs incurred in carry- 
ing into effect the provisions of Sections 202C and 202D. (See Section 
202E of the Public Local Laws for St. Mary's County.) 

The County Commissioners acting with the Board of Education of St. 
Mary's County or independently are authorized and directed to establish 
such new bus routes as may be necessary to transport children attending 
non-state aided schools to and from school, comparable with that now fur- 
nished children attending public schools of St. Mary's County. 



Wicomico 



Ch. 53, H. B. 176 

Election day as a school holiday in Wicomico County is eliminated by 
an amendment of Section 84 of Article 77. 

Ch. 293, S. B. 238 

Furniture is exempted from taxation in Wicomico County by an amend- 
ment of subsection 17 of Section 7 of Article 81. 



1943 School Legislation; 1942 School Census 19 

TABLE 2 — Census of Boys and Girls Under 21 Years of Age in 23 
Maryland Counties By Age, Color, and Sex, November, 1942 



Age 


White 


Colored 
















Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties 














(5-18) 1936 


201,281 


102,678 


98,603 


41,988 


21,264 


20,734 


(5-18) 1938 


202,884 


103,595 


99,289 


41,642 


21,041 


20,601 


(5-18) 1940 


205,329 


104,603 


100,726 


41,086 


20,557 


20,529 


C5-18) 1942 


210,075 


107,009 


103,066 


40,295 


20,253 


20,042 


Total Ages 20 or Under 














1942 


301,466 


154,289 


147,177 


57,290 


28,888 


28,402 


20 


11,596 


6,282 


5,314 


2, 119 


1 , 143 


976 


19 


12,920 


6,855 


6,065 


2,421 


1 ,301 


1,120 


18 


14,042 


7,371 


6,671 


2,740 


1,356 


1,384 


17.. 


14,875 


7,724 


7, 151 


2,710 


1,412 


1 ,298 


16 


14,823 


7,672 


7,151 


2,853 


1,465 


1,388 


15 


15,427 


7,687 


7,740 


2,863 


1,432 


1,431 


14 


15,504 


7,878 


7,626 


3,049 


1,500 


1,549 


13 


15,210 


7,615 


7,595 


2,989 


1,510 


1,479 


12 


15,600 


7,936 


7,664 


3,104 


1,549 


1,555 


11 


15,167 


7,696 


7,471 


2,895 


1,483 


1,412 




14 982 


7 586 


7 396 


2 943 


1 452 


1 491 


9 


14^877 


7^506 


7^371 


2^886 


l|467 


1,419 




14,493 


7,357 


7,136 


3,011 


1,502 


1,509 


7 


15,339 


7,737 


7,602 


2,815 


1,416 


1,399 


6 


15,206 


7,745 


7,461 


2,853 


1,437 


1,416 


5 


14,530 


7,499 


7,031 


2,584 


1,272 


1,312 


4 


14,008 


7,251 


6,757 


2,571 


1,290 


1,281 


3 


13,819 


7,063 


6,756 


2,596 


1,252 


1,344 


2 


13,609 


6,950 


6,659 


2,720 


1,362 


1,358 


1 


11,791 


6,054 


5,737 


2,047 


1,020 


1,027 


Under 1 


13,648 


6,825 


6,823 


2,521 


1,267 


1,254 


Balto. City (5-18) 1942 


120,891 






34,969 






Entire State (5-18) 1942 


330,966 






75,264 







TABLE 3— Brief Summary of 1942 School Census of Maryland Children 



County 


Census 
Ages 7-15 Years 


Change 
1940 to 1942 


Census 
Ages 
6-14 

Years 


Change 
1940 

to 
1942 


Ages 7-15 Yeai 
Number 


s in No School 
Percent 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


Total Counties 


136,599 


26,555 


+2,367 


—242 


162,923 


+3,882 


4,700 


2,081 


3 


4 


7.8 




14,045 


218 


—1,071 


—25 


14,102 


—879 


296 


15 


2 


1 


6.9 


Anne Arundel 


8,570 


3,139 


+ 1,008 


+ 100 


11,824 


+ 1,281 


269 


206 


3 


1 


6.6 




23,476 


2,001 


+ 1,017 


+ 100 


25,615 


+ 1,663 


818 


161 


3 


5 


8.0 




918 


1 , 103 


—1 


+ 14 


2,087 


+64 


33 


103 


3 


6 


9.3 


Caroline 


2,030 


635 


—190 


—56 


2,566 


—266 


73 


39 


3 


6 


6.1 


Carroll 


5,300 


315 


—199 


—35 


5,498 


—196 


249 


22 


4 


7 


7.0 


Cecil 


3,927 


427 


+ 148 


+29 


4,319 


+ 185 


125 


28 


3 


2 


6.6 


Charles 


2,099 


1,729 


+ 146 


+ 12 


3,900 


+276 


74 


205 


3 


5 


11.9 


Dorchester 


2,666 


1,320 


—262 


—50 


3,858 


—320 


113 


114 


4 


2 


8.6 




7,976 


822 


—676 


—71 


8,683 


—712 


575 


92 


7 


2 


11.2 


Garrett 


4,191 




—261 


—1 


4,122 


—286 


183 




4 


4 






5,336 


*795 


+429 


—47 


6,160 


+ 501 


239 


"77 


4 


5 


9. '7 




2,907 


712 


+ 178 


+48 


3,671 


+301 


112 


50 


3 


9 


7.0 


Kent 


1,291 


702 


—108 


—32 


1,960 


—133 


43 


61 


3 


3 


8.7 




12,701 


1,882 


+ 1,604 


+84 


14,813 


+ 1,921 


130 


151 


1 





8.0 


Prince George's. . . 


14,834 


3,574 


+ 1,762 


—56 


18,740 


+ 1,827 


192 


246 


1 


3 


6.9 




1,576 


752 


—130 


—26 


2,324 


—151 


15 


17 


1 





2.3 


St. Mary's 


2,315 


1,167 


+ 168 


—111 


3,494 


+94 


101 


141 


4 


4 


12.1 




1,929 


1,344 


—283 


—74 


3,221 


—338 


128 


69 


6 


6 


5.1 


Talbot 


1,717 


876 


—115 


—38 


2,566 


—190 


51 


59 


3 





6.7 


Washington 


11,167 


242 


—269 


+4 


11,219 


—206 


584 


10 


5 


2 


4.1 


Wicomico 


3,612 


1,324 


—311 


—69 


4,775 


—416 


212 


68 


5 


9 


5.1 




2,016 


1,476 


—217 


+ 58 


3,406 


—138 


85 


147 


4 


2 


10.0 


Baltimore City 


86,592 


26,183 


+2,198 


+475 


112,006 


+3,920 












Entire State. ..... 


223,191 


52,738 


+4,565 


+233 


274,929 


+7,802 













20 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 4 



Number and Percent of Maryland County Children Enumerated of Ages 7-15 
Years Inclusive, in Public, Private and Parochial Schools, and 
No School, November, 1942 





Number 


Percent 


County 




In Pri- 








In Pri- 




In 


vate and 


In 




In 


vate and 


In 




Public 


Parochial 


No 


Total 


Public 


Parochial 


No 




School 


School 


School 




School 


School 


School 



White Children 



Total and Average: 

1938 




















116,434 


12,128 


5,414 


133,976 


86 


9 


9 


1 


4.0 


1940 


117,635 


12,308 


4,289 


134,232 


87 


.6 


9 


2 


3.2 


1942 


119,499 


12,400 


4,700 


136,599 


87 


.5 


9 


.1 


3.4 


Montgomery 

Queen Anne's 


10,774 


1,797 


130 


12,701 


84 


8 


14 


2 


1.0 


1,546 


15 


15 


1,576 


98 


.0 


1 





1.0 




13,868 


774 


192 


14,834 


93 


.5 


5 


2 


1.3 




11,719 


2,030 


296 


14,045 


83 


4 


14 


5 


2.1 




1,633 


33 


51 


1,717 


95 




1 


9 


3.0 




7,688 


613 


269 


8,570 


89 


7 


7 


2 


3.1 




3,488 


314 


125 


3,927 


88 


8 


8 





3.2 


Kent 


1,215 


33 


43 


1,291 


94 


1 


2 


6 


3.3 




19,018 


3,640 


818 


23,476 


81 





15 


5 


3.5 




1,691 


334 


74 


2,099 


80 


6 


15 


9 


3.5 




834 


51 


33 


918 


90 


8 


5 


6 


3.6 




1,945 


12 


73 


2,030 


95 


8 




6 


3.6 




2,523 


272 


112 


2,907 


86 


7 


9 


4 


3.9 




2,536 


17 


113 


2,666 


95 


1 




7 


4.2 




1,925 


6 


85 


^,016 


95 


5 




3 


4.2 




3,944 


64 


183 


4,191 


94 


1 


1 


5 


4.4 




1,081 


1,133 


101 


2,315 


46 


6 


49 





4.4 




4,875 


222 


239 


5,336 


91 


4 


4 


1 


4.5 


Carroll 


4,872 


179 


249 


5,300 


91 


9 


3 


4 


4.7 


Washington 


10,226 


357 


584 


11,167 


91 


6 


3 


2 


5.2 




3,371 


29 


212 


3,612 


93 


3 




8 


5.9 




1,796 


5 


128 


1,929 


93 


1 




3 


6.6 




6,931 


470 


575 


7,976 


86 


9 


5 


9 


7.2 



Colored Children 



Total and Average: 




















1938 


*24 , 505 


658 


*2,537 


**27,700 


*88 


5 


2.4 


*9 


1 




24,100 


647 


*2,050 


*26,797 


89 


9 


2.4 


*7 


7 


1942 


23,821 


653 


2,081 


26,555 


89 


7 


2.5 


7 


8 




735 




17 


752 


97 


7 




2 


3 




232 




10 


242 


95 


9 




4 


1 




1,270 


"'5 


69 


1,344 


94 


5 


' ' A 


5 


1 




1,256 




68 


1,324 


94 


9 




5 


1 




594 


"2 


39 


635 


93 


5 


' ' .3 


6 


2 




2,868 


65 


206 


3,139 


91 


4 


2.1 


6 


5 


Cecil 


397 


2 


28 


427 


93 





.5 


6 


5 




816 


1 


59 


876 


93 


2 


.1 


6 


7 




200 


3 


15 


218 


91 


7 


1.4 


6 


9 




3,216 


112 


246 


3,574 


90 





3.1 


6 


9 


Carroll 


293 




22 


315 


93 







7 







627 


' 35 


50 


712 


88 


1 


A.9 


7 







1,822 


18 


161 


2,001 


91 


1 


.9 


8 







1,726 


5 


151 


1,882 


91 


7 


.3 


8 







1,206 




114 


1,320 


91 


4 




8 


6 




641 




61 


702 


91 


3 




8 


7 




1,000 


.... 


103 


1,103 


90 


7 




9 


3 




717 




77 


795 


90 


2 




9 


7 




1,323 


6 


147 


1,476 


89 


6 


.4 


10 







722 


8 


92 


822 


87 


8 


1.0 


11 


2 




1,414 


110 


205 


1,729 


81 


8 


6.4 


11 


8 




746 


280 


141 


1.167 


63 


9 


24.0 


12 


1 



* Represents one child in Garrett County. 



1942 Maryland School Census 



21 



TABLE 5 

Non-School Attendants of Ages 7-15 Years Enumerated in 23 Maryland 
Counties Distributed According to Employment, Handicap, and Age 
Group, November, 1942 



Children of Ages 7-15 Years Not in School 













Physically 


Mentally 


County 


Employed 


Not Employed 


Handicapped 


Handicapped 




7-13 


14-15 


7-13 


14-15 


7-13 


14-15 


7-13 


14-15 




Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 


Years 



White Children 



Total 1936 


180 


3,451 


291 


1,893 


368 


163 


203 


126 


1938 


102 


2,433 


236 


1,869 


313 


168 


188 


105 


1940 


82 


2,095 


168 


1,206 


266 


164 


196 


112 


1942 


124 


2,941 


164 


831 


256 


144 


149 


91 


Allegany 


3 


138 


13 


89 


16 


17 


14 


6 


Anne Arundel 


5 


141 


16 


81 


10 


7 


3 


6 


Baltimore 


4 


446 


56 


209 


40 


27 


21 


15 


Calvert 


2 


16 


1 


11 


1 


1 




1 




1 


55 




2 


4 


3 


6 


2 


Carroll 


10 


212 




4 


8 


5 


7 


3 


Cecil 


3 


52 


8 


34 


9 


3 


7 


9 




1 


28 


9 


29 


2 


1 


2 


2 




3 


72 


7 


16 


4 


1 


4 


6 


Frederick 


50 


377 


16 


97 


17 


4 


13 


1 


Garrett 


2 


103 


2 


31 


25 


11 


4 


5 


Harford 


12 


145 


11 


39 


13 


6 


6 


7 


Howard 




80 


2 


14 


8 


3 


5 




Kent 


i 


38 






1 


1 


1 


i 




4 


81 


*4 


io 


12 


7 


7 


5 


Prince George's 




131 




10 


26 


8 


11 


6 






12 




2 






1 






5 


55 


6 


14 


15 


3 


3 






5 


71 


4 


37 


2 


4 


2 


3 


Talbot 


1 


29 




10 


1 


1 


6 


3 


Washington 


12 


410 


'8 


80 


27 


25 


13 


9 


Wicomico 




188 


1 




11 


4 


7 


1 


Worcester 




61 




12 


4 


2 


6 





Colored Children 



Total 1938 


90 


1,153 


295 


781 


105 


39 


52 


22 


1940 


64 


1,026 


202 


569 


72 


40 


54 


23 


1942 


88 


1,301 


190 


280 


93 


44 


53 


32 


Allegany 




6 


4 


3 


1 






1 


Anne Arundel 


ii 


119 


19 


35 


12 


*3 


5 


2 


Baltimore 


8 


76 


42 


22 


7 




4 


2 


Calvert 


7 


56 


15 


17 


4 


i 


1 


2 






33 






1 




3 


2 


Carroll 


2 


17 


i 


i 


1 








Cecil 


1 


14 


l 


10 


1 




i 




Charles 


15 


82 


43 


49 


10 


2 


1 


3 




2 


61 


10 


24 


6 


8 


2 




Frederick 


5 


49 


9 


18 


4 


2 


4 


1 


Horf ord 


8 


53 


1 


10 


3 


1 




1 


Haward 




43 




1 


2 


2 




2 




i 


51 




2 


1 


3 


'i 


2 


Montgomery 


10 


90 


ii 


16 


7 


3 


5 


2 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


2 


174 


3 


23 


17 


8 


11 


8 




17 














St. Mary's 


ii 


86 


ii 


H 


2 


h 


4 






l 


36 


9 


17 


5 




1 




Talbot 


3 


42 




6 


3 


*3 


2 




Washington 




6 




1 


1 




1 




Wicomico 




62 






1 




3 


2 




i 


128 




'8 


4 


i 


4 


1 



22 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 6 — Physically and Mentally Handicapped School Attendants 
of Ages 7-15 Years Enumerated in 23 Maryland Counties 



County 


White Ch ildren 
of Ages 7-15 Years in School 


Colored Children 
of Ages 7-15 Years in School 


Physically 
Handicapped 


Mentally 
Handicapped 


Physically 
Handicapped 


Mentally 
Handicapped 


Total 1938 


816 


345 


140 


34 


1940 


865 


212 


121 


56 


1942 


773 


123 


168 


30 




119 


15 


1 




Anne Arundel 


19 






3 




144 


21 


13 






5 




4 




Caroline 


11 


i 


2 




Carroll 


53 


7 


5 


2 


Cecil 


15 


2 








15 


2 


12 


i 






Q 
O 


15 


3 


Frederick 


40 


4 


2 


2 




44 


9 






Harford 


43 


4 


2 


'2 


Howard 


16 


4 


3 


1 


Kent 


12 




11 






26 


*7 


2 


*3 




19 


3 


47 














St. Mary's 


4i 


6 


29 


2 




n 


4 


3 




Talbot 


3 




2 




Washington 


78 


12 


2 






20 


17 


6 


ii 




15 


2 


7 





TABLE 7— Status of Youth of Ages 14-20 Years, Inclusive, Enumerated 
in 23 Maryland Counties, November, 1942 



Ages 


Total 
Number 
Ages 14-20 
Years 


Percent of Total Number of Ages 14-20 Years Inclusive 


Not Employed 


Employed 


In School 


Not 
Handicapped 


Physically 
Handicapped 


Mentally 
Handicapped 


Boys Girls 


Boys Girls 


Boys Girls 


Boys Girls 


Boys Girls 


Boys Girls 



White 



Total and 




























Average 


51,469 


47,718 


2.9 


12.0 


.5 


.4 


.3 


.2 


52.1 


37 


1 


44.4 


50.1 


14 


7,878 


7,626 


1.0 


2.5 


.4 


.4 


.3 


.3 


7.3 


3 


6 


91.0 


93.2 


15 


7,687 


7,740 


2.6 


4.7 


.5 


.6 


.4 


.2 


18.0 


9 




78.6 


85.3 


16 


7,672 


7,151 


3.3 


9.1 


.7 


.4 


.4 


.3 


38.4 


23 


9 


57.3 


66.2 


17 


7,724 


7,151 


3.6 


13.9 


.7 


.5 


.3 


.2 


60.1 


44 


6 


35.3 


40.8 


18 


7,371 


6,671 


3.0 


17.3 


.5 


.6 


.3 


.2 


78.5 


61 


7 


17.8 


20.1 


19 


6,855 


6,065 


2.4 


19.7 


.5 


.5 


.2 


.2 


85.7 


67 


3 


11.2 


12.3 


20 


6,282 


5,314 


2.4 


22.2 


.6 


.4 


.3 


.3 


89.3 


68 





7.4 


9.1 



Colored 



Total and 
































Average 


9,609 


9,146 


3 


8 


14.0 


.6 


.7 


.4 


.4 


64 


7 


46 


2 


30.5 


38.7 


14 


1 , 500 


1,549 


2 


9 


5.8 


.7 


.8 


.5 


.4 


18 


2 


8 


4 


77.7 


84.6 


15 


1,432 


1,431 


3 


3 


6.9 


.7 


.8 


.6 


.7 


40 





22 


7 


55.5 


68.8 


16 


1 , 465 


1,888 


4 





13.0 


.7 


.9 


. 5 


.4 


60 


2 


39 


4 


34.6 


46.3 


17 


1,412 


1,298 


5 


2 


16.2 


.4 


.6 


.3 


.4 


76 


3 


57 





17.8 


25.8 


18 


1 ,356 


1,384 


4 





20 . 2 


.4 


.5 


.4 


.4 


86 


9 


68 


5 


8.2 


10.5 


19 


1,301 


1,120 


4 





20 . 


.8 


.8 


.5 


.3 


90 


2 


72 


3 


4.6 


6.5 


20 


1,143 


976 


3 





20.3 


.2 


.7 


.3 


.3 


93 


1 


74 


2 


3.4 


4.5 



t 



1942 Maryland School Census 



23 



TABLE 8 

Distribution of Youth of Ages 16-20 Years Inclusive Enumerated in 23 
Maryland Counties, November, 1942 



County 


Total 
Number 
Ages 16-20 
Years 


Percent of Total Number of Ages 16-23 Years Inclusive 


Not Employed 


Employed 


In School 


Not 
Handicapped 


Physically 
Handicapped 


Mentally 
Handicapped 


Boys Girls 


Boys Girls 


Boys Girls 


Boys Girls 


Boys Girls 


Boys Girls 



White Youth 



Total and 
































Average .... 


35,904 


32,352 


3.0 


16.0 


.6 


.5 


.3 


.2 


69 


.2 


51 


.7 


26 


.9 


31.6 


Allegany 


4,306 


4,032 


4.8 


19.3 


.4 


.4 


.1 


2 


67 


.9 


44 


9 


26 


8 


35.2 


Anne Arundel . 


2,141 


1,785 


3.9 


20.7 


.6 


.4 


.2 


.2 


70 


.6 


48 


5 


24 


8 


30.1 


Baltimore. . . . 


6,014 


5,266 


2.8 


13.6 


.6 


.5 


.2 


.2 


70 


.5 


58 


4 


25 


9 


27.3 


Calvert 


167 


140 


4.8 


25.7 




.7 






76 





35 


7 


19 


2 


37.9 


Caroline 


653 


557 


.6 


5.6 


\i 




.3 


.2 


76 


.3 


63 


5 


22 


4 


30.7 


Carroll 


1 , 594 


1,494 


1.4 


11.6 


1.3 


'.8 


.2 


.3 


77 


.1 


62 


6 


19 


9 


24.8 


Cecil 


1,138 


1,072 


2.9 


17.2 


.1 


.5 


.6 


.5 


73 


9 


57 


2 


22 


5 


24.6 


Charles 


515 


504 


6.0 


25.8 


1.6 


.8 


.8 


.2 


63 


5 


44 





28 


1 


29.2 


Dorchester. . . 


888 


824 


3.3 


23.9 


.2 


.6 


.2 


.9 


76 


1 


52 


3 


20 


2 


'22.3 


Frederick 


2,374 


2,056 


3.4 


15.9 


.8 


.6 


.2 


.3 


75 


9 


58 





19 


6 


25.3 


Garrett 


1,226 


1,065 


8.3 


14.8 


.7 


.5 


.4 


.3 


66 


4 


54 


6 


24 


1 


29.9 


Harford 


1,201 


1,071 


2.6 


17.5 


1.5 


.6 


.5 


.1 


72 


3 


54 


1 


23 


1 


27.7 


Howard 


685 


706 


1.6 


22.2 


.4 


.6 




.3 


76 


6 


50 


3 


21 




26.6 


Kent 


458 


371 




28.8 




.8 




1.4 


74 


5 


37 


7 


25 


I 


31.3 


Montgomery . . 


2,749 


2,612 


1^3 


10.0 


.3 


.5 


'a 


.2 


43 


8 


30 


3 


54 


2 


59.0 


Pr. George's. . 


2,900 


2,582 


.7 


2.1 


.2 


.3 


.2 


.2 


66 


8 


61 


6 


32 


2 


35.7 


Queen Anne's. 


473 


381 




.8 










72 


9 


60 


1 


27 


1 


39.1 


St. Mary's 


673 


538 


i!6 


27.1 


.9 


.6 


'.7 


!4 


77 


9 


43 


5 


19 


5 


28.4 




. 571 


505 


4.4 


28.3 


.9 


.6 


.5 


.2 


73 


7 


48 


3 


20 


5 


22.6 




506 


454 


.2 


31.5 




.5 




.2 


74 


9 


39 


4 


24 


9 


28.4 


Washington . . . 


2,885 


2,744 


4.7 


19.7 


.6 


.7 


.5 


.3 


69 


9 


51 


3 


24 


3 


28.0 


Wicomico. . . . 


1,129 


1,004 


1.7 


19.8 


.5 


.2 


.1 


.1 


72 


9 


53 


7 


24 


8 


26.2 


Worcester. . . . 


658 


589 


1.7 


21.4 


.7 


.3 


.3 


.5 


75.4 


49 


8 


21 


9 


28.2 



Colored Youth 



Total and 


























Average .... 


6,677 


6,166 


4.1 


17.7 


.5 


.7 


.4 


.4 


80.5 


61.1 


14.5 


20.1 


Allegany 


77 


64 


5.2 


12.5 


3.9 








67.5 


45.3 


23.4 


42.2 


Anne Arundel . 


770 


748 


6.9 


25.5 


.3 


.3 


.6 




78.0 


52.7 


14.2 


21.5 


Baltimore.... 1 467 


434 


3.2 


16.1 


.2 


.5 


.4 


.5 


80.3 


60.1 


15.9 


22.8 


Calvert 


194 


175 


4.1 


33.2 




1.1 




1.1 


84.0 


41.7 


11.9 


22.9 


Caroline 


176 


170 


2.3 


12.9 


.6 


1.8 




.6 


81.2 


72.4 


15.9 


12.3 


Carroll 


90 


113 


3.4 


16.8 


1.1 


3.5 






75.6 


57.5 


20.0 


22.1 


Cecil 


151 


101 


.7 


31.7 




3.0 






82.8 


49.5 


16.5 


15.8 


Charles 


420 


352 


6.9 


25.6 


.2 




.2 


i!i 


84.8 


54.3 


7.9 


19.0 


Dorchester. . . 


370 


344 


4.9 


18.0 


1.9 


2.6 


.5 


.9 


77.3 


66.3 


15.4 


12.8 


Frederick 


228 


210 


5.3 


26.7 


.4 


1.4 


1.3 


.9 


80.7 


56.7 


12.3 


14.3 


Harford 


159 


155 


1.9 


18.7 










79.2 


58.7 


18.9 


22.6 


Howard 


185 


158 


4.9 


17.1 


.5 


.6 






86.5 


68.4 


8.1 


13.9 


Kent 


205 


192 


3.9 


24.5 


1.0 


.5 


.5 


.'5 


83.9 


63.6 


10.7 


10.9 


Montgomery. . 


411 


374 


7.5 


29.4 


.5 


.3 


.3 


.5 


76.6 


47.6 


15.1 


22.2 


Pr. George's. . 


815 


721 


2.6 


7.2 


.4 




.4 


.1 


82.8 


72.0 


13.9 


20.6 


Queen Anne's. 


205 


173 














86.3 


79.2 


13.7 


20.8 


St. Mary's 


351 


332 


l'.i 


17^2 


i!i 


3.6 


!9 




87.7 


66.3 


8.8 


13.0 


Somerset 


368 


370 


4.1 


11.1 


.3 




.3 




75.5 


60.8 


19.8 


28.1 


Talbot 


225 


235 




23.8 


.5 


'4 






79.1 


56.6 


20.4 


19.2 


Washington . . . 


76 


59 


5^3 


20.3 










84.2 


69.5 


10.5 


10.2 


Wicomico. . . . 


310 


336 


9.7 


8.0 


.3 


.3 


!6 


.'9 


61.6 


56.6 


27.8 


34.2 


Worcester. . . . 


424 


350 


.2 


7.2 


.2 


.3 


.2 


.6 


89.4 


77.4 


9.9 


14.6 



24 



1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 9— Opening and Closing Dates Year Ending June 30, 1943 







Date of 


Closing Schools in 1943 






Date of 














County 


Opening 
School in 


For 


For 


For 




September 


Elementary 


High Schools 


High Schools 




1942 


Schools 


(Except S 


eniors) 


Seniors 




8 


June 


11 


June 


11 


June 


11 


Anne Arundel 


7 


June 


9 


June 


4 


June 


4 




7 


June 


18 




18 


June 


4 




8 


June 


8 


June 


8 


June 


8 




8 


May 


25 


May 




May 


25 


Carroll 


13 


*June 


7 


*June 


7 


*June 


7 


Cecil 


14 


June 


11 


June 


11 


June 


11 


Charies 


10 


June 


4 


June 


4 


June 


4 


Dorchester 


8 


May 


28 


May 


28 


May 


28 




13 


June 


4 


June 


4 


June 


4 


Garrett 


7 


June 


11 


June 


11 


June 


11 


Harford 


8 


June 


11 


June 


11 


June 


11 


Howard 


8 


June 


11 


June 


11 


June 


11 


Kent 


8 


June 


5 


June 


5 


June 


5 


Montgomery 


13 


fJune 


18 


fJune 


18 


fJune 


18 




9 


June 


18 


June 


18 


June 


18 




8 


May 


22 


May 


22 


May 


22 


St. Mary's 


15 


§June 


2 


§June 


2 


§June 


2 




7 


May 


21 


May 


21 


May 


21 


Talbot 


9 


June 


4 


June 


4 


June 


4 




13 


June 


11 


June 


11 


June 


11 




7 


JMay 


28 


JMay 


28 


JMay 


28 


Worcester 


1 


May 


31 


May 


31 


May 


31 


Baltimore City 


7 


June 


18 


June 


18 


June 


18 



* Except for Taney town, New Windsor, and Harney, where schools closed on June 8. 

t Except for Poolesville School, which closed on May 20. 

t Except for schools having Saturday classes, which closed on May 14. 

§ Great Mills High School closed June 1, Jarboesville High and Elementary Schools clo3ei June 3 



TABLE 10— Number of County Schools in Session Fewer than 180 Days 
Year Ending June 30, 1943 



Year 


For All Counties By Year — 
Schools 


County 


For 1943 By County- 
Schools 




Total 
No. 


Having 

One 
Teacher 


Having 
More 
Than One 
Teacher 


Total 

No. 


Having 

One 
Teacher 


Larger 

Ele- 
mentary 
Schools 


High 
Schools 


Schools for White Pupils 


1926 


124 


109 


15 
6 


Charles 


3 


bl 


cl 


cl 


1930 


28 


22 


Garrett 


d5 


5 


1935 


a33 


18 
6 


15 
6 


Harford 


el 
3 


1 






1942 


12 


Pr. George's . 




f2 


gi 


1943 


al2 


7 


5 













Schools for Colored Pupils 



1942 
1943. 



hi 



Charles. . . 
St. Mary's. 



k3 




3 




ml 






i 



a Excludes elementary school at Frostburg State Teachers College, open 179 days in 1935 and 
178 davs in 1948. 
b 159 days, 
c 176 days. 

d One school open 166 days, one 178 days, one 178.5 days, two 179 days, 
e 179.5 days. 

f One school open 168 days, one 178.7 days, 
g 169 days. 

h Exclude! elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College, open 178.8 days, 
k Two schools open 172 days, one 179 days, 
m 179.8 days. 



Days in School Session; Enrollment 1930 to 1943 25 



TABLE 11 — Comparison of Enrollment in Counties and Baltimore City 
in Public and Non-Public Schools, 1930 to 1943 



Year 


Total 


Public Schools 


Catholic Schools 


Non-Catholic 
Non-Public Schools 




°Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


^Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


Counties 


Baltimore 
City 



°White Elementary School Enrollment 



1930 


118,717 


109,159 


108,737 


78,133 


8,722 


29,002 


1,258 


2,024 


1932 


121,923 


108,720 


111,370 


76,949 


9,321 


29,954 


1 , 232 


1,817 


1933 


123,224 


108,420 


112,509 


76,426 


9,636 


30,399 


1,079 


1,595 


1934 


122,881 


107,883 


111,907 


75,311 


9,876 


31,020 


1,098 


1,552 


1935 


122,559 


107,192 


111,696 


74,818 


9,622 


30,735 


1,241 


1,639 


1936 


121,857 


107,230 


110,938 


75,316 


9,698 


30,171 


1,221 


1,743 


1937 


122,247 


105,173 


110,955 


73,452 


9,785 


29,817 


1,507 


1,904 


1938 


121,422 


103,094 


109,636 


71,392 


9,933 


29,384 


1,853 


2,318 


1939 


121,137 


100,250 


109,579 


68,863 


9,823 


29 , 090 


1,735 


2,297 


1940 


120,719 


96,947 


109,154 


66,896 


9,828 


27,947 


1,737 


2,104 


1941 


121,932 


95,401 


110,021 


65,732 


10,082 


27,371 


1,830 


2,298 


1942 


124,973 


94,438 


112,294 


65,123 


10,643 


26,703 


2,036 


2,612 


1943 


128,436 


94,780 


*115,253 


*65,904 


til, 059 


26,104 


t2,124 


t2,772 



White High and Vocational School Enrollment 



1930 


27,893 


18,167 


24,760 


14,139 


1,480 


3,150 


1,653 


878 


1932 


31,775 


21,560 


28,547 


17,173 


1,574 


3,553 


1,654 


834 


1933 


33,678 


23,399 


30,778 


18,920 


1,542 


3,755 


1,358 


724 


1934 


33,760 


23,439 


31,036 


19,056 


1,389 


3,699 


1,335 


684 


1935 


34,823 


24,679 


31,786 


19,897 


1,592 


4,023 


1,445 


759 


1936 


36,249 


25,438 


33,111 


20,416 


1,587 


4,211 


1,551 


811 


1937 


37,313 


25,365 


33,959 


20,012 


1,707 


4,435 


1,647 


918 


1938 


38,007 


25,111 


34,415 


19,712 


1,787 


4,562 


1,805 


837 


1939 


40,496 


26,410 


36,637 


20,997 


2,022 


4,610 


1,837 


803 


1940 


42,273 


27.093 


38,492 


21,421 


2,083 


4,841 


1,698 


831 


1941 


44,125 


26,784 


39,948 


21,559 


2,496 


4,382 


1,681 


843 


1942 


44,606 


25,213 


40,155 


19,916 


2,676 


4,419 


1,775 


878 


1943 


43,881 


24,020 


*39,448 


*18,485 


f2,711 


f4,705 


tl , 722 


t830 



°Colored Elementary School Enrollment 



1930 


27,367 


22,068 


26,759 


1932 


27,169 


23,560 


26,558 


1933 


27,312 


24,412 


26,708 


1934 


26,954 


25,717 


26,347 


1935 


26,451 


26,702 


25,908 


1936 


25,828 


27,860 


25,328 


1937 


25,221 


28,519 


24,698 


1938 


24,693 


28,131 


24,133 


1939 


24,604 


29,830 


24,052 


1940 


24,328 


29,877 


23,809 


1941 


24,114 


30,515 


23 , 552 


1942 


23,853 


30,546 


23,244 


1943 


23,505 


30,553 


*22,873 



20,643 
22,289 
22,914 
24,160 
25,189 
26,328 
27,038 
26,686 
28,374 
28,408 
29,112 
29,247 
*29,245 



582 
583 
604 
607 
543 
497 
523 
537 
529 
519 
562 
609 
t632 



1,347 
1,211 
1,425 
1,432 
1,392 
1,424 
1,382 
1.360 
1,367 
1,393 
1,335 
1,249 
1,253 



78 
60 
73 
125 
121 
108 
99 
85 
89 
76 
68 
50 
t55 



Colored High and Vocational School Enrollment 



1930 


2,099 


2,351 


1,953 


2,335 


1932 


2,589 


2,812 


2,489 


2,794 


1933 


2,808 


3,134 


2,750 


3,114 


1934 


2,827 


3,071 


2,819 


3,042 


1935 


3,053 


3,199 


3,019 


3,164 


1936 


3,547 


3,211 


3,544 


3,176 


1937 


4,030 


3,322 


4,030 


3,246 


1938 


4,338 


3,480 


4,334 


3,378 


1939 


4,567 


3,838 


4,567 


3,714 


1940 


4,818 


4,149 


4,818 


4,033 


1941 


5,168 


4,188 


5,168 


4,057 


1942 


5,112 


3,941 


5,112 


3,800 


1943 


5,264 


3,765 


*5,264 


*3,595 



15 
18 
14 
16 
11 
14 
58 
84 
106 
97 
112 
128 
U54 



6 
13 
24 
21 
18 
18 
18 
19 
19 
13 
tl6 



° Includes for county public schools enrollment in elementary schools of State normal schools 
or teachers colleges. 

* For public schoo . enrollment in detail by counties and Baltimore City see Table II, pages 
200 to 201. 

t For non-public school enrollment in detail by school, county and Baltimore City, see Tables 
III-V, pages 202 to 206. 



26 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 12 

Total Enrollment in Maryland Elementary Schools, White and 
Colored for Years Ending in June 1923, 1942 and 1943 



County 



White Elementary Schools 



Number Enrolled 



1923 



1942 



1943 



County 



Colored Elementary Schools 



Number Enrolled 



1923 



1942 



1943 



Total Counties . 

Baltimore 

Prince George's 
Montgomery. . . 

Allegany 

Washington 

Anne Arundel . . 

Frederick 

Harford 

Carroll 

Garrett 

Cecil 

Wicomico 

Howard 

Dorchester. . . . 

Charles 

Caroline 

Worcester 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Kent 

Calvert 

Baltimore City. 

Total State. . . . 



*°105,772 

°13,154 
6,421 
4,524 

°10,985 
10,859 
4,947 
8,505 
4,290 
5,902 
5,373 
3,405 
3,986 
2,241 
3,432 
1,803 
3,025 
2,298 
3,059 
2,105 
2,101 
2,117 
1,748 
1,060 

*t79,709 

'1185,481 



*°111,763 

°18,617 
12,534 
11,597 
°11,409 
10,477 
7,050 
6,509 
4,686 
4,578 
3,573 
3,127 
°3,131 
2,442 
2,334 
1,627 
1,745 
1,753 
1,726 
1,469 
1,354 
823 
1,147 
804 

*t65,123 

*tl76,886 



*°114,763 

°19,532 
13,513 
12,396 
°11,215 
10,352 
7,501 
6,328 
4,875 
4,487 
3,469 
3,421 
°2,950 
2,494 
2,226 
1,767 
1,667 
1,655 
1,556 
1,422 
1,281 
1,183 
1,124 
849 

*f65,904 

*tl80,667 



Total Counties. 

Prince George's 
Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Montgomery. . . 

Charles 

Somerset 

Worcester 

Wicomico 

Dorchester. . . . 

Calvert 

Talbot 

Harford 

St. Mary's 

Frederick 

Kent 

Howard 

Caroline 

Queen Anne's. . 

Cecil 

Carroll 

Washington 

Allegany 



Baltimore City . 
Total State. . . . 



♦31,070 

2,781 
2,853 
1,942 
1,898 
1,803 
2,255 
2,088 
1,675 
1,947 
1,343 
1,373 
916 
1,404 
1,150 
1,188 
848 
1,188 
1,093 
548 
440 
377 
267 



*tl5,675 
*f46,745 



*°23,115 

°3,000 
°2,938 
1,1 
1,710 
1,384 
1,267 
1,187 
1,206 
1,116 
1,063 
802 
753 
803 
742 
641 
617 
617 
590 
353 
298 
247 
208 



*f29,247 
*f52,362 



,o 22,740 

°3,013 
°2,935 
1,973 
1,639 
1,398 
1,183 
1,173 
1,162 
1,099 
1,093 
786 
741 
734 
691 
608 
592 
590 
537 
361 
277 
237 
185 



"t29,245 
M-51,985 



* Totals exclude duplicates. 

t Includes estimate of enrollment of grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools in Baltimore City. 
Excludes enrollment in elementary schools of State teachers colleges: 

College 1923 1942 1943 College 1942 1943 

Towson 179 237 232 Bowie 129 133 

Frostburg 122 178 173 

Salisbury 1 16 85 Anne Arundel 27 26 

Prince George's 102 107 

For enrollment by counties arranged alphabetically and by type of organization, see Table II, 
pages 200 to 201. 



Enrollment in Public Elementary and High Schools 27 



TABLE 13 

Total Enrollment in Last Four Years of Maryland High Schools 
for Years Ending in June 1923, 1942 and 1943 



County 



White Enrollment 
in High Schools 



1923 



1942 



1943 



County 



Colored Enrollment 
in High Schools 



1923 



1942 



1943 



Total Counties. 

Baltimore 

Prince George's. 

Allegany 

Montgomery. . . 
Anne Arundel . . 

Washington 

Frederick 

Carroll 

Harford 

Cecil 

Wicomico 

Garrett 

Dorchester. 

Caroline 

Worcester 

Howard 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Charles 

Kent 

Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Calvert 

Baltimore City. 

Total State 



*14,888 

1,512 
824 

1,665 
609 
454 

1,281 

1,421 
775 
651 
514 
901 
449 
558 
597 
649 
284 
462 
437 
99 
282 
403 
23 
143 

*U1,465 
*f26,353 



*40,155 

6,451 
3,975 
4,240 
3,298 
2,736 
2,657 
2,449 
1,861 
1,631 
1,340 
1,297 
1,296 
1,021 
856 
835 
762 
680 
685 
652 
541 
520 
430 
247 

*tl9,916 

*f60,071 



*39,448 

6,478 
4,081 
4,013 
3,220 
2,695 
2,581 
2,393 
1,809 
1,627 



300 
258 
221 
967 
S3 6 
801 
771 
662 
625 
619 
513 
502 
457 
255 



*U8,485 
*f57,933 



Total Counties. 

Anne Arundel . . 

Wicomico 

Prince George's 
Montgomery. . . 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Worcester 

Somerset 

Baltimore 

Talbot 

Frederick 

Harford 

St. Mary's 

Caroline 

Queen Anne's . . 

Kent 

Calvert 

Cecil 

Howard 

Carroll 

Allegany 

Washington 

Baltimore City . 
Total State 



*447 



58 
117 



19 



36 



*fl ,331 
*fl,778 



*5,112 

507 
402 
434 
372 
367 
326 
320 
300 
276 
212 
195 
188 
213 
172 
130 
167 
120 
124 
85 
108 
68 
45 

^3,800 
^8,912 



*5,264 

579 
433 
391 
387 
372 
350 
331 
321 
313 
213 
194 
182 
177 
172 
139 
137 
134 
134 
107 
101 
63 
52 



"13,595 
>t8,859 



* Excludes duplicates. 

t Includes estimated ninth grade enrollment in junior high schools, and enrollment in vocational 
schools. 

For enrollment by counties arranged alphabetically and by type of organization see Table II, 
pages 200 to 201. 



28 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

TABLE 14 

Recorded and Resident Birth Rates Per 1,000 White and Colored Population 



Reported by Bureau of Vital Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



County 


Recorded Birth Rates 


Resident Birth Rates* 


1920 


1930 


1935 


1940 


1941 


1942 


1935 


1940 


1941 


1942 


White 


County Average 


23.5 


17.4 


14.3 


13.4 


14 


5 


15.3 


17.0 


18.7 


21.2 


23.3 


Allegany 


27.1 


22.2 


20.4 


22.7 


23 


9 


24.9 


19.5 


20.0 


21.0 


21.8 


Anne Arundel 


20.2 


14.4 


13.8 


11.3 


13 


6 


15.4 


16.9 


16.9 


21.2 


25.3 


Baltimore 


21.5 


13.9 


8.1 


6.4 


6 


8 


7.5 


14.5 


18.8 


22.5 


26.1 


Calvert 


26.6 


22.2 


19.8 


21.2 


18 


8 


17.6 


20.6 


21.2 


19.7 


19.5 




23.1 


16.5 


16.6 


15.4 


17 


5 


16.7 


19.5 


17.4 


19.4 


18.3 


Carroll 


22.1 


15.1 


13.0 


10.6 


10 


2 


10.2 


16.5 


17.4 


17.7 


19.3 


Cecil 


22.4 


19.9 


15.7 


16.1 


19 





16.3 


17.7 


18.4 


22.9 


19.3 




23.6 


20.1 


17.2 


17.1 


19 


8 


22.4 


23.2 


20.1 


25.5 


28.1 




26.9 


19.2 


15.5 


14.6 


14 


9 


17.4 


15.3 


15.2 


15.3 


17.8 


Frederick 


25.0 


20.2 


17.6 


17.3 


19 


1 


21.1 


17.2 


16.9 


18.3 


19.9 


Garrett 


28.4 


24.2 


24.3 


21.1 


20 


7 


19.7 


25.8 


24.1 


23.9 


24.1 


Harford 


18.6 


17.8 


14.0 


13.1 


15 


2 


22.7 


16.7 


18.3 


21.0 


28.2 


Howard 


22.8 


14.9 


13.9 


11.5 


12 


5 


11.8 


19.1 


21.2 


22.3 


22.0 


Kent 


21.5 


12.6 


11.8 


16.1 


16 


3 


16.6 


12.6 


17.7 


16.6 


16.4 




20.9 


13.6 


14.9 


11.5 


13 


3 


14.8 


18.7 


20.7 


25.0 


26.5 




20.9 


11.4 


7.5 


4.5 


4 


8 


5.6 


19.2 


19.3 


24.2 


25.9 


Queen Anne's 


21.1 


18.1 


13.1 


11.3 


10 


7 


10.6 


14.6 


15.3 


16.4 


17.6 


St. Mary's 


26.8 


26.7 


25.8 


24.2 


22 


3 


23.4 


25.5 


24.6 


22.7 


23.9 


Somerset 


24.7 


17.9 


14.6 


13.9 


11 


7 


13.1 


14.2 


16.5 


15.7 


17.0 


Talbot 


22.0 


19.4 


16.9 


20.5 


22 


7 


23.1 


13.4 


16.5 


15.8 


16.2 


Washington 


26.9 


20.4 


17.5 


18.3 


20 


6 


21.8 


17.7 


18.4 


20.5 


21.8 




22.3 


18.4 


14.0 


21.8 


22 


8 


25.8 


12.3 


17.0 


16.5 


18.3 


Worcester 


20.0 


15.7 


9.3 


10.7 


12 


1 


13.4 


11.9 


14.5 


16.5 


17.1 


Baltimore City 


25.3 


17.6 


15.4 


18.1 


21 


5 


25.5 


13.7 


14.6 


17.1 


20.0 


Entire State 


24.5 


17.5 


14.9 


15.6 


17 


7 


20.0 


15.5 


16.7 


19.2 


21.8 



Colored 



County Average 


28 


6 


23 


5 


26 


7 


19.8 


20 


2 


20 


6 


22 


9 


24 


9 


26 


.2 


25.4 


Allegany 


29 


3 


18 


7 


15 





25.0 


23 


7 


34 





15 





24.3 


24 


5 


32.4 


Anne Arundel 


29 


1 


25 


6 


20 


2 


19.4 


18 


6 


18 


7 


25 


3 


27 


3 


27 


9 


25.1 


Baltimore 


25.2 


15 


1 


9 


3 


8.9 


8 


7 


10 


6 


16 


8 


22 


1 


22 


6 


21.4 


Calvert 


31 


8 


32 


7 


29 





27.6 


26 


6 


27 


6 


29 





28 





27 


6 


28.0 


Caroline 


26 


1 


24 


5 


20 


7 


25.9 


27 


2 


27 


2 


21 


7 


26 


4 


26 


6 


29.9 


Carroll 


30 


5 


22 


1 


17 


4 


17.2 


13 


7 


25 


1 


19 


7 


21 


5 


18 


9 


31.5 


Cecil 


26.3 


20 


4 


25 


7 


19.6 


24 


9 


19 


6 


25 


3 


20.9 


24 


8 


19.2 




35 


5 


30 


8 


29 


4 


30.1 


34 


3 


29 


8 


31 





35.2 


38 


6 


33.6 


Dorchester 


31 





22 


2 


19 


7 


22.9 


21 


2 


25 


1 


19 


5 


22 


7 


21 


1 


25.2 


Frederick 


29 


6 


26 


1 


19 


8 


24.2 


29 


1 


26 


1 


20 


2 


24 


4 


29 


1 


25.7 


Harford 


19 


2 


29 


1 


20 


1 


19.3 


20 


1 


19 


7 


22 





22 


1 


21 


6 


21.3 


Howard 


30 


3 


20 


2 


21 


3 


18.3 


20 





17 


6 


24 


4 


26 


5 


29 


5 


23.5 


Kent 


29 





23 


4 


19 


4 


21.9 


19 


9 


22 


5 


20 


1 


23 


1 


21 


4 


23.5 




28 


3 


22 


7 


19 


2 


17.3 


19 


5 


17 


4 


21 


5 


22 


6 


26 


3 


22.0 


Prince George's 


27 





21 


7 


17 


9 


10.3 


8 


5 


9 


5 


26 


2 


26 


7 


29 


4 


25.9 


Queen Anne's 


22 


3 


19 


4 


18 


7 


19.3 


17 


7 


20 


3 


18 


9 


20 


2 


20 


2 


23.0 


St. Mary's 


33 


3 


27 


4 


24 


5- 


30.1 


29 


6 


29 


3 


25 





31 


5 


31 


9 


30.5 


Somerset 


31 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


21.5 


22 


5 


20 


7 


23 


4 


23 


9 


25 


9 


22.1 


Talbot 


28 


1 


19 


8 


22 


1 


23.6 


23 


3 


30 


9 


21 


4 


22 





21 


9 


28.2 




19 


7 


13 


4 


12 


6 


20.7 


17 


6 


21 


2 


13 





23 


5 


19 


9 


21.7 




30 


9 


25 


9 


23 


9 


22.6 


28 


2 


28 


4 


21 


5 


20 


1 


24 




23.9 


Worcester 


26 


8 


28 


3 


23 


4 


22.2 


21 


9 


24 





24 





24 


1 


23 


5 


27.5 


Baltimore City 


26 


1 


22 


6 


19 


5 


23.3 


26 


1 


26 


6 


18 


5 


21 


6 


24 


3 


25.1 


Entire State 


27 


5 


23 


1 


20 





21.7 


23 


4 


24 





20 


5 


22 


8 


24 


9 


25.2 



* Prior to 1935, birth rates were calculated on births occurring in the indicated areas and are 
shown under the heading "Recorded Birth Rate^." For 1935, 1940, 1941, and 1942, birth rates are 
shown by residence of mother, as well as for 1935, 1940, 1941, and 1942 according to location of birth. 



Birth Rates; Ratio of High School to Total Enrollment 



29 



TABLE 15 

Ratio of "Number Belonging" in High Schools to "Number Belonging" in 
Elementary and High Schools Combined, for School Year Ending in 
June 1924, 1941, 1942 and 1943 



County 



Schools for White Pupils 



1924 1941 1942 al943 



County 



Schools for Colored Pupils 



1924 1941 1942 al943 



County Average. . 

Caroline 

Worcester 

Kent 

Talbot 

St. Mary's 

Dorchester 

Wicomico 

Somerset 

Carroll 

Queen Anne's .... 

Cecil 

Frederick 

Anne Arundel 

Charles 

Garrett 

Harford 

Allegany x 

Baltimore 

Howard 

Calvert 

Prince George's. . 

Montgomery 

Washington x . . . . 

Baltimore City xj 

Total State 



13.3 

18.8 
18.9 
15.2 
18.7 
3.0 
16.7 
19.9 
15.2 
13.7 
18.3 
14.3 
14.9 
xl0.2 
5.5 
8.4 
14.8 
13.5 
11.0 
12.7 
15.5 
11.6 
13.9 
11.1 

12.1 

13.2 



§26.3 

32.2 
30.3 
30.6 
30.7 
35.6 
29.2 

§29.1 
28.2 
29.0 
27.7 
30.4 
27.1 
29.2 
29.2 
24.5 
27.0 

§26.7 

§26.4 
26.5 
21.0 
25.4 

x23.5 
20.0 

25.2 

§26.0 



§26.0 



32 
32 
31 
31 
35 
30 

§28.8 
28.0 
29.4 
27.9 
30.1 
27.2 
28.4 
28.1 
26.4 
25.9 

§26.3 

§25.7 
24.7 
23.6 
24.2 

x22.5 
19.7 

24.1 

§25.4 



§25.0 

32.8 
32.7 
31.5 
30.4 
30.2 
29.8 

§29.5 
28.9 
28.6 
28.0 
27,7 
27.1 
26.8 
25 
25 
25 

§24 

§24 
24 
23 
23 

x20 
19 



22.3 
§24.0 



County Average 

Wicomico 

Cecil 

Carroll 

Allegany 

Dorchester 

Caroline 

Worcester 

Somerset 

Charles 

Frederick 

Talbot 

Queen Anne's. . . 

Harford 

Montgomery 

Kent 

St. Mary's 

Washington x . . . 
Anne Arundel . . . 

Howard 

Baltimore 

Prince George's. 
Calvert 



Baltimore City x*J 
Total State 



2.0 
6.0 

"4.6 

11.9 
4.7 
2.3 

i!6 
1.8 
6.7 
3.0 
2.0 



2.5 
7.8 



1.5 



9.2 
4.8 



§17.4 

25.2 
23.8 
25.1 
32.6 
22.6 
21.9 
20.2 
16.9 
20.6 
19.8 
19.5 
18.8 
18.0 
16.8 
21.6 
20.1 
17.7 
§12.7 
8.6 
U4.0 
§14.2 
12.4 



*12.3 
§14.9 



§17.6 

25.0 
25.6 
26.7 

x24.5 
22.5 
21.4 
20.9 
18.8 
20.1 
20.1 
20.6 
18.4 
19.7 
17.4 
19.7 
18.8 
14.9 

§14.3 
11.7 

U4.9 

§11.9 
9.9 



•11.8 
§14.5 



§18.0 

27.7 
26.1 
26.0 

x25.0 
24.3 
22.0 
21.3 
20.9 
20.6 
20.6 
20.5 
19.9 
18.6 
18.0 
17.9 
17.4 
17.0 

§15.6 
14.4 

U4.5 

§10.7 
10.3 



*11.3 
§14-4 



§ Includes pupils enrolled in elementary school (s) of State teachers college (s). 

x County has 6-3-3 or 8-4 plan of organization in all or part of schools as against 7-4 or 6-5 plan 
in remaining counties, and Montgomery and Baltimore City have a number of kindergartens. 

* Excludes Baltimore County pupils who attended high schools in Baltimore City at the expense 
of Baltimore County. 

t Vocational and ninth year of junior high schools are included with senior high schools, 
a For number belonging by types of schools, see Table VI, page 207. 

t Includes Baltimore County pupils who attended school in Baltimore City at the expense of 
Baltimore County. 



30 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 16 

Percent of Attendance in White and Colored Elementary Schools for School 
Years Ending in June 1923, 1941, 1942 and 1943 



County 



County Average 

Caroline 

Queen Anne's. . . 

Allegany 

Talbot 

Somerset 

Wicomico 

Frederick 

Dorchester 

Prince George's. 

Carroll 

Worcester 

Kent 

Garrett 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Washington 

Baltimore 

St. Mary's 

Calvert 

Montgomery. . . . 

Charles 

Harford 

Cecil 

Howard 

Baltimore City . 

Total State 



White Schools 



1923 1941 1942 1943 



°84.2 



89.6 
86.4 



°91.7 



t90 
92 
*°93 

f90 
91 

°91 
92 
90 
92 

T92 

t89 
92 
91 
91 

*92. 
t°91 
91. 
91 

*90 
89 

f89 
89. 
90 



*90.3 
91.2 



°91.4 



f93 
91 
*°92 

f93 
92 

°92 
92 
92 
92 

t92 

t91 
92 
90 
91 

*91 
t°91 
92 
90 

*89 
89 

f88 
90 



*90.3 
91.0 



°90.0 

f92.7 
92.2 
*°92.2 

f92.0 
91. 

°91.7 
91.7 
91.3 

t91.3 

f91.1 
90.8 
90.7 
90.3 
89.9 

♦89.4 
t°89.0 
88.9 
88.8 

♦88.6 
88.3 

t87.9 



*87.8 
89.2 



County 



County Average 

Allegany 

Queen Anne's. . 

Washington 

Somerset 

Frederick 

Wicomico 

Caroline 

Talbot 

Dorchester 

Prince George's. 
Anne Arundel . . . 
Montgomery 

Kent 

Baltimore 

Cecil 

Harford 

Worcester 

Howard 

Carroll 

Calvert 

Charles 

St. Mary's 



Baltimore City. 
Total State. . . . 



Colored Schools 



1923 1941 1942 1943 



76.2 

87.4 
73.1 
81.7 
80.5 
84.6 
84.4 
76.4 
84.3 



74 

76 

71 

80 

73 

75 

74 

79.9 

80.1 

71.0 

72.0 

65.3 

66.8 

62.9 



87.0 
79.9 



°87.6 

*92.6 
93.2 

*93.4 
89.8 
90.8 
90.2 
87.8 
90.6 
84.7 

°90.7 

°89.7 
87.2 
89.7 

t88.3 
89.3 
82.8 
82.7 
85.6 

f82.8 
81.8 
81.0 
83.8 



♦87.7 
87.7 



°88.8 

*93.5 
93.5 

*92.8 
91.3 
90.8 
92.6 
91.2 
91.4 
88.5 

°91.1 

°90.6 
87.9 
90.2 

t88.6 
88.9 
86.4 
84.5 
86.4 

t84.9 
82.3 
82.6 
85.4 



*88.3 
88.5 



°86.5 

*94.6 
93.2 

♦91.0 
90.8 
90.7 
90.4 
88.5 
88.1 
88.1 

°88.0 

°87.9 
86.5 
86.5 

t85.8 
84.4 
83.9 
83.2 
82.9 

t81.8 
80.3 
80.2 
79.7 



♦86.8 
86.7 



* Includes junior high schools, grades 7-8. 
f Includes junior high school, grade 7. 
For attendance in 1943 arranged alphabetically and by type of organization, see Table IX, 
page 210. 

Excludes percent of attendance in elementary schools of State teachers colleges: 

State Teachers College 

Frostburg 

Towson 

Salisbury 

Bowie 

Anne Arundel 

Prince George's 



1923 


1941 


1942 


1943 


92.2 


94.8 


93.4 


93.7 


87.4 


91.1 


92.5 


90.4 




93.0 


95.3 


93.8 




95.0 


93.6 


86.1 




91.1 


86.9 


79.4 




96.1 


95.4 


88.1 



> 



Percent of Attendance in Public Elementary Schools 



>OSt-<C-'J<r-iasOCt>00«Or-(OSt~t-COt-OSt- 



c<ie<ieoc<J'-*'-i'-i»Hi-ti~i©©©a5a5a>ooooooooc-«o<o 
csasasasasa>asaso;a>osa>asocccooocooooooooocoo 

+- O +-0 -t— +- * o # -h- 



as as as as as as as as as as as cs as as cs as as os oo as oc oo oo oo 

o 4— o +-o 4- -i— * o * -t- 



eo as eo co t- ti< m co uo co co © cs eo as oo -i-ico •■'tasooco 




>> c ^ C w ■£ ^ "S a; 

U« C 88 fc Qi o " p£j 



o 

Eh 

'i-S 

ffi es 

0) 

o 



iocooocL.oi-iasuweoooi>5r>©a5t>cococ50ot-<N 



ia co uo as t- co tj< co as cs «o i-h t> <n as <n co © co n oo t- 



cot-oow©oscoc-as'«#t-ooco^nt>Tj<co<D«ovnu5coos 



O 0) 



<N »H rH C- rj- CO t> to OS lO W OS t- i-H t> Irt OS 



C u 



t- «o as in oc uo i-i co as © io © oa © cm ^ th cquo 



eo©asast>os^co(Nco(Nt>coi-icoiOi-(c-oo«£>cocNJco 




32 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 18 



An Index of School Attendance in County Elementary Schools,* White and 
Colored, for School Year Ending June 30, 1943 





Percent of 


Rank in Percent of 


County 
















fAttend- 


JLate 


With- 


t Attend- 


JLate 


With- 




ance 


Entrants 


drawals 


ance 


Entrants 


drawals 


White Schools 


County Average 


90.0 


.6 


1.9 








Queen Anne's 


92.6 


.3 


.6 


2 


6 


1 




91.8 


.1 


1.3 


5 


1 


7 




90.9 


.2 


1.0 


10 


3 






91.3 


.5 


1.2 


8 


9 


5 


Calvert 


88.8 




1.2 


18 


2 


4 




92.7 


i!o 


1.2 


1 


19 


6 


Talbot 


92.0 


.8 


1.3 


4 


15 


8 


Anne Arundel 


89.9 


.8 


1.1 


14 


13 


3 


Garrett 


90.3 


.2 


2.0 


13 


4 


16 




91.7 


.4 


2.4 


6 


7 


20 




90.8 


.2 


2.1 


11 


5 


17 




92.2 


.5 


2.9 


3 


10 


23 


Carroll 


91.1 


.9 


1.6 


9 


17 


11 




89.0 


.5 


1.7 


16 


8 


14 


Frederick 


91.7 


.8 


2.1 


7 


14 


18 


Cecil 


86.8 


.6 


1.4 


22 


12 


9 


Kent 


90.7 


1.2 


1.8 


12 


21 


15 


St. Mary's 


88.9 


1.7 


1.5 


17 


23 


10 


Harford 


87.9 


.9 


1.6 


21 


18 


12 


Howard 


86.6 


.9 


1.6 


23 


16 


13 


Montgomery 


88.6 


.5 


2.6 


19 


11 


22 


Washington 


89.4 


1.2 


2.5 


15 


20 


21 




88.3 


1.5 


2.1 


20 


22 


19 



Colored Schools 



County Average 


88 


9 


2 


8 


2 


2 








Queen Anne's 


93 


2 




5 






2 


2 


1 




90 


7 


1 


4 




9 


5 


7 


2 


Allegany 


94 


6 






2 


7 




1 


14 


Wicomico 


90 


4 




6 


2 





6 


3 


9 


Dorchester 


88 




1 


4 


1 


4 


9 


5 


5 


Somerset 


90 


8 


1 


8 


2 


5 


4 


10 


11 


Prince George's 


88 





1 


8 


2 





10 


9 


8 


Carroll 


81 


8 


1 


4 


1 


1 


19 


6 


3 


Washington 


91 





1 


7 


3 





3 


8 


18 




85 


8 


1 


1 


2 


6 


14 


4 


13 


Anne Arundel 


87 


9 


4 


4 


1 


1 


11 


18 


4 


Kent 


86 


5 


2 


4 


i 


9 


13 


13 


7 




82 


9 


3 





i 


5 


18 


16 


6 


Montgomery 


86 


5 


2 


5 


2 


7 


12 


14 


15 


Talbot 


88 


1 


4 


2 


2 


9 


8 


17 


17 


Caroline 


88 


5 


2 


6 


4 


3 


7 


15 


21 


Worcester 


83 


2 


1 


8 


3 


8 


17 


11 


20 


Cecil 


84 


4 


1 


9 


4 


7 


15 


12 


22 


Calvert 


80 


3 


5 


2 


2 


1 


20 


20 


10 


Harford 


83 


9 


4 


8 


3 





16 


19 


19 


Charles 


80 


2 


5 


3 


2 


8 


21 


21 


16 


St. Mary's 


79 


7 


7 


5 


2 


5 


22 


22 


12 



* Excludes elementary schools of State teachers college}. 

t For percent of attendance by counties arranged alphabetically see Table IX, pig? 210. 

t Late entrance for employment, indifference, or neglect. Ths county having the smallest per- 
centage of late entrants is ranked first. 

° Withdrawals for causes other than removal, transfer, commitment to institutions, or death. 
The county having the smallest percentage of withdrawals is ranked first. 



Index of Elementary School Attendance; 
High School Attendance 



33 



TABLE 19 

Percent of Attendance in Maryland High Schools for Year Ending 
June 1923, 1938, 1942 and 1943 



County 



County Average . . 

Wicomico 

Frederick 

Allegany 

Queen Anne's 

Carroll 

Washington 

Somerset 

Prince George's. . . 

Calvert 

Baltimore 

Talbot 

Howard 

Dorchester 

Charles 

Kent 

Anne Arundel 

Montgomery 

Worcester 

Garrett 

St. Mary's 

Harford 

Caroline 

Cecil 

Baltimore City °. . 

Total State 



White High Schools 



1923 1938 1942 1943 



91.5 
91.6 



94.7 

96.0 
96.2 
95.4 
95.2 
95.1 
95.8 
96.0 
95.0 
94.0 
94.6 
93.0 
93.8 
95.4 
94.3 
95.2 
95.1 
93.1 
93.8 
93.5 
93.4 
93.2 
92.5 
93.9 

94.7 

94.7 



93.4 

95.7 
95.3 
94.7 
93.2 
93.9 
94.5 
94.6 
93.7 
93.9 
93.8 
92.8 
93.2 
93.0 
92.8 
92.8 
92.4 
91.9 
91.7 
91.2 
93.1 
91.6 
99.3 
90.6 

93.6 

93.5 



91.5 

94.3 
94.0 
92.8 
92.7 
92.5 
92.4 
92.2 
91.9 
91.8 
91.7 
91.5 
91 .0 
91.0 
90.9 
90.8 
90.6 
90.2 
90.0 
89.8 
89.5 
89.4 
88.9 
87.6 

92.0 

91.7 



County 



County Average 

Allegany 

Frederick 

Wicomico 

Baltimore 

Somerset 

Queen Anne's. . 

Dorchester 

Harford 

Washington 

Carroll 

Anne Arundel . . . 
Prince George's. 

Worcester 

Calvert 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Talbot 

Cecil 

Caroline 

Charles 

Howard 

St. Mary's 



Baltimore City 
Total State 



Colored High Schools 



1923 1938 1942 1943 



89.3 



87 



88 



87 



93.2 

96.1 
95.3 
94.6 

91^6 
94.1 
95.2 
92.1 
92.4 
94.1 
95.4 
91.9 
95.1 
91.9 
91.6 
93.9 
90.9 
89.6 
88.1 
91.6 
87.2 
95.8 



.81 T92.7 
.91 93.0 



For attendance in 1943, for counties arranged alphabetically, see Table IX, page 208. 
* Before 1940, all Baltimore County high school pupils attended schools in Baltimore City, 
t Includes Baltimore County pupils who attended Baltimore City high schools at the expense of 
Baltimore County. 

° T nclude3 pupils in vocational schools and ninth grade in junior high schools. 



34 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

CHART 1 



NUMBER OF BOYS AND GIRLS ENROLLED* BY GRADES 
IN MARYLAND COUNTY SCHOOLS, YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1943 



COLORED 

IE 

1.7261 



Total 

1942 

1943 



3878 
3687 




11,318 
10.950 



[^1.039 


1857 
1865 




1450 
1422 


442 1 


1019° 


646 


1088 


331° ■ 
478° || 


736° 
809? 


2.154 
3.030 


5062 
5184 



13472 27690 
13.980 27452 



Kgn 
1 



J16089 
*16725 1*7.72 



3313 


2 


1 7997 • 




3338 




wmmm 


3351 

3257 


3 




mm 


3324 
3332 


4 




—J 



5 
6 
7 
8 

Special 
Classes 

Total 



14434 
14465 7068 



14328 
14349 7087 g 



140931 

14328 ["7177^ 



1,6 9 Z • I 



1345 
1358] 

107583 56,825 
109371 52.546 



I 

II 

III 

IV 

Total 
High 

Grand 
Total 



12496 
12543 

10440 
10087 

8804 
8579 



6,072 



4.621 



5 



ESS 

| 4.864 



*7576 

*7185 1»4,054^ 

39316 17 539 
38394 20.855 

146899 74.364 
147765 73.401 



t Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death and commitment to institution. 
Includes pupils enrolled in elementary schools of State teachers colleges. 
J Includes enrollment in junior first grade. 

* Includes 20 boys and 41 girls in 1942 and 10 boys and 14 girls in 1943, who were 
post-graduates. 

° Includes 23 pupils from Baltimore County who received instruction in Baltimore City 
high schools at the expense of Baltimore County. 



Grade Enrollment Public Schools 



35 



Grand 
Total 




>ol Pupils in 


Total 
High 


39,316 
38,394 

3,932 
2,575 
6,299 
248 
814 
1,771 
1,245 
590 
940 
2,353 
1,183 
1,546 

3,076 
3,875 
485 
433 
636 
612 
2,552 
1,232 
771 

fl6,867 

4^725 
10,567 
1,575 

55,261 


III 


hj* -H • -eOOOH ;«>;•• : iH«N ; • ; ; <M ; ; 09 K> • • • lO • £ 


Vhite High Schc 
Year 


> 




3 


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0000 ' CO CO JH 


1 


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10,440 
10,087 

1, 706 
1,649 
81 
208 
473 
324 
154 

600 
322 
395 
166 
121 
822 
1,045 
120 
114 
155 
163 
691 

225 

4,141 

4^141 
14,228 






II SS3^333SSSSS3i§23SSS3S 1 : H : I 




Total 
Elemen- 
tary 


107,063 
*§108,893 

*10,795 

*18',156 
787 
1,559 
4,282 
3,068 
1,627 
2,130 

3^263 
4,369 
2,197 
1,042 
11,290 
12,257 
1,185 
989 
1,474 
1,361 
9,985 
*2,759 
1,533 

t58,442 
44,609 
3,063 
10,770 

167,335 




Special 
Classes 


|S 2£ : : : iSSgSSS g :§ : : : § 

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14,342 
14,378 

1,220 
973 

2,470 
98 
251 
619 
422 
232 
304 
830 
431 
604 
267 
160 

1,304 

1,642 
162 
147 
215 
202 

1,231 
390 
204 

6,413 
6,413 

20,791 


I 

H 


»* 


14,310 
14,186 

1,216 
892 

2,456 
127 
195 
551 
400 
222 
278 
816 
466 
585 
307 
146 

1,271 

1,675 
173 
135 
212 
210 

1,265 
370 
218 

6,370 
6,370 

20,556 


White 


0? 


II §§8-S§SSS3381Si2SSS8iSS II i \ i i 1 

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as 

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14,282 
14,977 

1,329 
926 

2,757 
101 
228 
623 
456 
239 
277 
863 
492 
635 
307 
110 

1,383 

1,856 
175 
152 
195 
194 

1,098 
385 
196 

7,271 
7,271 

22,248 


S3 




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Kin- 
der- 
garter 


ll ii^iiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiii; Hi;;; I 


County 


Total Counties, 

1942 

♦1943 

Anne Arundel 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Federick 

Harford 

Howard 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

Talbot 

Worcester 

Baltimore Cityf 

Elementary 

Occupational 

Junior High 

Senior High 

Vocational 

Total State 



J 



I 



s?8h- I 
a 

SSh 



. ... 1 
1 l! 

Ii 



;82 



I 



I 

P i 
III 



II 



36 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



II 



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Colored Grade Enrollment; Elementary School Graduates 37 
and Non-Promotions 

TABLE 22 

County White and Colored Elementary School Graduates and Non-Promotions 



Year 


Number 


TPercent 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


*°§County White Elementary School Graduates 


1923 






3,200 


4,136 


7,336 


6.1 


8.5 


7.2 


1925 , 






3,705 


4,549 


8,254 


7.0 


9.4 


8.1 


1927 






4,290 


5,059 


9,349 


8.1 


10.3 


9.1 


1929 






4,742 


5,186 


9,928 


8.9 


10.4 


9.6 


1931 






4,757 


5,156 


9,913 


8.7 


10.2 


9.4 


1933 






5,121 


5,653 


10,774 


9.1 


10.9 


10.0 


1935 






5,190 


5,719 


10,909 


9.3 


11.1 


10.1 


1937 






5,292 


5,703 


10,995 


9.6 


11.2 


10.4 


1939 






5,845 


6,080 


11,925 


10.6 


12.0 


11.3 


1940 






5,901 


6,266 


12,167 


10.8 


12.4 


11.6 


1941 






5,845 


6,423 


12,268 


10.7 


12.6 


11.6 


1942. 






5,921 


6,493 


12,414 


10.7 


12.6 


11.6 


xl943, 






5,765 


6,367 


12,132 


10.2 


12.2 


11.2 



§County Colored Elementary School Graduates 



1923 


350 


637 


987 


2.3 


4.3 


3.3 


1925 


487 


705 


1,192 


3.4 


5.0 


4.2 


1927 


542 


909 


1,451 


4.0 


6.8 


5.4 


1929 


733 


1,077 


1,810 


5.5 


8.4 


6.9 


1931 


884 


1,101 


1,985 


6.7 


8.6 


7.6 


1933 


805 


1,105 


1,910 


6.1 


8.6 


7.4 


1935 


874 


1,190 


2,064 


6.9 


9.7 


8.2 


1937 


793 


1,130 


1,923 


6.5 


9.7 


8.1 


1939 


909 


1,100 


2,009 


7.6 


9.6 


8.6 


1940 


944 


1,178 


2,122 


8.0 


10.4 


9.2 


1941 


881 


1,134 


2,015 


7.5 


10.2 


8.8 


1942 


919 


1,115 


2,034 


8.0 


10.0 


9.0 


1943 


920 


1,223 


2,143 


8.1 


11.2 


9.6 



♦JCounty White Elementary School Pupils Not Promoted 



1923 


13,435 


8,586 


22,021 


25.6 


17.5 


21.7 


1925 


10,673 


6,336 


17,009 


20.2 


13.0 


16.8 


1927 


9,954 


6,134 


16,088 


18.7 


12.4 


15.6 


1929 


9,147 


5,609 


14,756 


17.1 


11.3 


14.3 


1931 


9,231 


5,293 


14,524 


16.8 


10.4 


13.7 


1933 


10,503 


6,244 


16,747 


18.6 


12.0 


15.4 


1935 


9,283 


5,447 


14,730 


16.5 


10.5 


13.6 


1937 


9,200 


5,390 


14,590 


16.6 


10.5 


13.7 


1939 


7,571 


4,198 


11,769 


13.7 


8.2 


11.1 


1940 


7,253 


3,822 


11,075 


13.2 


7.5 


10.5 


1941 


6,949 


3,736 


10,685 


12.7 


7.3 


10.1 


1942 


6,753 


3,534 


10,287 


12.2 


6.9 


9.6 


1943 


7,404 


3,851 


11,255 


13.1 


7.4 


10.3 



JCounty Colored Elementary School Pupils Not Promoted 



1923 


5,722 


4,616 


10,338 


38.3 


31.1 


34.7 


1925 


4,800 


3,700 


8,500 


33.2 


26.3 


29.8 


1927 


4,015 


3,091 


7,106 


29.5 


23.3 


26.4 


1929 


3,230 


2,361 


5,591 


24.2 


18.5 


21.4 


1931 


2,929 


2,022 


4,951 


22.4 


15.8 


19.1 


1933 


3,041 


2,230 


5,271 


23.2 


17.4 


20.3 


1935 


2,848 


1,959 


4,807 


22.4 


15.9 


19.2 


1937 


2,601 


1,753 


4,354 


21.5 


15.0 


18.3 


1939 


2,604 


1,705 


4,309 


21.7 


14.9 


18.4 


1940 


2,335 


1,512 


3,847 


19.8 


13.3 


16.6 


1941 


2,196 


1,467 


3,663 


18.9 


13.2 


16.1 


1942 


2,292 


1,353 


3,645 


20.0 


12.3 


16.2 


1943 


2,451 


1,440 


3.891 


21.7 


13.2 


17.6 



t Percent of total elementary enrollment, exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, com- 
mitment, and death, who graduated or were not promoted. 

* Includes seventh or eighth grade promotions in junior high schools a3 graduates and seventh 
or seventh and eighth grade non-promotions in junior high schools as non-promotion3. 

; In obtaining percentages, kindergarten enrollmant is excluded. 

§ In obtaining percentages, enrollmant in elementary school (s) of State teachers college(s) is 
included. 

t Enrollment in elementary school(3) of State teachers colle^e(s) is excluded, but klnd^r^-t'in 
is included. 

x Excludes 6 boys and 3 girls from special classes who received certificates. 



38 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 2 



PERCENT OF GRADUATES IN 1943 
COUNTY WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENROLLMENT* 



Number 



County- 


Boys 


Girls 


Total and 
Co. Average 


5,765 


6,367 


Caroline 


108 


110 


Dorchester 


136 


159 


Frederick 


409 


415 


Worcester 


100 


104 


Kent 


DO 


72 


Calvert 


01 


53 


Carroll 


269 


280 


St. Mary* b 


60 


66 


Queen Anne's 


61 


88 


Anne Arundel 


398 


438 


Talbot 


88 


78 


Wi coral cot 


170 


176 


Prince George' 


71 1 
B ' X - L 


761 


Charles 


87 


107 


Garrett 


181 


205 


Somerset 


74 


97 


Cecil 


164 


186 


Harford 


213 


267 


Baltimoret 


892 


992 


Washington** 


467 


507 


Allegany*tt 


494 


574 


Montgomery** 


449 


503 


Howard 


117 


129 



Percent ggHlf Percent 
Boys ICUCa Girls 



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° Enrollment in kindergarten (s) excluded in obtaining percentage. 

x Excludes 6 boys and 3 girls from special classes who received certificates. 

t Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, commitment to institution, or death, and 
includes promotions from grade 7 in counties having 6-5 plan, and from grade 8 in counties 
having 6-3-3 or 8-4 plan of organization. 

f Enrollment in elementary school of State teachers college included. 

* County has 6-3-3 or 8-4 plan of organization. 



Percent of Graduates in 1943 Elementary School Enrollment 39 



CHART 3 



County 

Total and 
Co. Avereget 

Carroll 
Kent 

Queen Anne* 8 

Frederick 

Wicomico 

Dorchester 

Allegany** 

Cecil 

Somerset 

Montgomery 

Washington** 

Harford 

Charles 

Howard 

Talbot 

Worcester 

Caroline 

St. Mary's 

Calvert 

Anne Arundelt 

Prince George' st 

Baltimore 



PERCENT OF GRADUATES IN 1943 COUNTY COLORED 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ENEOLLMENTt 



Number 
Boys Girls 



Percent 
Girls 



920 
22 
37 
29 
41 
46 
59 

5 
21 
54 
84 

7 
39 



1223 [J 
21 
50 
39 



Percent 
Boys 



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11.8 

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87 l~ 

711 

102 



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* 10.0 I 



19 



37 




t Includes pupils at elementary school of State teachers college at Bowie. 
* County haf 6-6 plan of organization. 

% Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, commitment to institution, or death and 
includes promotions from grade 7 in counties having 6-5 plan and from grade 8 in counties 
having 6-6 plan of organization. 



40 



1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 
CHART 4 



NUMBER AND PERCENT OF COUNTY WHITE ELE-ffilTTARY 
AND JUNIOR HIGH PUPILS THROUGH GRADE 8 NOT PROMOTED , * 1943 



County 



Number 
Boys Girls 



Percent Boys 



Percent Girls 



Total and 
Co. Average 


7404 


3851 


Washington 


279 


165 


Carroll 


130 


77 


Frederick 


228 


118 


Montgomery 


503 


239 ' 


Cecil 


171 


101 


Prince George's 


706 


380 


Queen Anne's 


79 


37 


Talbot 


83 


52 


Caroline 


109 


49 


Garrett 


238 


108 


Wore ester 


118 


49 


Somerset 


95 


66 


Dorchester 


176 


66 


Anne Arundel 


506 


291 


Kent 


93 


32 


Harford 


354 


174 


Howard 


182 


84 


Allegany 


891 


417 


Calvert 


72 


24 


Wicomico 


247 


117 


St. Mary's 


99 


49 


Charles 


170 


75 


Baltimore 


1866 


1075 




• 13.1 












■ 








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* Includes pupils in kindergartens and special classes considered not ready for advance- 
ment. 

Pupils in elementary schools of teachers colleges in Allegany, Baltimore and Wicomico 
Counties are excluded. 



Elementary School Pupils Not Promoted 
CHART 5 



41 



NUMBER AND PERCENT OF COUNTY COLORED ELEMENTARY PUPILS 
NOT PROMOTED - 1943 



County 



Number 
Boys Girls 



Peroent 
Boys 



Peroent 
Girls 



Total and 
Co. Average 


2451 


1440 


Q. A. 


7 


4 


Wash. 


5 


8 


Fred. 


37 


23 


Ceo. 


21 


12 


Dor. 


75 


34 


Mont. 


116 


58 


Wor. 


77 


47 


Caas. 


94 


70 


Talb. 


65 


30 


Som. 


108 


35 


Harf. 


62 


37 


All. 


16 


11 


Caro. 


59 


27 


Carr. 


22 


20 


Kent 


65 


31 


St. M. 


82 


39 


How. 


64 


36 


Wic. 


124 


80 


P. Geo.* 


410 


273 


A. A.* 


434 


258 


Calv. 


178 


103 


Balto. 


330 


204 



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223 
22.8 

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20.9 

24.6 
27.1 

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33 7 



* Excludes pupils in elementary school of State Teachers College at Bowie. 



42 



1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 6 



non-promotions* by grades in county elementary and 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS THROUGH GRADE 8 FOR YEAR ENDING IN JUNE, 1943 



Percent Boys 

COLORED 



No. 

Boys 
Girls 



573 
380 



375 
12.9 | 209 



295 
185 



V 






EZ9 342 






Ml 


11.5 | 188 




:60 
10-4 \ 145 



263 



334 
186 



2 
3 



No. 
Boys 
Girls 

1739 
965 



1126 
525 1 75 g 



Percent Girls 
WHITE 



19.7 


1 


E5» 





783 
434 




1005 
503 | 70 



* Excludes pupils in kindergartens and special classes not considei^ed ready for advance- 
ment. Also pupils in elementary school classes at the four State teachers colleges are excluded. 



Non-Promotions by Grade; First Grade Non-Promotions by County 43 



TABLE 23 

Number and Percent of Non-Promotions in First Grade* in Maryland 
County White and Colored Schools, 1943 



County 



Total Counties: 

1941 

1942 

1943 

Carroll 

Washington .... 

Howard 

Frederick 

Caroline 

Montgomery . . . 
Queen Anne's. . 

Talbot 

Somerset 

Prince George's. 

Wicomico 

Dorchester. . . . 

Worcester 

Anne Arundel . . 

St. Mary's 

Garrett 

Charles 

Harford 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Kent 

Allegany 

Cecil 



White Schools 
First Grade Non-Promotions 



Number 



Boys 



1,666 
1,591 
1,739 

18 
52 
22 
83 
18 

137 
17 
18 
19 

215 
39 
45 
22 

118 
15 
66 
37 
88 

381 
20 
20 

220 



Girls 



954 
935 
965 

5 
34 
14 
28 
7 
72 
11 
13 
15 

112 
20 
11 
15 
68 
10 
48 
21 
64 

211 
9 
10 

118 
49 



Percent 



Boys 



20.5 
18.9 
19.7 

5.6 
8.4 
14.2 
17.9 
15.1 
16.3 
16.5 
17.6 
13.9 
19.2 
22.8 
25.3 
22.9 
20.9 
20.3 
20.2 
23.0 



Girls 



13.2 
12.7 
12.7 



6.1 
9.1 
6.4 
8.4 
9.9 
12.9 
12.3 
16.9 
12.2 
10.8 
7.8 
13.4 
14.4 
15.6 
16.9 
15.0 
18.0 
15.5 
17.0 
15.9 
16.8 
20.3 



County 



Total Counties: 

1941 

1942 

1943 

Queen Anne's. . 
Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Washington 

Somerset 

Allegany 

St. Mary's 

Cecil 

Worcester 

Kent 

Talbot 

Carroll 

Charles 

Montgomery. . . 

Wicomico 

Caroline 

Harford 

Prince George's 

Howard 

Anne Arundel . . 

Calvert 

Baltimore 



Colored Schools 
First Grade Non-Promotions 



Number 



Boys 



566 
536 
573 

2 
11 

8 

2 
19 

2 
14 

4 
21 
15 
21 

5 
36 
37 
18 
13 
18 
79 
15 
114 
43 
76 



Girls 



394 
334 
380 

1 

8 
7 
3 
12 
2 
5 
6 
13 
6 
7 
4 
29 
21 
12 
7 
12 
54 
10 
72 
30 
59 



Percent 



* Excludes pupils in first grade of elementary schools of State teachers colleje3. 



44 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 24 

Causes for Non-Promotion of County White Elementary Pupils Not Pro- 
moted by Year, 1929 to 1943, and by County for Year Ending June 30, 1943 



Percent of Pupils Not Promoted by Cause 



Year 
County 



Total 
Not 
Promoted 





late Home 
ons and 
' Interest 


[ncapacity 


Illness 


• At- 
;e Not 
Sickness 


from 
r School 


■s or Over, 
ed 


trance and 
Vithdrawal 


All Caus 


Unfortui 
Conditi 
Lack oi 


Mental ] 


Personal 


Irregular 
tend an < 
Due to 


Transfer 
Anothe 


§j? 

>h a 


ST 



By Year 



1929 


14,731 


14.3 


4.3 


2.5 


1.9 


2 





.8 


1.1 


.4 


1.3 


1930 


14,311 


13.8 


4.5 


2.7 


1.7 


1 


5 


.8 


1.0 


.3 


1.3 


1931 


14,505 


13.8 


4.8 


2.7 


1.6 


1 


2 


.8 


.8 


.3 


1.6 


1932 


15,251 


14.3 


5.4 


2.7 


1.8 


1 


2 


.8 


.7 


.3 


1.4 


1933 


16,727 


15.5 


5.8 


3.1 


1.5 


1 


3 


.8 


.7 


.2 


2.1 


1934 


17,818 


16.6 


5.8 


3.3 


2.4 


1 


5 


.9 


.6 


.2 


1.9 


1935.. 


14,709 


13.7 


4.7 


2.5 


1.9 


1 


3 


.7 


.8 




1.7 


1936 


14,751 


13.8 


4.9 


2.3 


1.7 


1 


4 


.7 


.8 


.1 


1.9 


1937 


14,575 


13.7 


5.0 


2.1 


1.8 


1 


3 


.8 


.9 


.1 


1.7 


1938 


12,520 


11.9 


4.5 


1.8 


1.4 


1 





.7 


.7 


.3 


1.5 


1939 


11,759 


11.1 


4.6 


1.6 


1.2 




9 


.7 


.5 


.2 


1.4 


1940 


11,057 


10.5 


4.2 


1.6 


1.1 




9 


.7 


.5 


.2 


1.3 


1941* 


10,685 


10.1 


3.8 


1.3 


1.1 


1 





.6 


.6 


.2 


1.5 


1942* 


10,287 


9.6 


3.7 


1.1 


1.1 


1 





.6 


.6 


.2 


1.3 


1943* 


11,255 


10.3 


3.9 


1.1 


1.1 


1 


3 


.6 


.6 


.2 


1.5 



By County, 1943 



Washington 


444 


4.4 


1 


7 


.3 


.4 




8 


.1 


.9 


.1 


.1 


Carroll 


207 


4.8 


1 


6 


1.6 


.6 




4 


.1 


.4 




.1 


Frederick 


346 


5.7 


3 


2 


.3 


.6 




6 


.4 


.4 


*.i 


.1 


Montgomery 


742 


6.6 


2 


1 


.8 


.8 




9 


.3 


.5 


.2 


1.0 


Cecil 


272 


8.9 


3 





.9 


1.5 


1 





.4 


.7 


.2 


1.2 


Prince George's 


1,086 


8.9 


3 


3 


1.6 


1.4 




6 


.6 


.2 


.2 


1.0 


Queen Anne's 


116 


9.8 


6 


6 




1.2 




3 


.8 


.2 




.7 


Talbot 


135 


9.9 


4 


9 


1.7 


1.2 




5 


.6 


.3 


!5 


.2 


Caroline 


158 


10.1 


3 


1 


1.2 


.9 


1 


3 


.4 


.4 




2.8 




346 


10.6 


5 





1.1 


1.9 


1 





.3 


.3 


.2 


.8 




167 


10.9 


4 


2 


2.7 


1.0 






.3 


1.1 




1.6 


Somerset 


161 


10.9 


5 


2 


1.6 


1.2 


1 


2 


.4 


.2 


.3 


.8 


Dorchester 


242 


11.4 


5 


4 


1.0 


.5 




9 


.6 


.7 


.1 


2.2 


Anne Arundel 


797 


11.9 


4 


8 


2.0 


.8 


1 


9 


.8 


.3 


.3 


1.0 


Kent 


125 


12.0 


5 


9 


1.1 


2.1 


1 


2 




.4 


.2 


1.1 


Harford 


528 


12.1 


4 


4 


.6 


1.3 


2 


3 


i!i 


.8 


.3 


1.3 




266 


12.1 


4 


6 


1.4 


1.0 


2 


7 


1.0 


.9 


.2 


.3 


Allegany* 


1,308 


12.1 


3 


1 


2.0 


.9 


1 


6 


.3 


1.0 


.2 


3.0 


Calvert 


96 


12.2 


5 


5 


1.0 


.8 


1 


5 


.3 


.6 


.1 


2.4 


Wicomico* 


364 


13.2 


4 


9 


2.8 


1.8 




.5 


.8 


1.4 


.1 


.9 


St. Mary's 


148 


15.0 


3 


9 




1.0 


3 


2 


3.4 


.8 


.1 


2.6 


Charles 


245 


15.1 


6 





2.6 


1.4 


1 


7 


1.5 


.6 


.4 


.9 




2,941 


16.2 


6 


3 


.2 


1.8 


2 


4 


1.1 


.8 


.4 


3.2 



t 13 years, 1929 to 1931, inclusive. 

* Excludes pupils attending the elementary schools of State teachers colleges. 



Causes for Non-Promotion of Elementary School Pupils 



45 



TABLE 25 



Causes for Non-Promotion of County Colored Elementary Pupils by Year, 
1929 to 1943, and by County for Year Ending June 30, 1943 



Year and 
County 


♦Total 

Not 
Promoted 


Percent of Pupils Not Promoted py Cause 


All Causes 


Unfortunate Home 
Conditions and Lack 
of Interest 


Mental 
Incapacity 


Personal 
Illness 


Irregular Attendance 
Not Due to 
Sickness 


14 Years or Over, 
Employed 


Transfer from 
Another School 


Late Entrance 


Other Causes 


By Year 


1929 


5,588 


20.4 


5.5 


1.6 


2.3 


5.8 


U.8 


.5 


1.3 


1.6 


1930 


5,643 


21.1 


7.0 


1.7 


2.6 


5.1 


tl.6 


.7 


.9 


1.5 


1931 


4,932 


18.5 


5.8 


1.8 


2.4 


4.4 


tl.4 


.5 


1.0 


1.2 


1932 


4,952 


18.7 


6.6 


1.7 


2.4 


4.3 


1.2 


.3 


.8 


1.4 


1933 


5,266 


19.8 


7.8 


1.8 


1.8 


4.4 


1.1 


.4 


.8 


1.7 


1934 


5,310 


20.8 


7.3 


1.7 


2.2 


6.2 


1.2 


.5 


.5 


1.2 


1935 


4,797 


19.2 


6.4 


1.9 


2.1 


5.0 


1.3 


.5 


.5 


1.5 


1936 


4,660 


19.1 


6.7 


1.4 


2.0 


5.3 


1.3 


.6 


.5 


1.3 


1937 


4,350 


18.3 


6.6 


1.4 


2.4 


4.4 


1.3 


.5 


.4 


1.3 


1938 


4,484 


19.2 


7.9 


1.3 


1.7 


4.0 


1.2 


.7 


.7 


1.7 


1939 


4,303 


18.5 


8.5 


1.4 


1.6 


3.7 


.9 


.5 


.6 


1.3 


1940 


4,832 


16.6 


7.7 


.9 


1.5 


3.2 


1.0 


.8 


.6 


.9 


1941 


3,663 


16.1 


7.0 


.9 


1.8 


3.0 


1.0 


.7 


.5 


1.2 


1942 


3,645 


16.2 


7.5 


.9 


1.4 


3.1 


.9 


.6 


.4 


1.4 


1943 


3,891 


17.6 


7.5 


.9 


1.5 


4.4 


1.0 


.5 


.3 


1.5 



By County, 1943 



Queen Anne's 


11 


2.2 


1.0 




.8 


.4 










Washington 


13 


5.8 


2.7 




1.3 


.5 


i'.3 








Frederick 


60 


8.8 


7.1 




.7 


.9 


.1 








Cecil 


33 


9.4 


5.1 






3.4 






.3 


.6 




109 


10.3 


6.5 


' ' .2 


' ".6 


.8 


i".i 




.2 


.9 


Montgomery 


174 


10.8 


4.7 




.8 


3.2 


.7 


.4 


.3 


.7 




124 


11.3 


4.5 


*i'.3 


1.4 


.2 


2.8 


.2 


.2 


.7 


Charles 


164 


12.1 


3.1 


.8 


.8 


5.8 


.3 


.1 


.6 


.6 


Talbot 


95 


12.6 


4.5 


1.8 


1.5 


2.9 


.4 


.3 


.3 


.9 


Somerset 


143 


12.7 


5.5 


1.3 


1.2 


2.5 


.5 


.4 


.5 


.8 


Harford 


99 


13.8 


5.7 




1.5 


3.6 


1.7 


.6 


.7 


Allegany 


27 


15.0 


6.5 




2.2 


2.2 


.6 


.6 


1.1 


2.8 




86 


15.6 


7.2 




1.5 


2.2 


.9 






3.8 


Carroll 


42 


16.3 


7.0 


i.5 


.4 


6.6 


.8 






Kent 


96 


16.3 


11.0 


.5 


1.4 


1.7 


1.4 






'".a 




121 


17.1 


4.1 


.2 


.8 


6.9 


1.7 


"'.8 


".2 


2.4 


Howard 


100 


17.5 


8.9 


.7 


1.1 


4.4 


.5 


.7 


.7 


.5 




204 


18.8 


10.0 


3.8 


1.8 


.8 


1.1 


.7 


.2 


.4 


Prince George's 


683 


23.3 


10.0 


1.9 


2.3 


4.4 


1.0 


1.3 


.3 


2.1 


Anne Arundel 


692 


24.1 


10.5 


.6 


1.9 


6.6 


.8 


.4 


.4 


2.9 


Calvert 


281 


26.0 


8.5 


1.9 


.7 


11.7 


1.5 


.5 


.1 


1.1 


Baltimore 


534 


28.2 


10.6 


.3 


2.4 


8.4 


1.5 


1.3 


.2 


3.5 



t Thirteen years or over, employed. 

* Excludes pupils at elementary school, Bowie State Teachers College. 



46 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 26 — Program for Education of Physically Handicapped Children 
in Maryland Financed with State Funds in 1942-43 



County 



Home Teaching 



Pupils 



Teach 
ers 



Expendi- 
tures 



Transportation 
to Regular Class 



Pupils 



Expendi- 
tures 



Special Instruction 
n Hospital Schools 



Pupils 



Expendi- 
tures 



Total 



Expendi- 



Pupils 


tures 


148 


$8,197.89 


29 


1,780.70 


10 


294.41 


19 


2,132.81 




227 86 


3 


167.20 


7 


452.55 


5 


33.00 


4 


163.00 


2 


97.16 


2 




7 


234.61 


5 


286.01 


4 


118.30 


13 


525.66 


7 


382 . 50 


*5 


215.00 


1 


75.50 


1 


76.00 


9 


322.89 


8 


573 . 13 


1 


39.60 


306 


10,000.00 






454 


$18,197.89 



Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore. . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick. . . . 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Pr. George's. . . 
Queen Anne's. 
St. Mary's. 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Balto. City. . . , 

Total State 



|191 
267 



58 



$5,390.73 

670.70 
294.41 
1,295.01 



$1,989.61 
1,110.00 
'20.25 



227.86 
167.20 
452.55 

33.00 
163.00 

97.16 



234.61 
148.41 
118.30 
447.60 
220.50 



137.60 



259.29 
521.53 
39.60 

3,135.00 

$8,525.73 



tl4 

43 



78.06 
162.00 



215.00 
75.50 
76.00 
63.60 
51.60 



1,599.75 
$3,589.36 



ab43 

ab5 
b5 
b2 
bl 
b2 
bl 

ab2 
b4 
bl 

ab2 
b4 
bl 
b2 
a2 
b2 

b2 



ab3 
b2 



ablOl 
144 



$817.55 



a817.55 



b5,265.25 
$6,082.80 



a Expenditures for teaching 7 children at the Rehabilitation Institute, Reisterstown, include 
one child each from Allegany, Cecil, Garrett, Washington, and Baltimore City, and two from Mont- 
gomery, the children being shown opposite the individual county and Baltimore City. 

b The four teachers, for whom reimbursement of $5,265.25 was paid, instructed 100 Baltimore 
City and 37 county children under treatment in the hospital schools, who are shown opposite tha 
individual county and Baltimore City. 

c The remainder of the $20,000 State appropriation was spent for testing hard-of-hearing children 
in county schools ($1,000.00), therapeutic aids and other services for children in county schools 
($636.42), publishing a bulletin on the conservation of hearing ($131.13), and administrative expenses 
($34.56). 

* Includes one colored child. 

t Includes 83 colored children who received home instruction from two teachers, and 2 colored 
pupils who received special transportation facilities paid for from state funds. 

In June 1943 a ten-page bulletin entitled "Conservation of 
Hearing Program for Maryland County Schools" was prepared 
to give practical suggestions to persons interested in the children 
having actual or potential hearing impairments. For five years 
the Maryland State School for the Deaf and the State Depart- 
ment of Education have conducted a continuous audiometer test- 
ing program in the Maryland county public schools to detect the 
children with impaired hearing. For these children medical aid 
is necessary to examine, diagnose and recommend treatments. 
The school program for such children may be helped by special 
seating, training in lip reading, or attendance at the State School 
for the Deaf. The bulletin gives help for teacher, parents and 
child. 

Montgomery County has had a teacher of lip reading for a 
number of years and the bulletin is the result of her experience. 



State Aid for Physically and Mentally Handicapped Children 47 



TABLE 27 



Special Classes for Retarded Children in Counties, 1942-1943 





White 


Colored 


County 






Average 






Average 




Number 


Enroll- 


Enroll- 


NumbGr 


Enroll- 


Enroll- 




of 


ment 


ment Per 


of 


ment 


ment Per 




Classes 




Class 


Classes 




Class 


....... 

Total 1940-1941 


*61 


*1,275 


20.9 


3 


75 


25.0 


1941-1942 


*63 


*1,345 


21.3 


3 


71 


23.7 


1942-1943 


*68 


*1,358 


20.0 


2 


51 


25.5 


Allegany 


*21 


310 


14.8 








Anne Arundel 


4 


57 


14.3 








Caroline 


3 


67 


22.3 








Carroll 


t3 


42 


14.0 








Cecil 


2 


47 


23.5 








Dorchester 


1 


17 


17.0 










2 


69 


34.5 










2 


46 


23.0 










2 


46 


23.0 








Montgomery 


1 


27 


27.0 










5 


93 


18.6 










1 


21 


21.0 








Talbot 


2 


38 


19.0 










J12 


329 


27.4 










4 


91 


22.8 


"n 


"5i 


25.5 




3 


58 


19.3 







* Six of these are in one school. Eight classes for seventh and eighth grade pupils at Allegany 
and Fort Hill High Schools are excluded. 

t One school had two classes. % Two schools had two classes. 



Baltimore City had 4 white and 2 colored teachers who gave 
home instruction to 29 white boys and 56 white girls and to 50 
colored boys and 18 colored girls too physically handicapped to 
attend school. These figures exclude pupils taught at home who 
were enrolled in school earlier in the year. (See Table 26.) 
Training in lip reading was given to 226 white and 27 colored 
City pupils in the regular grades in addition to those who were 
in hearing conservation classes. There were 804 white and 567 
colored City pupils in the regular grades who received training 
in speech correction. Two hundred and seventy white City pupils 
who formerly would have been enrolled in open air classes were 
taught in regular classes, but were given food and rest periods 
daily. 



48 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 28 



Baltimore City Special Classes, Day Camp, and Crafts School for Girls 
Semester Ending June 30, 1943 













Promoted or 












§ Making Satisfactory 




Number 




Average 


Percent 


Improvement 


Kind of Class 


of 


Net Roll 


Net Roll 


of Attend- 








Classes 






ance 
















Number 


Percentt 



Physically Handicapped White Pupils 



Total and Average 


26 


472 


484 


87.5 


382 


80.9 


Open Air 


2 


48 


46 


90.7 


30 


62.5 


Orthopedic 


11 


210 


220 


89.7 


165 


78.6 


Sight Conservation 


4 


74 


74 


78.9 


59 


79.7 


Hearing Conservation 


4 


62 


62 


88.7 


51 


82.3 


Deaf 


2 


23 


22 


86.4 


23 


100.0 


Mixed* 


3 


55 


60 


86.7 


54 


98.2 


Socially Handicapped White Pupils 


Dav Camp for Boys 


1 


53 


49 


79.1 






Crafts School for Girls 


1 


14 


15 


73.3 






Physically Handicapped Colored Pupils 


Total and Average 


8 


177 


178 


84.2 


127 


71.8 


Sight Conservation 


3 


74 


75 


79.7 


56 


75.7 


Orthopedic. . 


3 


66 


65 


89.2 


48 


72.7 


Open Air 


1 


22 


22 


86.4 


14 


63.6 


Deaf 


1 


15 


16 


81.3 


9 


60.0 


Mentally Handicapped White Pupils 


Total and Average 


109 


2,879 


2,881 


78.5 


2,382 


82.7 




74 


1,975 


1,864 


81.8 


1,635 


82.8 




1 


21 


21 


85.7 


18 


85.7 


Shop Center 


34 


883 


996 


72.3 


729 


82.6 


Mentally Handicapped Colored Pupils 


Total and Average 


85 


2,109 


1,941 


75.2 


1,539 


73.0 


Opportunity 


50 


1,267 


1,249 


78.9 


969 


76.5 


Special Center 


5 


86 


83 


77.8 


53 


61.6 




30 


756 


609 


69.3 


517 


68.4 



t Percent of net roll of classes involved. 

* Junior high class consisting of pupils with following deficiencies: orthopedic, 32; sight, 7; 
cardiac, 15; and hearing, 1. 

§ Making satisfactory improvement applies to the opportunity group. 



Baltimore City Classes for Handicapped Children ; Persistence 49 
of White Pupils to High School Graduation 



CHART 7 



PERCENT 1943 WHITE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES ARE OF 1939 
ELELIENTARY SCHOOL GRADUATES 



County 

Total and 
Averege 

St. Mary's 

Worcester 

Talbot 

Ceroline 

Howard 

Carroll 

Kent 

Allegany* 

Harford 

Baltimore 

Dorchester 

Somerset 

Cecil 

Wicomico 

Anne Arundel 

Charles 

Prince George's 

Montgomery* 

Queen Anne's 

Frederick 

Washington* 

Garrett 

Calvert 



Wh.H.S. 
Grad' s. 
1943 

6,741 



144 
128 
158 
139 
351 

93 
714 
£71 
1046 
186 
138 
238 
216 
412 
104 
584 
518 

89 
431 
442 
215 

36 



56.5 

71.0 L92 
65.2 



Percent 
Boys 



Percent 
Girls 



65.0 
63.2 
62.9 
62.3 
61.2 
61.0 
60.9 
60.1 
59.4 
58.0 
57.5 
56.1 
55.5 
54.2 
54.2 
53.3 
50.6 
50.4 



GZA 



50.0 , 



m&mw/////////////////////^^^^^ 



m&&///////////y///M^^ 



w^mr////////////////////////^^^ 



59.8 1 

ms^///////////////^ 



w&&/////////////m^^ 



wssBmr//////////////^^^^ 



42:9 

wEsmr/////////////^^^^ 



i^&mr//////////////^^^^^ 




28.3 1 
W&^//////////////M^^^ 



* Pupils reported promoted from grade 8 of junior high or elementary schools in twelve 
grade systems were considered elementary school crradufl+es. For number of graduates for 
individual high schools see Table XXIII, pages 226 to 231. 



50 



1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 
CHART 8 



PERCENT 



1943 COLORED HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES ARE OF 1939 
ELELCEITARY SCHOOL GRADUATES 

No. of C.H.S. 
Grads. 1943 



County- 
Total and 
Average 



Cecil 

Carroll 

Allegany 

Baltimore* 

Dorchester 

Talbot 

Anne Arundel 

Somerset 

Wicomico 

Charles 

Caroline 

Harford 

Frederick 

Kent 

Worcester 
Prince George* s 
Queen Anne's 
Calvert 
St. Mary's 
Washington 
Howard 
Montgomeryt 



Boys Girls Total 



Percent 
Boys 




* Includes 6 boys and 17 girls who graduated from Baltimore City high schools, whoso 
tu>*ion was paid for by Baltimore County. 

t Montgomery County is changing from an eleven- to a twelve-year program which ex- 
plains why there is no graduating class in 1943. 

For number of graduates for individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 226 to 231. 



Persistence to High School Graduation; Entrants 
to State Teachers Colleges 



51 



TABLE 29— Estimated Number and Percent of Colored and White 
Elementary School Graduates Who Graduated from High School 
Four Years Later, by Year 













Percent 










Percent 










White High 








Colored High 






White 




School Graduates 


Colored 


School Graduates 


Year of 


High School 


Are of Elementary 


High School 


Are of Elementary 


High School 


Graduates 


School Graduates 


Graduates 


School Graduates 


Graduation 








Four Years Before 








Four Years Before 




Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


1927 


2,887 


1,071 


1,816 


39.4 


33.5 


43.9 


97 


34 


63 


9.8 


9.7 


9.9 


1928 


2,993 


1,142 


1,851 


39.5 


34.0 


44.0 


117 


42 


75 


10.3 


9.8 


10.6 


1929 


3,395 


1,339 


2,056 


41.2 


36.2 


45.2 


121 


50 


71 


10.2 


10.3 


10.1 


1930 


3,785 


1,534 


2,251 


43.8 


37.8 


49.0 


169 


63 


106 


13.0 


13.0 


12.9 


1931 


4,204 


1 , 713 


2,491 


45.0 


39.9 


49.3 


192 


77 


115 


13.2 


14.2 


12.7 


1932 


4,397 


1,772 


2,625 


47.0 


40.9 


52.2 


288 


124 


164 


18 9 


22.9 


16.7 


1933 


4,921 


2,114 


2,807 


49.6 


44.6 


54.1 


297 


117 


180 


16.4 


16.0 


16.7 


1934 


5,122 


2,220 


2,902 


50.5 


45.7 


55.0 


318 


128 


190 


18.5 


17.6 


19.1 


1935 


4,839 


2,052 


2,787 


48.8 


43.2 


54.1 


322 


142 


180 


16.2 


16.1 


16.4 


1936 


5,322 


2,283 


3,039 


49.2 


44.0 


53.8 


t374 


tl64 


t210 


T19.0 


fl9.7 


fl8.5 


1937 


5,472 


2,361 


3,111 


50.8 


46.1 


55.0 


t392 


U61 


t231 


t20.5 


f20.0 


1-20.9 


1938 


5,930 


2,566 


3.364 


54.7 


49.1 


59.9 


t510 


t202 


t308 


t25.5 


f23.5 


t27.1 


1939. . 


6,306 


2,750 


3 , 556 


57.8 


53.0 


62.2 


f576 


1234 


t342 


t27.9 


t26.8 


f28.7 


1940 


6,813 


3,017 


3,796 


62.7 


58.5 


66.6 


f673 


f245 


t428 


f31.0 


f26.4 


t34.4 


1941 


7,038 


3,168 


3,870 


64.0 


59.9 


67.8 


t708 


■ f249 


t459 


t36.8 


t31.4 


f40.6 


1942 


7,176 


3,165 


4,011 


62.5 


57.3 


67.3 


f659 


f256 


t403 


t36.8 


t32.9 


f39.8 


1943 


6,741 


2,886 


3,855 


56.5 


49.4 


63.4 


t689 


t269 


t420 


t34.3 


f29.6 


t38.2 



t Includes Baltimore County graduates who attended Baltimore City high schools at the ex- 
pense of Baltimore County. 



TABLE 30 

Number and Percent of County High School Graduates Who Entered State Teachers 
Colleges September after Graduation 



Year 



1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 



White 
High 
School 
Graduates 


White Entrants to 
State Teachers Colleges 
Fall Following Graduation 


Year 


Colored 
High 
School 

Graduates 


Colored Entrants to 
State Teachers Colleges 
Fall Following Graduation 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1,713 


2,491 


13 


214 


.8 


8.6 


1931 


77 


115 


14 


20 


18.2 


17.4 


1,772 


2,625 


23 


174 


1.3 


6.6 


1932 


124 


164 


16 


28 


12.9 


17.1 


2,114 


2,807 


11 


74 


.5 


2.6 


1933 


117 


180 


3 


17 


2.6 


9.4 


2,220 


2.902 


34 


88 


1.5 


3.0 


1934 


128 


190 


6 


26 


4.7 


13.7 


2,052 


2,787 


58 


93 


2.8 


3.3 


1935 


142 


180 


2 


15 


1.4 


8.3 


2,283 


3,039 


48 


131 


2.1 


4.3 


1936 


|164 


t210 


8 


16 


4.9 


7.6 


2,361 


3,111 


52 


118 


2.2 


3.8 


1937 


U61 


f231 


6 


30 


3.7 


13.0 


2,566 


3,364 


82 


151 


3.2 


4.5 


1938 


f202 


f308 


18 


38 


8.9 


12.3 


2,750 


3,556 


79 


179 


2.9 


4.9 


1939 


|234 


t342 


7 


21 


3.0 


6.1 


3,017 


3,796 


61 


141 


2.0 


3.7 


1940 


f245 


t428 


8 


f40 


3.3 


9.3 


3,168 


3,870 


36 


126 


1.1 


3.3 


1941 


f249 


t459 


5 


22 


2.1 


5.0 


3,165 


4,011 


37 


74 


1.2 


1.8 


1942 


f256 


f403 




f25 




6.2 


2,887 


3,854 


23 


88 


.8 


2.3 


1943 


f270 


t418 


*8 


20 


3^6 


4.8 



t Includes residents of Baltimore County who graduated from Baltimore City high schools after five years 
work above grade 7. 

[ For 1943 graduates and teachers college entrants for individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 226 to 

231. 



52 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 9 



WHITE GIRL GRADUATES OF COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS ENTERING 
MARYLAND TEACHERS COLLEGES THE FALL FOLLOWING GRADUATION 



Number Percent 

County 





1942 


1943 


1943 


County Average 


f 'k 


DO 

oo 


mm 


Wicomico 


9 


21 


|16.5 


Worcester 


6 


4 




Talbot 


2 


3 




Queen Anne's 




2 




Carroll 




8 




Somerset 


2 


3 




Dorchester 


3 


4 




Caroline 


3 


2 




Allegany 
Baltimore 


13 


10 




9 


13 




Washington 


7 


5 


ma 


St. Mary's 




1 


ma 


Montgomery 


1 


4 


D 


Harford 


2 


2 


ID 


Frederick 


3 


3 


is 


Anne Arundel 


4 


2 


D 


Prince George's 




1 




Cecil 


2 






Garrett 


6 






Howard 


2 







For graduates and entrants to teachers colleges for individual high schools, see 
Table XXIII, pages 226 to 231. 



1943 Graduates Who Entered State Teachers Colleges; 53 
Occupations of White High School Graduates by Year 
CHART 10 



COLORED GIRL GRADUATES OF COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS 
ENTERING BOWIE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE THE FALL FOLLOWING GRADUATION 


vUUUvjr 


Number 
1942 1943 


Percent 
1943 


County Average 


25 


20 


m-.mmmmM 








Talbot 


2 


3 




Caroline 




2 




WICOTUICO 


g 


5 




Cecil 




1 




Baltimore 


*2 


4 


i ii ii iiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiinuyif"' 


Harford 








Somerset 


3 


2 




Charles 

Prince George's 




2 




4 






Allegany 


1 






Calvert 


1 






Carroll 


1 






Montgomery 


2 






St. Mary's 


1 






Anne Arundel 


2 







* Includes residents of Baltimore County who graduated from Baltimore City high 
schools in 1942. In 1943 the number and percent include Baltimore County graduates from 
county and City high schools! who entered Bowie. 

For entrants to Bowie State Teachers College for individual high schools, see 
Table XXIII, pages 226 to 231. 



TABLE 31 — Comparison of Number and Percent of County White High 
School Graduates Continuing Education or Staying or Working 
at Home Year Following Graduation, 1926 to 1942 









Number 


Percent 




Total Number 


















Graduates 


of Graduates 






Staying or 






Staying or 


of 






Continuing 


Working at 


Continuing 


Working at 








Education 


Home, Married 


Education 


Home, Married 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1926 


1,045 


1,574 


507 


856 


88 


323 


48.8 


54.3 


8.5 


20.5 


1927 


1,071 


1,816 


472 


913 


99 


417 


44.1 


50.3 


9.3 


22.9 


1928 


1,142 


1,851 


480 


947 


118 


432 


41.8 


51.2 


10.3 


23.3 


1929 


1,339 


2,056 


527 


1,051 


125 


455 


39.3 


51.3 


9.3 


22.1 


1930 


1,534 


2,251 


542 


1,031 


223 


694 


35.3 


45.8 


21.5 


28.7 


1931 


1,713 


2,491 


574 


953 


361 


994 


33.5 


38.2 


21.2 


39.8 


1932 


1,772 


2,625 


471 


820 


495 


1,321 


26.6 


31.2 


27.9 


50.4 


1933 


2,114 


2,807 


469 


701 


447 


1,453 


22.2 


25.0 


21.1 


51.8 


1934 


2,223 


2,904 


522 


803 


473 


1,348 


23.5 


27.7 


21.2 


46.4 


1935 


2,052 


2,787 


498 


800 


367 


1,172 


24.3 


28.7 


17.9 


42.0 


1936 


2,283 


3,039 


613 


980 


244 


1,036 


26.9 


32.3 


10.7 


34.0 


1937 


2,361 


3,111 


652 


1,078 


354 


1,081 


27.6 


34.7 


15.0 


34.7 


1938 


2,566 


3,364 


745 


1,114 


347 


1,249 


29.0 


33.1 


13.5 


37.1 


1939 


2,750 


3,556 


761 


1,118 


254 


1,133 


27.7 


31.4 


9.2 


31.9 


1940 


3,017 


3,796 


*699 


*1,107 


147 


916 


23.1 


29.1 


4.9 


24.1 


1941 


J3.170 


13,871 


621 


1,006 


115 


773 


19.6 


26.0 


3.6 


20.0 


1942 


3,144 


3,964 


539 


f832 


24 


540 


17.1 


21.0 


.8 


13.6 



* Includes 10 boys and 2 girls, duplicates in Anne Arundel who are simultaneously working 
and continuing their education. 

J Includes 2 boys and 1 girl who received certificates, but did not graduate. 

t Includes 1 in Calvert and 1 in Prince George's who are simultaneously working and continu- 
ing their education. 



54 



1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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§Total 
Number. . . . 

County Aver. 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore. . . . 


_ 

z 

I 

c 


Charles 

Dorchester. . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Pr. George's. . 
Queen Anne's. 
St. Mary's . . . 

Somerset 

TalW 


Washington. . . 
Wicomico. . . . 
Worcester. . . . 



Occupations of White 1942 Graduates of County High Schools 55 



Distribution of White 1942 County Boy and Girl Graduates According to Specific 
Occupations Reported under Each General Classification in Table 32 



oys 


Girls 


Total 


22 


36 


58 


7 


3 


10 


1 


3 


4 




1 


1 


i 




1 


3 


i 


4 


1 




1 


2 




2 


2 


i 


3 




27 


32 


344 


17 


361 


15 




15 


6 




6 


136 


'2 


138 


91 


15 


106 


96 




96 


4 




4 


1 
3 




1 

3 


206 


1,799 


2,005 
38 
8 


4 


34 


8 


8 
96 


104 


2 


2 


4 


4 


1 


5 


1 




1 


32 


326 


358 


10 


4 


14 


26 


466 


492 


1 




1 




yo 


98 


2 




7 




1 
1 




3 


2 


5 


56 




618 








56 


194 


250 


81 


10 


91 


2 


2 


4 


10 




10 


4 




4 


6 


i 


7 


38 


4 


42 


1 




1 


2 


■ ■ 


2 




1 


1 


o 
c 







2 


i 


3 


1 




1 


13 


1 


14 


103 


39 


142 


19 




19 


11 


14 


25 


5 




5 


23 


'2 


25 


1 


3 


4 


7 




7 


2 




2 




3 


3 


*2 


3 


5 


6 




6 


2 




2 


25 


ii 


39 



Classfication of Workers 



Classification of Workers 



Boys 



I Professional and Semi-Pro- 

fessional 

d Draftsmen 

e Laboratory technicians 

f Librarians 

g Musicians 

h Photographers 

i Proofreaders 

k Recreation workers 

1 Reporters 

Unclassified 

II Agriculture — Farming 

a Managers or owners 

b Foremen 

c Laborers (paid) 

d Laborers (unpaid) 

Unclassified 

III Proprietors, Managers and 
Officials, Except Farm 

c (4) Wholesale trade 

Unclassified 

IV Clerical, Sales and Kindred 
Workers 

b Bookkeepers, payroll clerks. 

c Cashiers 

d File clerks 

e Mail carriers 

f Messengers, errand boys . . . 

g Meter readers 

h Office and calculating 

machine operators 

i Shipping, receiving and 

stock clerks 

j Stenographers, typists 

k Telegraph operators 

1 Telephone operators 

m Tellers (bank) 

n Ticket sellers 

Timekeepers 

p Other clerical workers 

r Hucksters and peddlers 

w Other salesmen and 

saleswomen 

V Craftsmen, Foremen, and 

Kindred Skilled Workers . . . 

a Bakers 

d Carpenters 

f Electricians 

g Machinists 

h Mechanics 

1 Painters 

k Plumbers, gas and steam 

fitters 

1 Photo finishers 

m Printing craftsmen 

n Radio servicemen 

p Shoemakers and repairers 

(not in factory) 

Unclassified 

VI Operatives and Kindred 

Workers 

a Apprentices, helpers, learners 

b Assembly small parts 

c Attendants, filling stations . . 

b Chauffeurs, truck drivers. . . 

g Laundry operatives 

(except private families) . 

h Linemen and servicemen, 
telegraph, telephone, 
power 

k Pipe fitters 

1 Power machine sewers 

m Riveters 

o Welders and flame cutters. . 

p Woodworkers 

Unclassified 



VII Domestic Service Workers 

in Private Families 

Cooks, laundresses, ser- 
vants, etc 

Married girls 



VIII Protective Service Workers 

c Armed forces 

d Ushers and doormen. . . . 
Firemen 



IX Service Workers Except 
Domestic and Protective. 

a Beauticians 

b Charwomen, porters 

e Housekeepers (except private 

family) 

f Morticians 

g Practical nurses 

i Waiters and waitresses. . 
Unclassified 



X Laborers, Except Farm and 

Mine 

a Fishermen and oystermen . . . 

c Lumbermen 

d Other laborers not specified . 

VI and X Operators and Kindred 
Workers and Laborers not 
Otherwise Specified by In- 
dustry 

6r-10e Manufacturing 

1 Food, drugs, and kindred 

products 

2 Cotton manufactures 

3 Rayon manufactures 

5 Apparel 

6 Woodworking, furniture. . . . 

7 Paper, paper products 

8 Electrical, including radio . . . 

9 Chemicals, petroleum pro- 

ducts 

11 Rubber products 

12 Footwear 

13 Stone, glass, cement products 

14 Iron, steel, metal industries 

15 Non-ferrous metals 

16 Machinery 

17 Aircraft 

19 Ships 

20 Transportation, except 

automobiles, airplanes 
and ships 

Defense 

Ordnance 

Unclassified 



6s-10f Non-manufacturing. . . 

1 Roads 

2 Railroads, railroad repair 
shops 

3 Transportation, except 

railroads 

4 Communication 

5 Utilities 

6 Wholesale and retail trade. 

7 Personal services 

Unclassified 



XI Unclassified 

Odd jobs 

Staying home. . . . 
Working at home. 

Illness 

Death 

Other 



XII Unknown. 



1,367 
1,363 
3 
1 



306 



50 
2 

138 



56 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

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High School Enrollment by Subject 



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60 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 37 



Enrollment in Each Year of Last Four Years of Maryland County High 
Schools for White Pupils by Year, 1925-1943 



Year 


I 


II 


III 


IV 


Post- 
Graduates 


Total 


1925 . 


6,772 


4,453 


3 ,281 


2,732 




17,238 


1926 


7,558 


4,777 


3|610 


2^748 




18 ',693 


1927 


7,871 


5,363 


3,856 


3,067 




20,157 


1928 


8,487 


5,636 


4,257 


3,178 




21,558 


1929 


8,587 


6,100 


4,694 


3,612 




22,993 


1930 


9,038 


6,292 


5,080 


3,981 


' 26 


24,417 


1931 


9,777 


6,969 


5,490 


4,338 


21 


26,595 


1932 


9,662 


7,636 


6,070 


4,646 


153 


28,167 


1933 


10,548 


7,658 


6,720 


5,207 


169 


30,302 


1934 


10,629 


8,016 


6,381 


5,404 


91 


30,521 


1935 


11,072 


8,162 


6,731 


5,110 


153 


31,228 


1936 


11,267 


8,749 


6,927 


5,526 


127 


32,596 


1937 


11,267 


8,907 


7,456 


5,675 


93 


33,398 


1938 


11,256 


8,883 


7,586 


6,080 


113 


33,918 


1939 


12,064 


9,332 


8,062 


6,478 


198 


36,134 


1940 


12,206 


10,073 


8,352 


7,041 


186 


37,858 


1941 


12,554 


10,342 


8,848 


7,323 


158 


39,225 


1942 


12,496 


10,440 


8,804 


7,515 


61 


39,316 


1943 


12,543 


10,087 


8,579 


7,161 


24 


38,394 



For enrollment of individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 226 to 231. 



TABLE 38 



White Pupils Enrolled* in Various English Courses in Maryland 
County High Schools for the Year 1942-43 



County 


I 


II 


English 
III 


IV 


V 


Journal- 
ism 


Public 
Speak- 
ing 


Total 1941-42 


12,616 


10,516 


8,946 


7,574 


67 


285 


t216 


1942-43 


12,552 


10,234 


8,766 


7,125 


33 


157 


J99 


Allegany 


1,249 

888 


1,070 


905 


786 




39 


38 


Anne Arundel 


742 


553 


445 


25 








2,126 


1,686 


1,396 


1,129 




101 


21 


Calvert 


85 


76 


48 


39 








Caroline 


246 


213 


195 


171 








Carroll 


529 


476 


396 


361 








Cecil 


397 


324 


293 


234 








Charles 


185 


156 


138 


111 








Dorchester 


285 


225 


246 


192 








Frederick 


751 


601 


562 


442 








Garrett 


364 


322 


276 


224 








Harford 


505 


408 


377 


264 






U7 


Howard 


244 


171 


181 


148 








Kent 


146 


122 


126 


96 










985 


840 


703 


570 






23 




1,407 


1,032 


846 


642 








Queen Anne's 


159 


122 


117 


89 








St. Mary's 


134 


114 


90 


94 








Somerset 


189 


167 


141 


139 








Talbot 


192 


143 


153 


125 










836 


693 


555 


468 










430 


298 


278 


214 










220 


233 


191 


142 









* Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitm?nt to an institution, 
t Includes 11 pupils taking business English, 
t Includes 17 pupils taking military English. 



White Enrollment by Years in English and Mathematics 61 



TABLE 39 

White Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Mathematics in the Maryland 
County High Schools, by Year 1933 to 1943, and by County, 1942-43 























is 






-t— 

u 
























.2 




1 w 

Q..2 


<v 


H— 


Year 

AND 


tics 1 


tics II 










netry 


>> 


tetry 


cs Re\ 


Revie 


and A 

hemat 


ti 

— ! <r< 


raining 


County 


sral 
thema 


rt 

n 




bra I 




bra II 


e Geor 


onome 


I Georr 


hemati 


imetic 


itional 
id Mat 


Lmercia 
siness i 


ness T 










Alge 




Alge 


Plan 


Trig 


Solic 


Mat 


Aritl 




BJ 

O on 
O 


Busi 


1932-33 


2 , 462 




9 


,071 


4 


,272 


4,412 


965 


417 


646 


467 


166 






1933-34 


2 , 509 




9 


,082 


3 


,915 


4,507 


1,067 


560 


455 


807 


204 






1934-35 


3 , 881 




8 


, 508 


3 


,865 


4,269 


713 


528 


260 


502 


193 






1935-36 


5,838 




7 


,384 


3 


,598 


4,183 


792 


533 


330 


418 


178 


* A A* 

447 




1936-37 


6, 174 




7 


292 


3 


,482 


3,938 


757 


500 


241 


339 


43 


284 




1937-38 


6,309 




7 


!l72 


3 


,225 


4,033 


694 


558 


281 


161 


32 


983 




1938-39 


°5,861 


°l|i82 


7 


,594 


3 


,255 


3,643 


676 


594 


136 


58 


208 


1,234 


80 


1939-40 


6 994 


1,360 


6 


,404 


3 


,400 


3,897 


764 


610 


133 


88 


436 


1,033 


355 


1940-41 


7^550 


1,512 


5 


,834 


3 


,057 


3,533 


727 


637 


184 


78 


475 


l!l73 


818 


1941-42 


7,663 


1,503 


5 


,638 


2 


,717 


3,366 


667 


536 


167 


81 


685 


1,065 


360 


1942-43 


7,780 


1,639 


5 


,794 


2 


,757 


3,092 


714 


520 


391 


211 


599 


919 


317 












By County, 


1942-43 












Allegany 


654 






685 




266 


276 


83 


17 


58 




131 


17 




Anne Arundel 


531 


9i 




415 




208 


161 


54 


44 


8 




93 


316 




Baltimore 


1,411 


259 




973 




583 


551 


133 


80 


49 




96 




4i 


Calvert 


58 


30 




27 




21 


23 


17 










24 




Caroline 


186 


114 




79 




85 


21 


37 














Carroll 


482 


83 




230 




78 


159 


21 


i3 


28 




is 


43 




Cecil 


254 


164 




144 




118 


120 


7 


7 








49 


38 


Charles 


136 






82 




36 


47 






25 






18 


22 


Dorchester 


235 


4i 




102 




41 


49 






16 






115 




Frederick 


511 






298 




118 


204 


62 


62 


17 








22 


Garrett 


292 


77 




123 




20 


76 






39 


40 




36 




Harford 


356 


277 




176 




133 


91 


29 


19 


36 


100 




42 




Howard 


245 






70 




32 


20 
















Kent 


86 


69 




84 




30 


90 












25 




Montgomery 


538 


45 




478 




361 


351 


80 


ii 


34 




66 


38 


67 


Prince George's. . . 


665 


86 




695 




188 


395 


104 


115 


47 






102 




Queen Anne's 


141 


68 




54 




64 


10 












19 


is 


St. Mary's 


16 






47 




27 


46 
















Somerset 


150 


46 




46 




41 


11 








24 




12 




Talbot 


111 






78 




53 


25 












29 


109 


Washington 


218 






624 




155 


233 


50 


43 


12 


47 


198 






Wicomico 


287 






217 




99 


110 


37 


36 


22 






34 




Worcester 


217 


189 




67 






23 




13 













* Exclusive of withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 

° In 1938-39 general mathematics was separated for the first time into I and II. 

t Enrollment shown includes all classes in business arithmetic and business training taught by 
teachers certificated for mathematics. The remaining classes in these subjects appear in Tables 40 
and 44. pages 62 and 65. 



62 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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I-H 1-1 CM i-H 



• c- t> to 00 eo h 

• t~ CM CM ^H .-H 

• «C CM ■<* CM O 

x l* t> t- in t» 

• i-t CM i-h 



xoommajcMoeot-T* 

Miaftf iSXhhXXiS 
C0T}<Tl<Tj<C0?DX«Dm«OTl< 



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t>^H-^<c7>^cNiTj<^Ha5cot> 

eO'^teocoeococO'^i'eo^i'eo 



ON(NXOeOO<£Xt- 

oi-ootcoeoasc-awco 
c-i-i©toi-Heoo"ia>a>co«o 

<o to t> to c- t- t- 1- x x x- 



•WOXHOiMCIt 
•t>t-^OCCWNX 



t>Tj<coCT!t>'*OT-Ht>t-«n 
cootMTi<cM'-i^ai'*-^ , «o 

OCMCDXCOCnWC-^hC-CO 

tj< ^ eo eo'''^''<J , ■># eo eo cm cm 



aixoortrf TfH-<f Li-* 
CM^CM^eot-C5t>«c m-H 

f3N^OICHOOiOO(6 

eo rj< eo~eo eo co i-h 



lnxt>eolnco- J T)^^oco•«i , 

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i-iastccocMintDtDco-^"^ 
•^eo-^m-fTfeoeo-tmin 



c7>mcMt>asint>tccMXX 

Ot-MTftOt-t-tCXttH 
OHOt-3)XiflCJ'f HiO 

TfTfr}<-^eoeo^}'int>xx 



eo^iotoooocnOiHNeo 
cocoeococococo^'^ 4 ^ , ■^ , 

<Meo4 , in^t>xaiO'HCM 
eccccoeocoeococo^f'^'^H 



•OtO 
■ tO i-H 
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t- CM -t-tCijHHNOt-tfKSCniaoxONCjSDOlCO 
CM — I i-H CM i-H r-H CO i-H CM i-H Hf rH CM i-H 



eoxast-asccMcr. comt-c-^:T)<incMOC7ST}<eoincMX 
oineomt-oc-inutcodxxioo-ocxcjc-inoo 
ojioh i-h rr cm 1-1 cm m cm eo ^h «h e- x rHi-iineocM 



co >— < t> o -mox^ -asoi • • o m • .»^Tj<Tf 

XTfint- ■ 1> L3 1- H -i-HCM • -i-HtO • -XCMO 

cm m i-ht* ri» 



X OS CM «-H 

m m to to 

i-h CM 



• O t> • 
•CM O • 
CO 



m t- -<f ■icxoroHHcct-c^CfNfXffl- 1 as to 

CO t> CM •Xai-<*Tj<^H.-Ht>a:t-CM;O^HtOX-<l l CMtC©CM 

co-fin »-ieocM cm to cm cm i-h i-h -<j< ,-h cm i-h 



hx^ji • «i o as cox eocM ox t> Tt^H i-h x t* eo o x eo 

0> tC t- • CO CO t- CT. ML-r-CiN^OHHiONtBiOt- 
t-«5H CMCOCO CM tO i-H CO i-H i-H X rH i-H i-H f-( ^H i-H C0 tH 



CP 

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C oi^ 1 



^_,-r , r> * « 03 s s ^ o 
b% S 2-g fc ? c § c $ s ££§ 8 u 

OUOQfeOKawSc3HC?wwH^^^ 



White Enrollment in Social Studies and Science 63 



sauitpBj^ 



Ajpupaig 



oipBH 



t ^Sojooz 



t aouapg P a Rddv 



% ii ^Soioig 



s 
3 



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■ O tJ" CO tJ< CO CT5 

CM CO t> t- lO 



oixoTfoooNHioeoH 
iMTj<(-ftooincDco"5«Doam 



I aouapg pa^py; 



oioot-H'joiOHiooai 
cococo^^^^^^'^co 

OS 

H tO 

t>iOlO 

eo coo 

MNt- 

■<* CD lO 



•i- 1 ^opig 



eoociocwrH^oaiCNiooc-J 

0CC--rl<aiC-JrHt~<O^Ot>in 

soifit-t-ocxaoiocxoc 



rH-H<O>->*0Ct><OeOrHeOeO 
OOiflOOtOOMOiMtDOO 

rHrHCOXLOOCOtXMCOlO 

MwocxKoooioioiaiO) 



co-tfio;r>t-oca50rHCNico 
eocoeocoeoeoeo-tTiwTj" 

c^co4"iAcit^-oca50rHsg 
cocococococococo' , 3 4 ' , ^' , 3< 



coo 'OWN • o-fcgaxNooeomso • t- ct> -loo 
■ t- oo -htjuo •omlOoO'-luOlMe^^'^ , • eo <-h -rnoo 

rH i-t rH(M 



axes -ocnoooo-HX— i ■oixifluiccwwH* 

HXM ■C-iOt-CcOHXOlX ■OOHHNrf iflNiO 
CO CO rH rH rH rH IM rH rH 



COmaMJl^Ot'iOKtOffit-OtDHtCOffiHifl^X 

COrHlO HH HTfNH COIN (M rH 



lOM«DCO[-a)!COHMMu':c£a)XX-HJltOt-(N^t» 

m^t-ot-aioooixot-Ht-^HcoHt-MMOioi 

0500 MnHHTflNNH <C X rH rH rH rH <N rH 



t-Hoa>iflMiofflH»ioo'<f'*t»oiOTfiafflOHai 
cJxeoeoi05ca5c-co«ic<i^irHcocD5005xaicO'^ , c>jrH 



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64 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 42 



White Pupils Enrolled"' in the Foreign Languages in the Maryland County 
High Schools for Years Ending June 30, 1925 to 1943 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


German 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1925 


2,076 


3,333 


1,411 


2,306 


38 


39 


8 


10 


1926 


2,154 


3,497 


1,400 


2,428 


31 


29 


6 


2 


1927 


2,335 


3,535 


1,379 


2,532 


24 


17 






1928 


2,494 


3,510 


1,420 


2,690 


19 


10 






1929 


2,271 


3,475 


1,656 


2,751 


34 


26 






1930 


2,338 


3,446 


1,567 


2,713 


46 


57 






1931 


2,534 


3,684 


1,598 


2,786 


22 


13 






1932 


2,559 


3,683 


1,762 


2,967 


53 


26 






1933 


2,421 


3,713 


1,989 


3,237 


46 


26 






1934 


2,460 


3,746 


1,850 


3,149 


30 


28 






1935 


2,272 


3,409 


1,601 


2,966 


36 


52 






1936 


2,106 


3,208 


1,604 


2,872 


36 


48 






1937 


2,141 


3,218 


1,589 


2,617 


36 


29 


10 


■ 3 


1938 


2,115 


3,155 


1,545 


2,664 


34 


20 


27 


10 


1939 


2,249 


3,276 


1,547 


2,663 


25 


29 


17 


5 


1940 


2,115 


3,328 


1,468 


2,594 


33 


48 


5 


5 


1941 


1,965 


3,325 


1,409 


2,457 


58 


59 






1942 


1,856 


3,032 


1,168 


2,197 


163 


194 






1943 


1,755 


2,845 


875 


1,852 


296 


460 







TABLE 43 

White Pupils Enrolled 1 in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics in Maryland County High Schools for Years Ending 
June 30, 1925 to 1943 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Arts 


Education 


Boys 


General 


Vocational 


1925 : 


4,338 




814 


6,266 


465 


1926 


4,256 




869 


6,595 


546 


1927 


4,905 


31 


922 


7,304 


618 


1928 


5,341 


39 


948 


7,797 


587 


1929 


5,528 


69 


929 


8,079 


516 


1930 


5,549 


201 


931 


7,690 


543 


1931 


6,107 


368 


1,100 


7,753 


566 


1932 


6,041 


418 


1,264 


7,461 


770 


1933 


6,380 


520 


1,260 


7,823 


720 


1934 


6,536 


410 


1,278 


7,908 


780 


1935 


6,873 


403 


1,389 


8,065 


1,040 


1936 


6,928 


772 


1,482 


7,259 


1,330 


1937 


7,489 


521 


1,644 


8,184 


1,324 


1938 


7,844 


578 


1,833 


8,105 


1,793 


1939 


8,318 


842 


2,049 


8,333 


2,613 


1940 


9,415 


892 


2,344 


8,903 


2,920 


1941 


10,196 


992 


2,355 


9,389 


3.287 


1942 


10,522 


1,100 


2,291 


9,850 


3,603 


1943 


10,731 


1.244 


2,192 


9,674 


3,518 



* Excluding duplicates and withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an 
institution 

For 1943 enrollment in individual high schools, see Table XXIV, pages 232 to 237 



White Enrollment in Foreign Languages, Practical Arts, 65 
and Commercial Subjects 



Distribu- 
tive Ed- 
ucation 


6 








Business 
Economicst 





• ■ • -oo cowoooooo 

. . - - 1- uO CO OS OS IM 5D 

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pq 


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cial Law 


6 


■»oo>HHioooHioo 

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. 1 

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• ooHCoasooeo<o«oeoH 
so io m h h <o as cm «£> 


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loeo-^^t-oooooococ^-^ 

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. 1 
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co<oeOHt-o?o-^irtooo 
Tf-tftoas-'tf-^r-t-oococc 


Office and 

Social 
Practice 


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Commercial 
or Economic 
Geographyt 


I 

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T*io^)<ooootoin)as^i<ccas 


1 

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5£><OC<lC<]iOOOOtOC~t-00 



111 



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Tf<m<NCO0OC0CO'<l l CM©CM 

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asHHOsOHintoaseot- 



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HMHBOOtOONOOCC 

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iCTtiotoc^c-asoasasic 



8> 



H 5 3 

£ < o 
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t-cccMHcot-ascoHaseo 

1-HrHTjl^CCOSOOOOt-OSrH 

CMCMCM<N<NCMCM<N<NCMCO 



omrtooo«)oomH» 
HaseocMiOHt-eoaseOH 
asccasascccct-t~miOTj< 



WfiOtCt-OOfllOHNKI 

co co co co co co co tj* ^ ^* 

MWrf iO(£it-xa)OH(N 

cocococococococo^^f^f 

OSasasasasasasasasasas 



• CM • • H CM O 



as c- r- • co c- cc as oo -^coh^cooccc-h^o 

rfKO . t— i ?D CO CO ^ • OS H CO «0 OS CM H CM «D t> 
(M i£> tH CM 



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OH[- -HTfCMCO^ -HHMHOlHlOHHinN 
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■^nooioHNTfcoiNint-'fMOO • c- tj< as c~ as 

tJ< CM «o "* CM t> as CO 00 CM CO O • CM CO CO as 

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ocMlOa3a^co^H^Dcotoco^co^DOCMcDcoco^D^J , 
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ascdtoeooo cm a> as Tt< m cm cm o co h tj< m cm co 
CM i-l hcm 



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66 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 45 



White Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art and Physical Education in Maryland 
County High Schools for Years Ending June 30, 1931 to 1943 



Year Ending 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 














June 30 
















Boys- 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1931 


7,119 


8,645 


315 


378 


3,594 


3,614 


1932 


7,031 


8,477 


671 


714 


3,976 


4,168 


1933 


7,714 


9,128 


741 


737 


4,722 


4,387 


1934 


7,465 


8,865 


529 


541 


4,601 


4,572 


1935 


7,461 


8,840 


537 


538 


4,813 


4,699 


1936 


7,526 


9,134 


418 


571 


5,413 


5,182 


1937 


7,579 


9,422 


535 


594 


5,483 


5,276 


1938 


7,333 


9,519 


910 


1,159 


5,793 


5,917 


1939 


7,840 


9,967 


1,534 


1,984 


6,935 


6,934 


1940 


7,978 


10,585 


1,836 


2,254 


8,216 


8,168 


1941 


8,635 


11,524 


2,105 


2,472 


9,226 


9,322 


1942 


8,652 


12,064 


2,536 


3,072 


10,534 


11,016 


1943 


8,011 


11,335 


1,919 


2,407 


12,063 


13,277 



* Excludes duplicates and withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an insti- 
tution. 

For 1943 enrollment in individual high schools see Table XXIV, pages 232 to 237. 



White Enrollment in Music, Art and Physical Education 



67 



ca 





961+ 


r4lOCQ«0CO^< 

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r-l iH i-l rH iH r-l 
























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co io • 






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CO • ■ CO 
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O • -CO CO 






CO ■ CO • ■ 
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1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

• -eo CO • • -HNH • . 



o 

©h. 

W ih 

.c © 

bo 00 

£ g 

© c 

>*\* 

JG 

W 
C3 

W 
# c 

CO 

o 

pq 



Senior Boys 


Failing Following 
Number of Subjects 




o> © eo eo 


eo 


©00 coco 


CO 


h® coco 
tj< eo 




CO r-l HH 

CO CO 

CO CO t~ t~" 


Total 
Number 
Failing 


co 10 © oc 
© t- 

CO CO Oi 00 


Junior Boys 


Failing Following 
Number of Subjects 


Tj< 


co oo oo eo 
eo -f 


eo 


coco o> o> 


CO 


m co oo h 

Tf lO • • 
H H CO ■<* 




485 
482 

12.5 
13.0 


Total 
Number 
Failing 


735 
754 

19 . 
20.3 


Sophomore Boys 


Failing Following 
Number of Subjects 


Tjl 


O © C— CO 

00 iO 


CO 


<x> © eo t> 

© X 

i-l CO H 


CO 


eo tj« m co 

H Oi 
CO H 




522 
503 

11.1 
10.9 


Total 
Number 
Failing 


921 

833 

19 6 
18 '.0 


Freshman Boys 


Failing Following 
Number of Subjects 


«# 


i-i eo t-co 

© Ol 

HH COCO 


eo 


© eo co oo 

© C- • • 

H t-H COCO 




H 05 t> 

Oi 00 • • 

coco 




587 
691 

9.8 
11.4 


Total 
Number 
Failing 


1,229 
1,343 

20.6 
22 .1 


County 


Total Number U942. 

1943. 

County Average fl942. 

1943. 



co i> eo • eo< 



ti< c- o> h co t- co o> © © eo © ih rH • eoccoiOHin 



iCO-tfiOCO -©CO • -lO-rJt -co • -co 



inTtfeo -to -oeoioeo -hh • t>< 



COCO© • H © • -C0t> -tCCO ■■<* 00 HH • • -LOCO 



minco ■ co cooc eo hco co h co -©i 



OS-*-* • os oc h eo x h \a eo -©co • -co -eoeox 



LO©Hooo5CO©HO)Hiot>.-<ait-t-ocTj<©cooct>© 
moo« eo m © co co io ri © co ^oh cocoeoTceo 

H CO H i-H 



BkSfl 



H O C K 

<3<(JfflUOUUUOfHOWWr<S0HC> , 72KlEH^^^ 



White Boys and 



Girls Who Failed from 1 to 4 Major Subjects 69 



Senior Girls 


Failing Following 
Number of Subjects 




CO CO H H 


co 


CO CO HH 


CO 


HH lO CO 
CO H 




to oo co 
coco 

HH CO CO 


Total 
Number 
Failing 


CO ooo 
to ira • • 

HH -^CO 


Junior Girls 


Failing Following 
Number of Subjects 




CO • • 


co 


CO H CO 
lO to 


CO 


t- CO CO CO 
OH 

HH CO CO 




oo t- eoto 

00 H • • 
CO-* 00 00 


Total 
Number 
Failing 


574 
635 

19 9 

13.0 


Sophomore Girls 


Failing Following 
Number of Subjects 




m cm *# to 

CO CO 


CO 


cooo 
co-* 


CO 


CO to C- H 
OH 

H HCO 




ID Tji CO O 

00 

CO CO (Ot- 


Total 
Number 
Failing 


495 
580 

9 
10]6 


Freshman Girls 


Failing Following 
Number of Subjects 


ri< 


ia m c- o 

rj< to 


co 


OilO COCO 
t-00 


CO 


a> to oh 
co co 

HH COCO 




OH Tj<T}< 
OH 

CO «5 


Total 
Number 
Failing 


653 
697 

10 4 
10 '.8 


County 


Total Number fl942. 

1943. 

County Average |1942. 

1943. 



t>H -cocoh -coco -ocohhcoco 



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rf HHC5 -tOCO -HtOCO -HHCO' 



owo> -cocoioh-^oohco • -cotoco 



o-<*eo -coHio -cotocoto ■ -t-coco 



CO to H lO CO CO •COiOHOC© -00- 



I CO CO CO t- CO 



§2 

oJ S S3 Si o 



^ Id's «| 2 & l*jf I Si IIS s 



1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



<3 



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White Failures and Withdrawals; Teachers by Subject 



71 



TABLE 50 

Number of County White Teachers Distributed by Subjects Taught in Last 
Four Years of High School, Year Ending June 30, 1943 



Subjects 



English 

Social Studies 

Science 

Mathematics 

Latin 

French 

Spanish 

Library 

Business and Distributive Ed 

Home Economics 

Industrial Work 

Physical Education 

Music 

Agriculture 

Art 

Administration and 

Supervision 

Guidance 

Total 



Number of 
Teachers on Full- 
time Basis Dis- 
tributed by Time 
Devoted to Dif- 
ferent Subjects 



1942 



254.4 
224.5 
187.2 
163.3 
36.9 
37.4 
2.7 
42.8 
137.7 
119.1 
102.2 
64.9 
58.0 
34.7 
28.3 

83.4 
18.7 

1,596.2 



1943 



243.3 
215.2 
187.8 
161.1 
35.3 
31.2 
5.7 
41.9 
140.3 
120.6 
98.8 
73.2 
57.7 
30.5 
21.9 

79.9 
17.8 

1,562.2 



Number 
of High 
Schools 
Offering 

Each 
Subject 

or 
Service 

1943 



144 
144 
144 
144 
76 
87 
13 
85 
77 
128 
94 
93 
117 
57 
41 

129 

52 



Number 
of Cases Where 
Teachers Instruct 

In More Than 
One High School 
Each Week or Term 



Teachers 



High 
Schools 



TABLE 51 

Number of County Colored High School Teachers Distributed by Subjects 
Taught, Year Ending June 30, 1943 



Academic 
Subjects 



Number of 
Teachers on Full- 
time Basis Dis- 
tributed by Time 
Devoted to Dif- 
ferent Subjects 



1942 



1943 



Number 
of High 
Schools 
Offering 

Each 
Subject 

1943 



Special 
Subjects 



Number of 
Teachers on Full- 
time Basis Dis- 
tributed by Time 
Devoted to Dif- 
ferent Subjects 



1942 



1943 



Number 
of High 
Schools 
Offering 

Each 
Subject 

1943 



Social Studies. . . 

English 

Science 

Mathematics 

Latin 

Spanish 

French 

Library 

Administration 

and Supervision 
Guidance 



29.2 
29.0 
26.5 
25.1 



2.0 



7.4 
1.1 



29.3 
28.8 
28.7 
23.0 



2.1 



Home Econ. . . . 
Agriculture. . . . 
Industrial Arts. 
Physical Ed. . . . 

Music 

Art 

Total Academic 
and Special 
Subjects 



24.0 
13.5 
11.4 
7.9 
6.6 
.1 



184.9 



23.9 
12.5 
10.6 
10.7 
7.7 
.3 



188.4 



32 



72 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 52 



Number of Clerks Employed in County Schools, 1942-43 





Number of Clerks 






County 






Total 


Average 








Salaries 


Annual 




1941-42 


1942-43 




Salary 


Total and Average 


28.8 


33.1 


$31,057.76 


$938.30 


Montgomery 


8.6 


8.5 


12,650.00 


1,488.24 




7.0 


7.0 


5,598.50 


799.79 




5.8 


7.0 


5,448.21 


778.32 


Prince George's 


1.4 


3.0 


2,338.80 


779.60 




2.0 


2.0 


2,292.25 


1,146.13 


Wicomico 


1.0 


1.6 


577.00 


360.63 


Carroll 


1.0 


1.0 


968.00 


968.00 




1.0 


1.0 


600.00 


600.00 


Dorchester 




1.0 


300.00 


300.00 


Garrett 


1.0 


1.0 


285.00 


285.00 



TABLE 53 



Number of Certificates Issuedf in 1920-21, 1941-42, and 1942-43 





Number of Certificates Issued 


Grade of Certificate 










1920-21 


1941-42 


1942-43* 


Administration and Supervision: 










1 


1 






3 




4 






i 


2 


Attendance Officer 




4 


1 


High School: 










8 


10 






141 


203 


212 


Special 


35 


98 


103 




39 


38 


49 






59 


51 


Elementary: 










19 


21 


15 


Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education. . . 




302 


442 








4 






7i 


144 


First Grade 


265 


: 


18 




289 






Third Grade 


161 






Non-public Advanced First Grade 




24 


17 


Non-public First Grade 




8 


7 


War Emergency Certificates: 








Degree 














87 


Elementary School Teaching 






31 


Non-degree: 








High School Teaching 






18 


Elementary School Teaching 






66 



* Up to June 30, 1943. 

t To white and colored teachers. 



Clerks in County Schools; Certificates Issued; 73 
Certification of White Elementary School Teachers 



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78 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

TABLE 59 



Number and Percent of Teachers New to the Maryland County Schools 

1932 to 1943 





New to Counties 




Number New to County Who Were 








Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 
October 

to 
October 




Experienced 


Year 


°Number 


°Percent 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


But 

New to 
State 


In 

Counties 
But Not 
Teaching 
Preced- 
ing Year 


From 
Another 
County 


From 
Other 
Type 
School 
in Same 
County 


Substi- 
tutes 



White Elementary School Teachers 



1932-33 


143 


5.1 


—81 


102 


2 


29 


10 


6 


10 


1933-34 


169 


6.1 


—27 


115 


12 


30 


3 


5 


12 


1934-45 


192 


7.0 


—16 


155 


10 


21 


7 


3 


6 


1935-36 


163 


6.0 


—6 


115 


7 


33 


10 


3 


8 


1936-37 


201 


7.3 


+ 17 


141 


19 


35 


10 


3 


6 


1937-38 


203 


7.4 


—18 


82 


40 


52 


40 


4 


29 


1938-39 


195 


7.2 


—20 


107 


22 


41 


18 


7 


25 


1939-40 


199 


7.4 


—17 


106 


18 


49 


18 


4 


26 


1940-41 


205 


7.6 


—5 


127 


29 


29 


19 


10 


20 


1941-42 


355 


13.4 


—38 


142 


63 


83 


31 


4 


67 


1942-43 


565 


21.2 


+ 8 


272 


169 


124 


54 


5 




White High School Teachers 


1932-33 , 


133 


9.9 


—15 


81 


23 


21 


16 


33 


8 


1933-34 


107 


7.9 


+ 11 


70 


14 


17 


9 


151 


6 


1934-35 


169 


12.1 


+ 36 


122 


28 


17 


16 


3 


2 


1935-36 


197 


13.6 


+ 57 


149 


17 


20 


16 


8 


11 


1936-37 


191 


12.8 


+ 48 


123 


36 


. 26 


13 


8 


6 


1937-38 


231 


14.5 


+ 92 


129 


66 


21 


25 


10 


15 


1938-39 


220 


13.2 


+ 82 


144 


37 


16 


25 


13 


23 


1939-40 


242 


13.9 


+72 


156 


38 


17 


19 


13 


31 


1940-41 


262 


14.7 


+45 


173 


44 


33 


20 


7 


12 


1941-42 


421 


22.6 


+ 73 


233 


111 


51 


25 


30 


26 


1942-43 


587 


31.9 


—19 


270 


237 


80 


61 


21 





Colored Elementary School Teachers 



1932-33 


103 


14.3 


+31 


78 


6 


16 


11 




3 


1933-34 


73 


10.4 


—14 


48 


8 


12 


19 




5 


1934-35 .... 


96 


13.5 


+ 8 


74 


1 


20 


13 




1 


1935-36 , . . 


70 


9.9 


—4 


57 


2 


9 


24 




2 


1936-37 


57 


8.2 


—9 


39 


5 


12 


22 




1 


1937-38 


47 


6.9 


—23 


35 


1 


7 


21 




4 


1938-39 


50 


7.6 


—18 


40 


4 


5 


25 






1939-40 


57 


8.9 


—17 


42 


3 


11 


22 




1 


1940-41 


41 


6.5 


—14 


30 


2 


7 


7 




2 


1941-42 ... 


59 


9.8 


—24 


37 


5 


9 


5 


"i 


8 


1942-43 


87 


14.6 


—9 


65 


9 


13 


9 







Colored High School Teachers 



1932-33 


28 


30.1 


+3 


21 


1 


6 


3 






1933-34 


15 


16.0 


+ 1 


11 


3 




7 




i 


1934-35 


20 


19.6 


+ 8 


17 


1 


i 


1 




1 


1935-36 


25 


23.2 


+ 6 


15 


4 


l 


8 




5 


1936-37 .... 


28 


23.9 


+ 9 


21 


6 




11 




1 


1937-38 


38 


28.4 


+ 17 


30 


8 




8 






1938-39 


35 


23.6 


+ 14 


27 


5 


2 


8 




i 


1939-40 


35 


20.8 


+20 


29 


3 


1 


10 


4 


2 


1940-41 


42 


23.3 


+ 12 


32 


7 


1 


6 




2 


1941-42 


38 


19.9 


+ 11 


27 


7 


4 


3 


'4 




1942-43 


65 


33.2 


+ 5 


49 


10 


6 


11 


2 





° Excludes from total number and percent new to counties, teachers who transferred from county 
to county, and from other type of school in the same county. 



Turnover by Year, and by County for White 
Elementary School Teachers 



79 



TABLE 60 



Number and Percent of White Elementary School Teachers New* to the 
Schools of Each Individual County During the School Year, 1942-43 



County 


New to County 


Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 
October 

to 
October 


Number New to County Who Were 


Number 


Percent 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


But 

New 

to 
State 


Experienc 
In 

Counties 

But 

Not 
Teaching 

ing Year 


ed 

From 
Another 
County 


From 
Other 
Type 
School 
in Same 
County 
or Cityf 




°565 


°21.2 


+ 8 


272 


169 


124 


54 


5 




2 


2'. 5 


—3 






2 








1 


2.6 


— 1 






1 








3 


6.5 


—1 


i 




1 


i 




Talbot 


3 


8.1 


—3 


l 




2 






Kent 


3 


8.8 


—1 


l 




2 








15 


9.4 


—7 


9 


i 


4 


i 




Cecil 


8 


9.9 


—2 


2 


2 


2 


2 






4 


10.5 




3 




1 








28 


12.6 


—9 


13 


6 
3 


8 


i 






9 


13.4 


—2 


6 






Calvert 


3 


13.6 




i 


1 


1 








6 


13.6 


—4 


3 


1 


2 








36 


14.8 


—9 


9 


5 


11 


ii 




Carroll 


20 


18.2 


—4 


10 


3 


3 


4 






13 


22.4 


+ 1 


10 


1 


2 








81 


23.0 


—11 


57 


2 


18 


'i 






32 


25.4 


+ 7 


15 


3 


9 


5 






78 


32.0 


+ 14 


23 


40 


8 


7 






62 


36.3 


+ 11 


36 


15 


10 


1 






39 


37.9 


—1 


10 


12 
66 


14 


3 






138 


43.4 


+29 


47 


11 


14 






13 


46.4 


+ 1 


5 


6 


2 




Charles 


22 


51.2 


+3 


16 


2 


4 
























Elementary and Oc- 


















cupational 


226 


16.7 


—43 


102 


a69 


40 


15 


4 


Entire State 


°791 


°19.7 


—35 


374 


a238 


164 


69 


9 



* Teachers in grade 7 and 8 of junior or junior-senior high schools are excluded from this table. 
They are included in Table 61, page 80. 

Excludes from total teachers who transferred from one county to another and from other type 
of school in same unit, but includes transfers from county to City. 

a Includes 4 from private school. 

t Excluded from total. 



80 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 61 



Number and Percent of White Regular, Senior High, Junior High, and 
Junior-Senior High School Teachers New to the Schools of Each 
Individual County During the School Year, 1942-43 



County 


New to County 


Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Posicions 
October 

to 
October 


Number New to County Who Were 


Number 


Percent 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


But 

New to 
State 


Exper 

In- 

Counties 
or City 
But Not 
Teaching 
Preced- 
ing Year 


ienced 

r rom 
Another 
County 


From 
Other 
Type 

. School 
in 
Same 

Countyt 


1 otal and Average 


°587 


°31.9 


— 19 


270 


237 


80 


61 


21 




12 


21.8 




6 


2 


2 


2 






47 


22.5 


—7 


20 


13 


6 


8 


*2 




15 


23.1 


+ 4 


11 


1 


1 


2 






7 


25.9 


—1 


2 


1 


3 


1 




Harford 


19 


26.0 


+3 


10 


4 


3 


2 


2 


Carroll 


25 


27.8 


—3 


11 


6 


2 


6 


2 




11 


29.7 


—5 


3 


4 


4 








68 


30.4 


+ 3 


22 


28 


16 


2 


5 


Frederick 


30 


30.6 


—3 


12 


12 


2 


4 




Talbot 


10 


31.3 


—3 


8 




1 


1 




Washington 


50 


32.7 


+ 3 


18 


17 


9 


6 






35 


34.7 


+3 


18 


13 


2 


2 


2 


Calvert 


4 


36.4 


+ 1 


3 




1 






Montgomery 


88 


40.0 


—22 


25 


53 


5 


5 


2 




19 


40.4 


+ 1 


1 


11 


4 


3 




Kent 


10 


41.7 


5 


2 


1 


2 




Somerset 


13 


41.9 




5 


6 


2 






Garrett 


21 


43.8 


—3 


13 


6 


1 


i 






22 


48.9 


—2 


11 


5 


4 


2 




Prince George's 


90 


54.2 


+ 9 


33 


43 


6 


8 




Howard 


22 


59.5 


+ 3 


12 


7 


2 


1 




Charles 


18 


60.0 


+ 1 


13 


1 


3 


1 




St. Mary's 


12 


63.2 


—1 


8 


2 




2 




Baltimore City 
















33 


Senior High 


26 


5^4 


—21 


16 


a6 


2 


2 


31 




89 


14.5 


—14.5 


49 


a22 


13 


5 


4 




13 


12.9 


—9 


7 


1 


5 






Entire State 


°715 


°23.6 


—63.5 


342 


266 


100 


68 


89 



° Excludes from total teachers who transferred from one county to another and from other type 
of school in same unit, but includes transfers from county to city. 
fExcluded from totals. 

a Includes transfers from private schools: 3 to senior high, 8 to junior high. 



Turnover of White High School Teachers; 1942 Graduates 81 
of Maryland Colleges Who Trained for Teaching; Men Teachers 



TABLE 62 

Maryland Students Who Completed in June, 1942, at Colleges Indicated, 
the Education Courses Necessary for Certification Compared with 
the Number of Graduates Who Took Positions in the County 
High Schools in the Fall of 1942* 



College 



Western Maryland College 
University of Maryland. . . 

Washington College 

Hood College 

Goucher College 

St. Joseph's College 

Johns Hopkins University. 
College of Notre Dame. . . 



Number of Graduates 



Who Met Requirements for 
Certification from 


Who Received 
Maryland County 
High School 
Positions* 


Maryland 
Counties 


Baltimore 
City 


38 


12 


28 


50 


21 


24 


13 




6 


4 


i 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


4 




1 


5 


i 


1 


6 


2 



According to reports from colleges. 



Number and Percent of Men Teachers in Maryland Counties 



Year 


White 


Colored 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 


No. 


Percent 


No. 


Percent 


No. 


Percent 


No. 


Percent 


1940-41 


232 


8.6 


719 


40.5 


74 


11.9 


83 


47.8 


1941-42 


190 


7.1 


670 


36.2 


66 


10.9 


89 


46.4 


1942-43 


139 


5.2 


538 


29.7 


58 


9.7 


81 


42.0 



See Table X, pages 211 and 212. 



82 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 63 



Number and Percent of Colored Elementary School Teachers New to the 
Elementary Schools of Each Individual County During the School Year, 

1942-43 



County 


New to County 


Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 


Number New to County Who Were 


Number 


Percent 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


But 

New to 
State 


Hxperiencec 

In 

Counties 
or City 

13 U I IN Ut 

Teaching 
Preced- 
ing Year 


I 

From 
Another 
Countv 


Total and Average 


°87 


°14.6 


—9 


65 


9 


13 


9 








—1 














4'.7 


—2 












*2 




2 






i 




1 


5.3 












1 


5.3 


_2 






i 






2 


6.5 


—2 


i 






1 




2 


8.7 








2 






2 


9.1 


—2 


2 










8 


9.9 


+ 2 


5 




i 


'2 




1 


11.1 


—1 


1 








Kent 


2 


12.5 




2 










2 


13.3 




1 


i 








2 


14.3 








'i 


i 




3 


15.0 




i 


2 








13 


15.3 




n 


1 


i 






8 


20.0 




5 


1 


1 


i 




5 


20.0 




4 




1 






7 


23.3 




7 








Carroll 


2 


25.0 




1 


i 








8 


28.6 




2 


2 


'4 






12 


36.4 


+i 


8 


1 




'3 


Calvert 


13 


52.0 




12 




i 




Baltimore City Elemen- 














blO 


tary and Occupational . 


56 


8.6 


+2 


35 


a9 


4 




°143 


°11.5 


—7 


100 


18 


17 


19 



Excludes transfers from another county from the county and State totals, but not from In- 
dividual counties, but includes transfers from county to City in the State total, 
a Includes 1 from private school. 

b Includes 2 from another type of Baltimore City school not included in the Baltimore City or 
State total. 



Turnover of Colored Teachers 



83 



TABLE 64 



Number and Percent of Colored High School Teachers New to the High 
Schools of Each Individual County During the School Year, 1942-43 





New to County 




Number New to County Who Were 








Change 
in 

Number 
of 

Teaching 
Positions 
October 

to 
October 




Experienced 




Number 


Percent 


In- 

experi- 
enced 


But 

New to 
State 


In 

Counties 
But Not 
Teaching 
Preced- 
ing Year 


From 
Another 
County 


From 
Other 
Type of 
School 
in Same 
County 
or Cityf 


Total and Average 


°65 


°33.2 


+ 5 




10 


6 


11 


t2 






















i 


11 ! i 
12.5 
20.0 

27.3 
27.3 
33.3 
33.3 
37.5 
40.0 
40.0 
40.0 
42.9 
44.4 
44.4 
50.0 
50.0 
60.0 
66.7 
70.0 
75.0 
80.0 




i 












1 




1 












1 










i 

2 






3 


+ 1 




i 






Dorchester 


3 


'3 






Allegany 


' 2 






i 






U 




6 




'5 


i 






6 
2 




5 


i 






Carroll 






i 


i 
1 




Washington 


2 


+i 






ti 


Worcester 


4 


'4 








3 




1 






'2 




Montgomery 


4 


+i 
—1 


2 


'2 






Talbot 


4 


2 


1 

2 


i 
1 
1 








9 
6 


+1 


4 


'2 
1 






4 




Cecil 


3 




1 

4 


'2 




Calvert 


4 












7 


+1 
+1 


5 












3 


3 












4 


4 










Baltimore City 
















Senior High 


'4 


5ii 


—6 


3 


i 
7 
3 






t2 
t4 
t5 


Junior High 


19 


11.2 
23.3 


+2 
+4 


7 


'3 


'2 
2 


Vocational 


7 


2 














Entire State 


°95 


°18.8 


+ 7 


61 


21 


9 


15 


U3 







Excludes from total teachers who transferred from one county to another and from another 
type of school in the same unit, but includes transfers from county to City, 
t Excluded from totals. 



84 



1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 65— County Teachers in Service October, 1942, Who Attended 
Summer School in the Summer of 1942 



County 


Teachers Employed Oct. 
1942 who Attended Sum- 
mer School in 1942 


Summer School Attended 


Number on 
County 
Staff 

R 


Number 


Percent 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 



White County Teachers 



Total White 


tttt367 


151 


13.8 


8.3 


Allegany 


60 


20 


24.7 


9.0 


Anne Arundel .... 


tt9 


10 


5.3 


10.1 


Baltimore 


15 


13 


4.2 


6.3 


Calvert 


1 




4.5 




Caroline 


3 


3 


7.9 


6.8 


Carroll 


11 


8 


10.3 


8.6 


Cecil 


6 


8 


7.4 


13.1 


Charles 


4 


1 


9.3 


3.3 


Dorchester 


15 


6 


22.4 


13.0 


Frederick 


27 


8 


17.1 


8.4 


Garrett 


20 


3 


19.4 


6.3 


Harford 


5 




4.0 




Howard 


11 


*7 


19.0 


18^9 


Kent 


8 


3 


23.5 


12.5 


Montgomery 


36 


28 


14.9 


12.8 


Prince George's. . 


t29 


3 


9.2 


1.8 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


3 


2 


7.9 


7.4 


St. Mary's 


1 


1 


3.8 


5.3 


Somerset 


24 


3 


54.5 


9.7 


Talbot 


4 


2 


9.8 


6.7 




U9 


6 


8.5 


3.9 




43 


8 


54.4 


15.1 


Worcester 


13 


8 


28.3 


22.9 



Total 

University of Maryland 

Salisbury State Teachers College. 
Frostburg State Teachers College 

Western Maryland College 

Columbia University 

Johns Hopkins University 

Towson State Teachers College. . 
George Washington University . . . 

Duke University 

Washington College 

Pennsylvania State University. . . 

Catholic University 

University of Delaware 

Shepherd State Teachers College. 

Baltimore County Workshop 

Cornell 

44 Others 



371 


151 


ttl21 


36 


86 


1 


49 


1 


14 


21 


tl9 


13 


tie 


5 


17 

8 


6 


1 


11 


8 


2 


1 


45 


1 


3 


3 


1 


3 


1 




3 




3 


20 


39 



Colored County Teachers 



Total Colored. .. . 


140 


56 


23.6 


28.3 


Allegany 


1 


2 


25.0 


33.3 


Anne Arundel .... 


7 


4 


8.9 


20.0 




10 


5 


25.0 


45.5 


Calvert 


2 


1 


8.0 


16.7 


Caroline 


4 




28.6 




Carroll 


1 




12.5 




Cecil 


3 


3 


33.3 


60.0 




6 


2 


18.2 


16.7 




7 


5 


25.0 


45.5 


Frederick 


5 


2 


26.3 


25.0 


Harford 


2 


1 


8.7 


14.3 


Howard 


4 


2 


26.7 


50.0 




13 


1 


81.3 


20.0 


Montgomery 


10 


5 


23.3 


55.6 


Prince George's. . 


19 




22.4 




Queen Anne's .... 


4 


2 


21.1 


4o!6 


St. Mary's 


6 




27.3 




Somerset 


10 


5 


33.3 


50 '.6 




5 


4 


25.0 


44.4 


Washington 


2 


2 


50.0 


40.0 




12 


5 


38.7 


31.3 




7 


5 


28.0 


50.0 



Total 

Morgan State College 

Hampton Institute 

Howard University 

Temple University 

Virginia State College 

Columbia University 

University of Pennsylvania. . . 

Catholic University 

University of Pittsburgh 

Pennsylvania State University 
8 Others 



140 


56 


88 


18 


16 


3 


10 


5 


8 


5 


6 


4 


3 


6 




5 


i 


2 


1 


2 




2 


*7 


4 



t Exclurles supervisor 



Summer School Attendance of Teachers; Pupils per Teacher 



85 



w 
ffl 

«Ph 
S Q 
P Z 

2; 



q a; 



O J3 



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to • • • • oo i-h to -rj< co co co rH t> co © cw oo t- co co © 

co co rH © o co co co cd to i-h oo © o t- co to »-t t- tji oo co 

NHHNH T-I^H^H^H COi-HCOrH rH 

CO O O O © CO CO "tf CD CO • tO lO tO t- CO lO © to CO Tjt 00 t-tOrJi • • tJ< 

CD O tO tO H © © 00 0C t- tO • O t- CD CD ^ t- i-H CD t- tO tJ< CO CO c- • • to 

co co co co co co co co co • co co co co co co co co co co co eococo • • co 

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n< CO O O © 00 -*j< COCO O • O 00 tJ< CO t- O COCO CO C-CO CO © • -t!<tJ< 00 

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co coco-tcocococococococococococococococococoeocj CO 

CO • • • • CD rH t- 00 CO© 00 © tO ©CO lO rHCO 00 tOCO t- -rJH 

CO CO • ■ • • Tj< rH 00 © 00 rH CO rH CO CO t- CO tO O O CO CO 

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sis 
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E = 



86 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 11 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF WHITE PUPILS BELONGING PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL 
IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (GRADES 1 - 7 OR 8) 





1941 


1942 


Co. Av. 


•35.8 


36.0 


Balto. * 


42.1 


44.3 


P. Geo. 


37 .7 


30.5 


Fred. 


37.7 


37.3 


A. A. 


37 . 6 


38.2 


Chas . 


35.1 


36.8 


Calv. 


34.5 


33.5 


How. 


35.4 


37 .5 


Cec . 


33.4 


34.5 




35. 6 


35.8 


Wash. 


35.2 


36.2 


Caro • 


35.5 


36.7 


Wlc. * 


36.5 


35.6 


Mont . 


32.9 


31.4 


Harf 


32.9 


33.1 


Som. 


35.9 


34.5 


Talb . 


32.7 


32.7 


Wor . 


33.9 


33.0 


All. * 


33.6 


33.2 


Garr. 


32.4 


32.8 


Dor. 


32.4 


32.7 


St. M. 


27.6 


27.8 


Q. A. 


33.0 


32.2 


Kent 


33.0 


30.5 


Balto." City t 


33.2 


33.7 


State 


34.9 


35.3 



38.1 , 



9 



376 



373 -/ 



371 



367 




35.2 




1 




36.3 


.1 



* Excludes elementary school at State teachers college. 

t Data for elementary schools only. Excludes corresponding figures for junior high 
schools: 24.9 in 1943, 25.0 in 1942 and 26.5 in 1941. 

For basic data by county, see Table XVIII, page 220. 



Pupils per White Elementary and High School Teacher 87 



CHART 12 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF WHITE PUPILS BELONGING PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL 
IN LAST FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL 



County 

County .Average 

Baltimore 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Washington 

Garrett 

Frederick 

Prince George's 

Wicomico 

Calvert 

Montgomery 

Harford 

Cecil 

Worcester 

Carroll 

St. Mary's 

Dorchester 

Talbot 

Howard 

Kent 

Caroline 

Somerset 

Charles 

Queen Anne^ 

Baltimore City t 
State m 




f Data for senior high schools only. Excludes corresponding figures for junior high 
schools: 24.9 in 1943, 25.0 in 1942 and 26.5 in 1941; and for vocational schools: 15.0 in 1943, 
16.2 in 1942 and 19.5 in 1941. 

For basic data by county, see Table XIX, page 221. 



88 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 13 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF COLORED PUPILS BELONGING PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL 
IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (GRADES 1-7 OR 8) 




Harford 
Allegany 
Carroll 
Queen Anne's 

Baltimore Cityt 37.0 36.3 

State 36.4 36.5 



* Excludes elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College. 

t Data for elementary schools only. Excludes corresponding figures for junior high 
schools: 27.4 in 1943, 28.5 in 1942 and 31.1 in 1941. 

For basic data by county, see Table XXI, page 224. 



Pupils per Colored Elementary and High School Teacher 
CHART 14 



89 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF COLORED PUPILS PER TEACHER ANT 
PRINCIPAL IN LAST FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL 



County 
Co. Av. 

Mont. 
Wor. 

Balto. * 

Dor. 

Som. 

Chas. 

A. A. 

Wo. 

Kent 

Fred. 

Harf . 

Q. A. 

Cec. 

How. 

Carr. 

Talb. 

Caro. 

Calv. 

P. Geo. 

St. M. 

Wash. 

All. 



Balto. Cityt 27.6 24.5 
State 27 . 3 25.2 




* In 1941 included classes for first two years, in 1942 for first three years, and in 1943 
for four years. 

f Data for senior high schools only, including 23 Baltimore County pupils whose tuition 
is paid by the county. Excludes corresponding figures for junior high schools : 27.4 in 1943, 
28.5 in 1942 and 31.1 in 1941; and vocational schools: 14.4 in 1943, 17.0 in 1942 and 15.1 
in 1941. 

For basic data by county, see Table XXII, page 225. 



90 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

TABLE 67 



Average Number of Pupils Belonging Per County Teacher and Principal 

1923-1943 



Year 


Average Number Belonging Per 
County White Teacher and 
Principal in 


Average Number Belonging Per 
County Colored Teacher and 
Principal in 


Elementary 
Schools* 


High 
Schools 


Elementary 
Schools* 


High 
Schools 


1923 


31 


7 


20 





38.3 


15.2 


1924 


31 


5 


19 


8 


35.9 


14.8 


1925 


32 


1 


20 


1 


35.7 


16.8 


1926 


32 





20 


3 


34.6 


19.0 


1927 


32 


3 


20 


4 


34.0 


19.9 


1928 


32 


8 


21 





33.7 


21.5 


1929 


32 


9 


21 


5 


33.3 


23.1 


1930 


33 


6 


21 


6 


33.0 


25.0 


1931 


34 





21 


9 


33.3 


25.2 


1932 


34 


9 


22 


3 


34.0 


25.0 


1933 


36 


2 


24 


4 


34.9 


26.7 


1934 


36 


1 


24 


8 


35.0 


26.3 


1935 


36 


1 


24 


7 


34.0 


26.5 


1936 


35 


8 


25 


1 


33.2 


29.8 


1937 


35 


4 


24 


9 


33.3 


30.7 


1938 


35 


2 


24 





33.7 


29.6 


1939 


35 


6 


24 


2 


34.9 


28.0 


1940 


35 


5 


24 


5 


35.3 


27.5 


1941 


35 


8 


24 


1 


35.8 


27.2 


1942 


36 





23 


3 


36.3 


25.5 


1943 


36 


8 


23 





36.3 


25.4 



* Excludes pupils in elementary schools of State teachers colleges. 



TABLE 68 — Average Annual Salary Per County Teacher and Principal 

1923-1943 



Year 


Average Salary Per County 
White Teacher and 
Principal in 


Average Salary Per County 
Colored Teacher and 
Principal in 




Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 




Schools 


Schools 


Schools 


Schools 


1923 


$990 


$1,436 


$513 


$906 


1924 


1,030 


1,477 


532 


835 


1925 


1,057 


1,485 


546 


808 


1926 


1,103 


1,517 


563 


891 


1927 


1,126 


1,534 


586 


908 


1928 


1,155 


1,544 


602 


897 


1929 


1,184 


1,557 


621 


879 


1930 


1,199 


1,550 


635 


874 


1931 


1,217 


1,559 


643 


882 


1932 


1,230 


1,571 


653 


856 


1933 


1,231 


1,532 


657 


837 


1934 


1,122 


1,394 


595 


784 


1935 


1,135 


1,398 


602 


790 


1936 


1,202 


1,469 


636 


817 


1937 


1,220 


1,488 


653 


821 


1938 


1,295 


1,587 


745 


905 


1939 


1,314 


1,595 


846 


997 


1940 


1,360 


1,605 


906 


1,018 


1941 


1,387 


1,618 


993 


1,103 


1942 


1,427 


1,639 


1,124 


1,290 


1943 


tl,539 


tl,735 


tl,291 


tl,450 



Salaries for 1943 include county bonus paid in 12 counties as shown on page 155. 



Pupils and Average Salary per Teacher by Year 



91 



CHART 15 

Average Salary Per County White and Colored Elementary and High 
School Teacher and Principal 1925-1943 



2.000 

1800 

1.600 

1.400 

1.E00 

1.000 

800 

600 
500 
























































































ili&H 3 












t 




















r 

/\ 


















/ 

/ 


i 
i 

— / — 












\ 




/ 

/ 




/ . 

I i 
1 • 

/ : 












\ 


/ 






/ : 
/ 

U— 


















i 

/ 

/ 


















/ 

/ 

A 


• 






f c 

t 








\ 




/ 

/ 

9 


.•* 














\ 


^ 



























































































X3Z5 1527 1929 1931 1933 1935 1937 1939 1941 1942 1945 

Salaries for 1943 include county bonus paid in 12 counties as shown on page 155. 



92 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 16 



AVERAGE SALARY PER WHITE ELEMEHTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPAL AMD TEACHER 



County 1933 1941 1942 1943 

Co. At. #1231 $1357 $1429 



Slont. 


1366 


Balto. 


1453 


P. Geo. 


1231 


Wash. 


1168 


All. 


1314 


A. A. 


1270 


V.'i c . 


1143 


Carr. 


1095 


Fred. 


1139 


Cec. 


1226 


How. 


1104 


Talb. 


1121 


ft. A. 


1183 


Ctas. 


1100 


Dor. 


1104 


V.'or. 


1118 


Son. 


1119 


Kent 


1175 


Harf . 


1151 


Calv. 


1150 


Caro. 


1115 


Garr. 


1144 


St. K. 


1099 


Balto. 


1701 


City 


State 


1405 




f Data for elementary schools only in Baltimore City. Excludes corresponding figures 
for junior high schools: $2,137 in 1943, $2,122 in 1942, $2,117 in 1941 and $1,897 in 1933. 
For basic data by county, see Table XVIII, page 220. 

Salaries for 1943 include county bonus paid in 12 counties as shown on page 155. 



Average Salary per White Elementary and High School Teacher 93 



CHART 17 



AVERAGE SALARY PER WHITE HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL AND TEACHER 



1943 Per Per Priacipal 
County Prin- Teach- and Teacher 
cipal er 1942 1943 

Co.Av. 12768 $1630 $1639| 




Data for senior high schools only in Baltimore City. Excludes following corresponding 
figures for junior high and vocational schools : 

* 1943 per principal: junior high $3,378; vocational $3,481. 

° 1943 per teacher: junior high $2,09S ; vocational $2,086. 

t 1943 per principal and teacher: junior high $2,137; vocational $2,179. 

t 1942 per principal and teacher: junior high $2,122; vocational $2,102. 

For basic data by county, see Table XIX, page 221. 

Salaries for 1943 include county bonus paid in 12 counties as shown on page 155. 



94 



1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 
CHART 18 



AVERAGE SALARY PER COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER 



County- 


1933 


1941 


1942 


Co. Av. 


$ 657 $ 993 $1124 




641 


1500 


1550 


Balto . 


1139 


1425 


1379 


All . 


1223 


1394 


1364 




907 


1234 


1340 


A. A. 


703 


1174 


1237 


P. Geo. 


744 


1071 


1091 


Cec. 


726 


1120 


1173 


Harf . 


703 


955 


1104 


Wic. 


586 


705 


966. 


Carr. 


587 


933 


1035 


Fred. 


590 


1046 


1143 


Chas. 


578 


810 


1024 


Sam. 


539 


667 


973 


Caro. 


534 


985 


1041 


How. 


568 


805 


971 


Calv. 


593 


807 


986 


Q. A. 


561 


892 


1043 


Dor. 


541 


678 


969 


St. M. 


570 


802 


989 


Talb. 


562 


849 


974 


Kent 


582 


883 


1044 


Wor. 


559 


681 


959 


Balto. Cityt 


1614 


1836 


1855 


State 


1056 


1418 


1501 




t Data for elementary schools only in Baltimore City. Excludes corresponding figures 
for junior high schools: $1,939 in 1943, $1,922 in 1942, $1,984 in 1941, and $1,996 in 1933. 
For basic data by county, see Table XXI, page 224. 

Salaries for 1943 include county bonus paid in 12 counties as shown on page 155. 



Average Salary per Colored Elementary and High School Teacher 95 



CHART 19 



County 



AVERAGE SALARY PER COLORED HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL AND TEACHER 

1943 Per Per Principal 
Prin- Teach- and Teacher 
1943 





oipal 


er 


1942 


Co. Av. 


$2013 


$1335 


$1290 


All. 


2400 


1547 


1823 


Mont • 


2825 


1616 


1564 


Wash. 


2150 


1407 


17 27 


Balto. 


2350 


1333 


1437 


A. A. 


2600 


1523 


1441 


Carr. 


2115 


1348 


1285 


How. 


2150 


1264 


1207 


Fred. 


2250 


1326 


1266 


Harf. 


1710 


1326 


1261 


P. Geo. 


1783 


1364 


1275 


Wio? 


2550 


1356 


1144 


Kent 


2050 


1236 


1348 


Cec. 


1750 


1301 


1369 


Chas. 


1850 


1289 


1217 


St. M. 


1650 


1287 


1194 


Caro. 


2150 


1234 


1179 


Talb. 


2250 


1222 


1339 


Calv. 


1850 


J236 


1223 


Dor. 


2350 


1237 


1173 


Q. A. 


1850 


1205 


1239 


Sam. 


1900 


1154 


1119 


Wor. 


1500 


1208 


1140 


Balto. City 


*4014 


•2785 


t2576 


State 


2131 


1827 


1700 




Data for senior high schools only in Baltimore City. Excludes corresponding figures 
for junior high and vocational schools : 

♦ 1943 per principal: junior high $3,231; vocational $3,990. 

° 1943 per teacher: junior high $1,897; vocational $2,208. 

$ 1943 per principal and teacher: junior high $1,939; vocational $2,267. 

f 1942 per principal and teacher: junior high $1,922; vocational $2,190. 

For basic data by county, see Table XXII, page 225. 

Salaries for 1943 include county bonus paid in 12 counties as shown on page 155. 



96 



1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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Average Salary per Teacher; Size of Teaching Staff 97 
in County Elementary Schools 



TABLE 70 

Number of County Schools Giving Instruction in Grades 1-7 (8) Having 
Following Number of Teachers and Principals, School Year, 1942-43 



Number 
of 

Teachers 

and 
Principals 


Total 


Allegany 


Anne Arundel || 


Baltimore 


Calvert 


Caroline 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Charles 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


Montgomery 


| Prince George's || 


Queen Anne's 


St. Mary's 


[ Somerset 


Talbot 


Washington 


Wicomico 


| Worcester 


Schools for White Pupils 


Total Schools 


578 


42 


26 


45 


6 


9 


21 


23 


9 


29 


30 


56 
38 


39 


12 


12 


42 


48 


15 


14 


13 
6 


12 


46 


17 

3 


12 


1.0- 1.4 


149 


7 




ttt5 
2 


11 


2 


17 


1 

8 


16 


4 


tt3 

5 


7 


7 


5 


4 


t4 

*3 


8 


1 


1.5- 2.4 


104 


3 


4 


6 


3 


3 


4 


1 


5 


8 


10 


1 


4 


*5 


4 


8 


1 


10 


3 


3 


2.5- 3.4 


41 


2 


3 


4 








1 




1 


2 


3 


2 


2 


*5 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


4 


2 


3 


3.5- 4.4 


47 

38 


2 


1 


4 


*2 


i 


'2 






2 


7 


3 




i 




2 


5 


2 


1 


2 


7 


2 


1 


4.5- 5.4 


2 


5 


4 




1 


2 


i 


5 




1 


1 


3 


1 




*2 


2 






1 




3 


3 


1 


5.5- 6.4 


36 


4 


3 


5 




2 


3 






2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


7 






i 






1 


6.5- 7.4 


33 


**6 


2 


2 


i 


1 


1 


'3 






5 


1 




1 


*2 


4 




1 


1 




1 




1 


7.5- 8.4 


24 


1 


1 


4 




1 






i 


1 


*3 


1 




3 


4 


i 


2 








1 


8.5- 9.4 


19 


2 


3 






4 






1 


2 








i 




3 










1 


9.5-10.4 


16 


2 


i 


1 








1 








1 








*4 


1 

3 










2 


3 




10.5-11.4 


10 
6 


1 


l 


1 














1 










3 
















11.5-12.4 


2 




3 




































1 






12.5-13.4 


11 


2 


3 


2 
























1 


1 








1 


1 






13.5-14.4 


7 


1 














1 














3 


1 










*1 






14.5-15.4 


9 






1 








i 






1 




2 






2 


1 










1 






15.5-16.4 


5 




i 


1 














1 






















*2 






16.5-17.4 


6 


























1 




2 


1 










2 






17.5-18.4 


3 


2 






























1 
















18.5-19.4 


4 


*1 


l 








1 


















1 


















19.5-20.4 


2 


1 






































1 






20 . 5 or more 


8 


*1 




4 
























*1 


1 





























































Schools for Colored Pupils 



2 


38 


17 


17 


4 


6 


6 


19 


13 


9 




16 


8 


10 


19 


41 


15 


14 


12 


10 


1 


11 


10 


1 


14 


6 


12 




4 


3 


10 


7 


4 




12 


2 


7 


3 


13 


13 


7 


4 


m 




4 


: 2 




17 


7 


3 




1 


3 


7 


3 


4 




3 


5 




10 


23 


1 


5 


5 




3 


5 




1 




1 


3 


1 






1 








1 


1 


4 


2 


1 


2 




'2 




3 






4 
1 


1 

2 


1 


i 








1 








1 


2 


1 




1 








1 

2 






2 






1 


























2 


i 


1 






1 






































1 




























1 




































































1 
























































1 















































Total Schools 

1.0- 1.4. . . 
1.5- 2.4. . . 
2.5- 3.4. . . 
3.5- 4.4. . . 
4.5- 5.4. . . 
5.5- 6.4. . . 
6.5- 7.4. . . 
7.5- 8.4. . . 
8.5- 9.4. . . 
9.5-10.4. . . 

11.5-12.4. . . 



135 
106 
23 
13 
10 
4 
3 
1 
1 
1 



* Includes teaching staff in grades 7 (and 8) in separate junior or junior-senior high schools. 

t Includes a school having grades 1-4 with one teacher. 

Includes a school having grades 6 and 7 with one teacher. 



98 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 71 

Decrease in Teachers Employed in County One-Teacher Schools," 1920-1943 





County White Elementary Teachers 


Colored Elementary Teachers 


School Year 














Ending 




In One-Teacher Schools 




In One-Teacher Schools 


June 30 


Total 






Total 










Number 


Percent 




Number 


Percent 


1920 


2.992 


1,171 


39.1 


683 


422 


61.8 


1921 


3,037 


1,149 


37.8 


694 


408 


58.8 


1922 


3,054 


1,124 


36.8 


708 


406 


57.3 


1923 


3,063 


1,093 


35.7 


712 


403 


56.6 


1924 


3,065 


1,055 


34.4 


728 


395 


54.4 


1925 


3,047 


1,005 


33.0 


721 


397 


55.1 


1926 


3,067 


956 


31.2 


728 


394 


54.1 


1927 


3,088 


898 


29.1 


725 


382 


52.7 


1928 


3,070 


823 


26.8 


734 


378 


51.5 


1929 


3,078 


739 


24.0 


734 


372 


50.7 


1930 


i 3,050 


663 


21.7 


733 


363 


49.5 


1931 


3,049 


586 


19.2 


739 


353 


47.7 


1932 


3,022 


489 


16.2 


727 


344 


47.3 


1933 


2,954 


407 


13.8 


718 


334 


46.5 


1934 


2,947 


377 


12.8 


708 


331 


46.7 


1935 


2,941 


365 


12.4 


714 


318 


44.5 


1936 


2,949 


342 


11.6 


709 


309 


43.6 


1937 


2,972 


324 


10.9 


697 


293 


42.0 


1938 


2 . 965 


289 


9.7 


677 


271 


40.0 


1939 


2,946 


260 


8.8 


658 


232 


35.3 


1940 


2,944 


209 


7.1 


644 


198 


30.7 


1941 


2.921 


184 


6.3 


627 


181 


28.9 


1942 


2,935 


160 


5.5 


611 


146 


24.0 


1943 


2,929 


143 


4.9 


601 


132 


22.0 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization, i. e., grades one to six, seven or eight. 



TABLE 72 — Number and Percent of Teachers and Pupils in *One-Teacher 
Elementary Schools in Maryland Counties, Year Ending June 30, 1943 





Schools For White Pupil 


a • 




Schools For Colored Pupils 




Teachers in 


Pupils in 




Teachers 


n 


Pupils in 


County 


One-Teacher 


One-Teacher 


County 


One-Teacher 


One-Teacher 


Schools 


Schools 




Schools 




Schools 




Num- 


Per- 


Num- 


Per- 




Num- 


Per- 


Num- 


Per- 




ber 


cent 


ber 


cent 




ber 


cent 


ber 


cent 


Total and Average 


143.1 


4.9 


3,346 


2 





Total and Average 


132.3 


22 





4,200 


19.2 














Caroline 
























Washington 
























Worcester 


1.6 


3 


9 


45 


4^i 


Caroline !...-. 












Montgomery 


3.0 


7 





125 


8.0 




i!6 


.6 


is 




3 




4.0 


12 


9 


117 


11.0 




2.0 


1.7 


29 




7 




2.0 


13 


3 


67 


11.9 


Prince George's. . . . 


7.0 


2.2 


162 




3 




4.0 


13 


3 


104 


9.4 


Worcester 


1.0 


2.2 


14 




9 


Baltimore 


6.0 


14 


5 


247 


13.3 




7.1 


2.2 


187 


1 


7 


Allegany 


1.0 


15 


2 


26 


14.8 


Montgomery 


7.0 


2.2 


153 


1 


4 


Prince George's. . . 


13.0 


15 


5 


399 


13.9 


Kent 


1.0 


2.9 


24 


2 


3 


Anne Arundel 


14.0 


17 


3 


446 


15.7 


Washington 


8.0 


2.9 
3.9 


220 


2 


2 


Frederick 


4.0 


21 


1 


113 


16.8 


Wicomico 


3.0 


81 


3 





Dorchester 


7.0 


25 





217 


20.8 


Charles 


2.0 


4.7 


37 


2 


3 


Talbot 


5,0 


25 


1 


154 


20.7 




4.0 


6.7 


92 


4 


2 


Charles 


10.0 


29 


4 


380 


28.9 


Talbot 


3.0 


7.5 


47 


3 


5 


St. Mary's 


7.0 


30 


7 


193 


27.9 


Harford 


16.0 


12.5 


397 


9 


1 


Cecil 


3.0 


33 


3 


99 


28.6 




11.0 


13.2 


343 


11 


3 


Kent 


7.0 


43 


8 


241 


41.3 


Queen Anne's 


5.0 


13.2 


118 


9 


9 


Carroll 


4.0 


44 


9 


89 


34.1 


St. Mary's 


4.0 


13.3 


109 


11 

9 


5 




12.0 


48 





502 


48.0 


Somerset 


6.0 


13.9 


U2 


7 


Harford 


12.0 


52 


2 


313 


44.7 


Dorchester 


17.0 


25.2 


353 


16 


7 


Queen Anne's 


13.3 


72 


7 


323 


64.3 




38.0 


37.1 


820 


25 


5 















* Schools having a one-teacher organization, i. e., grades one to five, six, seven, or eight 



County One-Teacher Schools; Public High Schools 99 
TABLE 73 

Number of Public High Schools, Year Ending July 31, 1943 



Public High Schools for 



Year and 
County 


White Pupils 


Colored Pupils 


Total 


Group 


Total 


Group 


°1 


°2 or Jr. 


°1 




°2 




82 


*69 


tl3 


4 






t4 




148 


*130 


tl8 


16 


ii 




5 




152 


142 


alO 


25 


17 




8 




150 


136 


bl4 




25 




3 




149 


133 


cl6 


33 


31 




a2 




149 


132 


dl7 


33 


31 




a2 


1942 


148 


131 


dl7 


33 


31 




a2 


1943 


144 


128 


dl6 


32 


30 




a2 




10 


8 


2 • 


1 


1 






Anne Arundel 


6 


4 


a2 


1 


1 






B&ltimore 


11 


6 


t5 


3 


3 








1 


1 






1 








5 


5 




1 


1 






Carroll 


9 


8 


i 


1 


1 






Cecil 


8 


8 






1 








5 


5 




2 


2 








6 


6 




1 


1 






Frederick 


7 


7 




1 


1 








5 


5 














8 


8 




2 


2 








4 


4 




1 


1 






Kent 


4 


4 




1 


1 






Montgomery 


11 


7 


e4 


1 


1 






Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


11 


11 




3 


3 






5 


5 




1 


1 






St. Mary's 


2 


2 




2 


2 








4 


4 




2 


2 






Talbot 


4 


4 




1 


1 






Washington 


8 


6 


x2 


1 


1 






Wicomico 


6 


6 




1 


1 








4 


4 




3 


1 




a2 


Baltimore City 


20 


§7 


xl3 


4 


§2 




x2 


Entire State 


164 


135 


29 


36 


32 




4 



° First group schools have as a minimum an enrollment of 30, an attendance of 25, and two 
teachers. They give a four-year course. Second group schools have as a minimum an enrollment 
of 15, an attendance of 12. They give a two-year course. Junior high schools composed of the higher 
elementary grades (7 in the 7 grade counties and 7-8 in the 8 grade counties) and the first, or first and 
second years of high school (8 or 8-9 in the 11 grade counties and 9 in the 12 grade counties). 

* Includes the group classified as group 1 and group 2, prior to 1928. 

t Classified as group 3 prior to 1928. 

a Second group schools only. 

b Includes 7 junior high schools. 

c Includes 10 junior high schools. 

d Includes 11 junior high schools. 

e Excludes one junior high school with grades 7 and 8 only. 

t Includes 3 second group schools which give a one-year course only, and 2 with a two-year 
course. 

§ Includes two junior-senior high schools with grades 7-12 inclusive, 
x Junior high schools having grades 7 to 9 inclusive. 
For individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 226 to 231. 



108390 



100 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 74 



Size of Teaching Staff in Last Four Years of Maryland County White 
High Schools, Year Ending June 30, 1943 





































JB 

*a> 
bC 


JJ5 














Number 






- 














t— 












b 


i_ 

c 


a 








C 






of 

Teachers 


Total No. 
Schools 


Allegany 


Anne Arm 


| Baltimore 


| Calvert 


Caroline 


| Carroll 


| Cecil 


| Charles 


Dorcheste 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


Montgomi 


Prince Ge 


Queen An 


St. Mary'i 


Somerset 


Talbot 


Washingt( 


Wicomico 


Worcester 


Total 


144 


10 


6 


11 


1 


5 


9 


8 


5 


6 


7 


5 


8 


4 


4 


11 


11 


5 


2 


4 


4 


8 


6 


4 



First Group High Schools 



2 


6 
5 

15 

15 
7 

12 
3 

16 
9 
3 
5 
5 

3 
2 

2 
1 

1 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

2 

2 














1 














1 










2 


1 
1 




1 




3 
















3 
1 












1 






4 


1 

2 








1 
1 


1 
2 
1 
2 
1 


2 
1 


3 


1 


2 
1 


1 

2 
2 


2 


1 
1 


1 
1 


3 








1 

3 


1 












1 






6 


i 
i 








1 




7 








1 
1 

i 






2 


1 






3 






8 










1 
1 






9 






i 




2 


2 


1 


1 
1 


1 








2 
2 
1 


1 






1 


1 




2 
1 


10 


1 


1 




11 








1 
















12 


1 
1 






1 
















1 










1 




1 




13 




















1 


1 




1 
1 




1 


14 
































15 




















1 


























16 






i 






















1 










1 








17 








l 






























20 






















1 
























23 






















1 
























24 












1 






1 












1 
1 
















25 


1 




































30 




2 








































31 
























1 
1 


















33 














































34 






























1 












1 




36 


i 
i 




1 




































37 








































38 


i 












































39 












































40 


i 












































47 


1 














1 































































Second Group and Junior High Schools 



1 


3 
2 
3 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

2 

1 


1 

i 


i 


2 

i 










































2 
























l 


















3 






i 


































4 


i 








































5 
























i 


















7 




l 










































8 


























l 


















9 








































i 
l 






10 






i 




































13 



















































































For teaching staff in individual high schools, see Table XXIII, pages 226 to 231. 



County White High Schools by Size of Teaching Staff 101 
and Enrollment 



TABLE 75 



Size of Enrollment in Last Four Years of Maryland County White High 
Schools, for Year Ending June 30, 1943 



Average Number 
Belonging 


Total No. 
Schools 


Allegany 


Anne Arundel 


Baltimore 


Calvert 


Caroline ' 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Charles 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


Montgomery 


Prince George's 


Queen Anne's 


1 St. Mary's 


Somerset 


[ Talbot 


1 Washington 


1 Wicomico 


| Worcester 


Total 


144 


10 


6 


11 


1 


5 


9 


8 


5 


6 


7 


5 


8 


4 


4 


11 


11 


5 


2 


4 


4 


8 


6 


4 




First Group High Schools 


26- 40 


5 
2 
14 
13 
13 
12 
9 
10 
9 
5 
4 
2 
4 
3 

1 

1 

3 

1 

3 
2 
1 

2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

4 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 






2 








1 


























1 




1 




41— 50 










\ 

3 






















51- 75 










1 




3 
1 

i 


2 
I 

i 
i 


1 


I 

2 


I 

3 








1 


2 
2 




2 




1 

3 


1 


76— 100 


2 
1 


i 
i 


1 
I 










101- 125 




1 

i 
i 
i 


1 

2 

3 
I 


2 














1 

2 


1 96— 1 FiO 




I 




i 








151- 175 










1 76— 200 








I 






I 


2 






I 


I 




2 
1 


201— 225 












2 


I 






1 
1 


226- 250 








1 












1 


1 












251— 275 






1 
























I 




276- 300 


















1 






1 




<*ni— a?5 




















I 






2 


I 
















326- 350 






1 




















1 








1 








376- 400 








i 






























426- 450 


1 












































476- 500 




1 


















1 






1 


















526- 550 












1 






















551- 575 


1 


















1 






1 




















576- 600 










1 












1 
1 
















601- 625 












































651- 675 




























1 


1 
1 
















701- 725 












































776- 800 






























1 
















801- 825 










































1 




876- 900 


1 


2 


1 
1 






































976-1,000 




































1 






1,076-1,100 




































1,151-1,175 


















1 




























1,176-1,200 


1 
1 




1 
1 








































1,401-1,425 










































1,626-1,650 










































1,726-1,750 





























































































Second Group and Junior High Schools 



26- 40 


2 
3 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 


1 
1 


























1 


















51- 75 


1 








1 
































101- 125 
























1 


















126- 150 














































201- 225 


























1 


















226- 250 








































1 
1 






251- 275 










































326- 350 






























1 



























































For enrollment in individual high schools, see Table XXIII, page3 226 to 231. 



102 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 76 



Size of Teaching Staff and Size of Enrollment in County High Schools 
for Colored Pupils, Year Ending June 30, 1943 



No. of 
Teachers 


lools 




ndel 














u 










b 


orge's 


ne's 








c 






Average 

No. 
Belonging 


otal No. 
Sigh Scl 


llegany 


nne Aru 


altimore 


alvert 


aroline 


arroll 


ecil 


harles 


orcheste 


rederick 


arford 


oward 


ent 


[ontgorm 


rince Ge 


ueen An 


Mary'; 


>merset 


albot 


r ashingt( 


r icomico 


r orcester 






< 


< 


m 


U 


O 


O 


U 


O 


Q 




Ph 


B 


« 






<y 


W 




Eh 








All Schools. . 


*32 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


3 


l 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


3 



Number of Schools Distributed by Size of Teaching Staff 



2 


*2 
5 
7 
5 
4 
3 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

1 












































*2 


3 


i 




l 

2 
















2 












i 

i 


i 




l 




4 






1 










1 


1 




1 
1 


i 


5 


1 


1 
















6 








1 














l 








1 


7 








1 






1 




1 
















8 


















1 
















9 




































l 








10 




























1 
















12 


















1 


























16 








































l 




20 




l 
















































































Number of Schools Distributed by Size of Enrollment 


26- 50 


2 
*6 
3 
8 
2 
4 
4 

1 

1 

1 
































l 






l 




*2 


51- 75 


i 




1 












1 




1 








1 




76-100 






1 






1 


















101-125 




2 


1 




1 








1 






1 


l 


l 












126-150 










1 




l 
i 










151-175 










1 






1 
1 




1 






















176-200 


















1 






l 






1 


326-350 


























1 








401-425 








































l 




526-550 




l 

















































































* Includes two second-group schools in Worcester County. 
For individual high schools in 1943, see Table XXIII, pages 226 to 231. 



Colored High Schools by Size; City Summer and 103 
Evening Schools 



TABLE 77— Baltimore City Summer Schools, 1942 



Type of School 


No. 
of 
Schools 


Total 
Enrollment 


Net Roll at End 
of Term 


Percent 
of Net Roll 
Recommended 
for Promotion 
Taking 


No. 
of 

Princi- 
pals 
and 

Teach- 
ers 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Taking 


Re- 
view 
Work 


Ad- 
vance 
Work 


Re- 
view 
Work 


Ad- 
vance 
Work 


White Schools 




















Secondary 














90.3 


94.7 


31 




2 


1 , 124 


739 


1 , 719 


1,652 


67 




1 


479 


326 


711 


711 




97.1 




10 


Elementary 


4 


583 


411 


717 


717 




96.4 




18 


Demonstration 


1 


139 


234 


QQ7 
DO 1 




337 




100.6 


14 




1 


227 


254 


462 




462 




99.0 


20 


Total White . 


9 


2, 552 


1 , 964 


3 , 946 


3^080 


866 






93 


Colored Schools 




















Secondary 














98.0 


96.6 






1 


58 


95 


1 AO 


108 


34 


8 






143 


176 


281 


281 




97.6 




7 


Elementary 


4 


693 


862 


1 , 350 


1,350 




86.8 




21 


Demonstration 


1 


127 


237 


351 




35i 




looio 


12 




1 


24 


63 


84 










6 


Total Colored 


7 


1,045 


1,433 


2, 208 


1^739 


469 






54 


All Schools 


















147 


1942 


15 


3,597 


3,397 


6,154 


4,819 


1,335 






1941 


14 


3,261 


3,233 


5,728 


4,987 


741 






120 


1940 


14 


3,641 


3,347 


6,135 


5,370 


765 






127 


1939 


14 


3,644 


3,359 


6,208 


5,505 


703 






121 


1938 


14 


3,299 


3,350 


5,822 


4,917 


905 






128 


1937 


14 


2,905 


2,948 


5,142 


4,290 


852 






121 


1936 


14 


3,400 


3,028 


5, 544 


4,963 


581 






122 


1935 


14 


4,150 


3,929 


7,015 


6,304 


711 






128 


1934 


15 


3,728 


3,472 


6,139 


5,324 


815 






120 


1932 


12 


3,644 


3,263 


6,081 


5,393 


688 






107 


1931 


16 


4,399 


4,088 


7,192 


6,354 


838 






154 



TABLE 78— Baltimore City Adult Education 



Enrollment 



Type of Work 


White 


Colored 


Nights 
in 
















Session 




1943 


1942 


1932 


1943 


1942 


1932 


1942-43 


Americanization 


1,039 


1,670 


1,215 








82 


Academic: 


















52 


74 


583 


945 


1,386 


1,461 


71 


1,402 


2,036 


3,181 


434 


730 


540 


i °82 Jr. 


846 


1,518 


2,704 


224 


359 


350 


) °94 Sr. 


Vocational:* 














j^. Industrial 


737 


1,370 


2,418 


393 


521 


376 


49 


Home Economics 


231 


379 


736 


307 


498 


576 


49 




1,218 


1,906 




473 


653 




32 


National Defense! 


587 


2,001 










49 


17,270 


14,251 




5^464 


1^753 








567 


1,466 










49 



* Vocational courses are reimbursed from federal vocational Smith-Hughes or George-Deen 
funds. Persons taking them are employed at work related to the field in which the course is given. 

t Courses in industrial work not reimbursed from federal funds. The students may be unem- 
ployed or working in fields other than industrial work. 

X Courses in training for war production paid for from federal funds given five nights a week, 
or 6 and 7 days a week over periods of six weeks, continuous throughout the year. 

° The junior high school academic and commercial classes met 82 nights while the senior high 
school academic and commercial classes met 94 nights. 



104 1943 



Report of Maryland State Department 



of Education 



II 



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c 



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u 



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Gllillifll 



Adult Education in County Schools 



105 



Descriptive Titles of Courses Offered in Maryland County Adult Education Program 
under Classifications of Agriculture, Home Economics, Trades and Industries, Business 
Education, General, Excluding Federal Program for Training in War Production, 1942-43 



Agricultuke 

Poultry and swine 1 

Poultry and gardening 2 

Home Economics 

Canning 11 

Canning demonstration 10 

Nutrition and cooking 32 

Food demonstration 9 

Food preparation 3 

Meat extenders and substitutes 2 

Soybeans 1 

Consumer Education 39 

Point rationing 2 

Clothing conservation 10 

Textiles and clothing 1 

Sewing and dressmaking 5 

Needlepoint 1 

Practical nursing 1 

Home decoration 1 

Home management 3 

Trades and Industries 

Blueprint reading 2 

Cabinet making 3 

Furniture repair and rebuilding 2 



Trades and Industries (Cont'd) 

Woodworking 1 

Radio and its repair 4 

General shop 1 

Mechanical drawing 1 

Shop mathematics 2 

Welding 2 

Textile chemistry 1 

Business Education 

Typing 36 

Stenography 4 

Typing and stenography 13 

Typing, stenography and bookkeeping 2 

Bookkeeping 1 

Speedscript 1 

General 

Spanish 11 

Recreational leadership 5 

Physical education 1 

Parent education 1 

English 1 

Public speaking 1 

Chemistry for nurses 1 

War gases 1 



106 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 80 



Service Rendered Cases Referred for Vocational Rehabilitation in Maryland 
During the Year Ending June 30, 1943 













1 

Being 








Total 


Re- 


Being 


Training 


Prepared 


Surveyed, 


Closed 


County 


Number 


habili- 


Followed 


Completed, 


for 


Under 


After 




of 


tated 


on 


Awaiting 


Employ- 


Ad- 


Other 




Cases 




Jobs 


Jobs 


ment 


visement 


Services 


Total Counties.. 


334 


128 


20 


12 


48 


125 


1 


Allegany 


78 


37 


2 


2 


8 


29 




Anne Arundel . . . 


14 


4 


2 




3 


5 






21 


8 


4 


i 


2 


6 




Calvert 


1 


1 












Caroline 


11 




i 




3 


6 




Carroll 


5 


3 








2 




Cecil 


14 


2 


i 


i 


i 


9 






4 


3 




l 








Dorchester 


16 


2 


3 


i 


3 


1 




Frederick 


22 


12 




l 


4 


5 






14 


9 


2 


l 


2 






Harford 


9 


3 


2 




2 


'2 




Howard 


5 


3 








2 




Kent 


7 






i 


2 


4 




Montgomery .... 


16 


9 






1 


6 




Prince George's. 


21 


7 




i 


6 


4 




Queen Anne's. . . 


7 


1 






1 


5 




















Somerset 


i 


2 






i 


4 




Talbot 


4 


1 








2 




Washington 


28 


15 




2 


3 


8 






23 


4 






4 


15 




Worcester 


7 


1 






2 


4 




Baltimore City. . 


619 


230 


43 


35 


81 


202 


28 


Total State 


953 


358 


63 


47 


129 


327 


29 



See further data on vocational rehabilitation on page 157. 



Vocational Rehabilitation and Training for War Production 107 



VOCATIONAL TRAINING FOR WAR PRODUCTION WORKERS 

IN 1942-43 

The program of Vocational Training for War Production 
Workers is administered through three levels of authority. 1. 
The U. S. Office of Education, as designated by Congress, is 
charged with financial disbursement to the States and with de- 
termination of policies and regulations which are in agreement 
with the national manpower program. 2. The State Board 
of (Vocational) Education administers the program in accord 
with a State Plan formulated to carry out prescribed policies 
and regulations approved by the U. S. Office of Education. 3. 
The twenty-three county Boards of Education and the Board 
of School Commissioners in Baltimore City administer the plan 
locally. Total costs for instruction, supervision, supplemental 
and additional equipment, and operation of buildings are paid 
from the State's allocation of the Federal appropriation. In 
1942-43 the total cost of the program was $1,371,181. (See Table 
81.) 

With the creation of the War Manpower Commission, and 
the listing of nonessential occupations, the emphasis was placed 
on the transfer of manpower from nonessential to war produc- 
tion occupations. It was found necessary in the program for 
vocational training for war production to give young men pre- 
employment or pre-induction training, since under present poli- 
cies they will enter either industry or the armed forces. There 
were 20,982 men and women given pre-employment courses in 
1942-43. 

The pre-employment training for the in-school group gained 
considerable momentum. Schedules in some high schools were 
revised to provide 15 hours of war production training during 
the regular school week. Courses in this program usually oper- 
ate from 12 to 18 weeks, but in a few cases are approved for 30 
weeks. Admittance into these classes is open to boys of sixteen. 
Although in general the program is scheduled in the senior year 
only, it is possible to admit juniors and sophomores who are 
over-age, when there is reasonable assurance the individual will 
not be able to finish high school. 

In the supplementary program, pre-induction classes have 
been organized for many industries. Although the content of 
the instruction may be elementary and similar to pre-employment 
training, this program is classified as supplementary training 
because the individuals are not available to the labor market. 
In some cases the employer assigns a paid trainee group to a 
war production training school. In other cases instructors of 
the Vocational Training for War Production Workers staff give 
in-plant instruction to paid trainee groups. The industries have 
cooperated in the planning of courses, procurement of instruc- 
tional materials, and release or loan of skilled workers to teach 
in the vocational war training shops. 



108 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 81 



Vocational Defense Training, Cumulative Enrollment and Expenditures for 
Salaries, Supplies, Operation, Maintenance and Equipment, 
July 1, 1942 to June 30, 1943 



Cumulative 


Enrollment 




FOR 




Pre- 


Sup- 


Out 


Employ- 


plement- 


of 


ment 


ary 


School 


Courses 


Courses 


Youth 


2,813 


7,254 


2,587 


7,110 


15,654 


5,109 


5,513 


8,130 


5,605 


404 


484 


479 


570 


216 


296 


725 


4,318 


306 




281 


* *65 




74 


102 


"34 


329 


71 


199 




12 


276 


'244 


331 




283 


209 


"5i 


613 


285 




529 


164 


'543 


415 






95 


' '79 


"l2 


170 


1,018 


176 


241 


454 


361 


170 






71 






44 






278 






26 


l!608 


1^466 


475 


16 




83 






103 


15,469 


12,105 




8,236 


15,669 


2,587 


20,772 


27,705 


5,109 


20,982 


20,235 


5,605 



County 



Expenditures for 



Salaries, Supplies, Operation 
and Maintenance for 



Vocational 
Educational 
Defense 
Training 



Out 
of 
School 
Youth 



Equipment 



Total Counties: 

1941* 

1942* 

1943 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel .... 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Baltimore City . . . 
Md. Penitentiary . 

State Office 

Follow-up Survey 

Total State: 

1941* 

1942* 

1943 



$133,501.73 
313,776.44 
347,501.23 

$48,338.82 
43,553.75 
71,019.62 



5,533.41 
4,449.81 
5,067.36 
2,930.44 
5,812.64 
9,654.15 
15,704.86 
24,802.36 

' *783!44 
46,201.31 
23,537.96 



39,399.71 
711.59 



$638,142.15 
313.86 
24,128.66 
2,610.88 



$335,855.65 
714,494.97 
1,012,696.78 



$68,613.60 
96,617.40 
116,691.34 

$12,136.65 
9,337.21 
8,470.39 
3,406.11 
.3,406.51 
4,036.24 

5 ',233 '.92 
4,470.37 
9,829.85 
8,253.74 
5,763.28 
2,901.62 
7,192.81 
3,927.94 
4,525.11 
573.91 
528.43 
3,526.02 
1,365.99 
16,090.15 
1,350.05 
365.04 



$34,606.84 
129,187.73 
115,942.28 

$17,596.43 
16,092.21 
33,814.66 



3,564.06 
2,422.46 

' '867!86 
548.33 

15*,387'.88 

' *3i5'.45 
3,262.41 
17,972.23 



4,098.30 



$111,933.47 



$13,913.72 



$79,522.63 
103,151.20 
130,605.06 



$75,143.14 
184,978.06 
227,875.75 



t$512, 151.23 
fl, 008, 287. 48 
1,371,177.59 



* Excludes enrollment in National Youth Administration program of 1,353 in 1941 and 517 in 1942. 

t Includes expenditure for National Youth Administration program of $18,633.82 in 1941 and $4,486.08 in 1942. 



Vocational Training for War Production 



109 



Supplementary classes in mechanic learner training for en- 
listed men selected by the U. S. Army have been set up in co- 
operation with the Civil Service Commission and with men in 
U. S. Army electrical work. For several months the training 
program for the U. S. Signal Corps was conducted at various 
centers within the State and Baltimore City. For beginners the 
course was titled Mechanic Learner Radio, and for advanced 
students Junior Repairman Trainee course. 

Greater effort was thrown into follow-up of those who had 
taken pre-employment courses so that the single skilled workmen 
might be taught additional skills and war production workers 
might be retrained for jobs for which there is a current demand 
and for which they are better adapted. 

Effective service has been rendered the training within in- 
dustry program through job-instructor, job-methods, and job- 
relations training. These are highly intensive terminal courses 
scheduled for from 10 to 20 hours. It is excellent as far as it 
goes, but from the standpoint of individual growth requires 
supplementary training of an extensive type. Consequently a 
program is offered in foremanship, human engineering and lead- 
ership training through which workers can take advantage of 
the opportunities for continuous up-grading as they undertake 
new and potential responsibilities. In addition, Foreman Train- 
ing Conference Leader courses have been organized to equip 
men in personnel, planning, and production with techniques of 
procedure in handling conferences in their respective fields. 

The supplementary program reached 20,235 individuals in 
1942-43. 

The U. S. Employment Service was charged with the re- 
sponsibility of recruiting trainees for the pre-employment pro- 
gram. Since only a small percentage of trainees was referred 
by the U. S. E. S., it became necessary for the administrative 
units of the vocational training for war production service to do 
their own recruiting. With excellent cooperation of the press 
and radio, and through exhibits, plant visits, posters and re- 
leases through the public schools, news of the program has been 
brought before the public. 

Very few women were trained in the Federal training pro- 
gram during its first year. The number increased rapidly during 
the second year, and reached 9,810 white and negro women in 
1942-43 as they proved their adaptability for many occupations 
in the war industries and it was found that their work in some 
occupations is superior to that formerly done by men. The suc- 
cessful placement of women in war industries is dependent upon 
the elimination of fear in handling tools and machines, and the 
development of adequate understanding of industrial processes 
and of technical knowledge essential to the various occupations. 



110 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



Much attention has been given to providing for the negro 
facilities in every type of war production training. The U. S. 
Employment Service cooperated in making a study of the need 
for skilled and semi-skilled negro trade workers. At first the 
program was retarded since few opportunities for employment 
were open to negroes in this area. However, with increased 
employment, interest grew. New and additional facilities were 
provided, and in 1942-43 the training of 6,638 negro men and 
women was very successful. 

Maryland pioneered in developing The Rural War Produc- 
tion Training Program into training for farm machinery main- 
tenance and repair. Regulations governing the Rural War Pro- 
duction Training Program in 1942-43 permitted closer relations 
with Vocational Agriculture in the public high school program 
and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. The Food for Freedom 
Program launched by the Department of Agriculture set forth 
major objectives for production, which were similar to the edu- 
cational objectives of the Rural War Production Training Pro- 
gram. Consequently all departments and agencies cooperated 
and contributed towards the successful inauguration of the farm 
machinery repair and maintenance program. With 5,605 indi- 
viduals enrolled in 117 centers, approximately 40,000 pieces of 
equipment were repaired. It is estimated there was a state cov- 
erage of approximately 40% of the farms. 

It was first thought that farm machinery repair would be 
a seasonal course during the fall and winter, but in the major 
agricultural sections the centers were open all summer and re- 
ported good attendance. With the additional plant and equip- 
ment available, an increase of about 30% in participation during 
the fall, winter, and spring months is expected. 

The program in food preservation and canning brought to 
the public new modern and more efficient ways for home canning 
and food preservation. The tin can, pressure cooker and retort 
have supplemented the more conventional containers and pro- 
cesses. The challenge before the program represnts a real op- 
portunity for education and service to the community, and will 
contribute equally toward the war effort in meeting food produc- 
tion goals. 

The entire war production program reached a total of 46,822 
individuals in the various parts of the program at a cost of 
$1,143,302 for operation and $227,876 for equipment. The cost 
per person given training or service was less than $25. The ex- 
penditure on equipment in 1942-43 per individual enrolled was 
less than 85. 



TABLE 82 

School Current Expenses from State, Federal, and Local Funds and Capital 
Outlay by Boards of Education in the Counties and Baltimore City, 1922-1943 



Year 


Current Expense Disbursements 


Capital 
Outlay 


Ending 
July 31 


Total 


From State 
Funds 


From Federal 
Funds 


From Local 
Funds 



Total Counties 



1923 


$5,964,456 


$2,005,335 


$t33,710 


$3,925,411 


$1,475,269 


1924 


6,475,803 


2,041,155 


f43,244 


4,391,404 


949,720 


1925 


6,743,015 


2,130,518 


f43,252 


4,569,245 


2,527,823 


1926 


7,143,150 


2,212,857 


148,010 


4,882,283 


2,602,745 


1927 


7,517,720 


2.291,235 


t48,965 


5,177,529 


1, 023, 362 


1928 


7,787,298 


x°2,207,335 


151,910 


5,528,053 


1,532,718 


1929 


8,164,657 


x°2,279,589 


f54,425 


5,830,643 


1 ,773,070 


1930 


8,456,414 


x2, 299, 380 


t69,779 


6,087,255 


2,450,144 


1931 


8,852,073 


2,323,767 


f78,755 


6,449,551 


2,172,088 


1932 


8,892,181 


2,661,382 


t77,470 


6,153,329 


1,650,065 


1933 


8,485,146 


2,531,668 


178,343 


5,875,135 


688,497 


1934 


8,010,425 


3,622,840 


t67,903 


4,319,682 


1,132,433 


1935 


8,189,909 


3,665,763 


t75,727 


4,448,419 


1,590,879 


1936 


8,715,542 


3,580,265 


f84,854 


5,050,423 


2,000,321 


1937 


9,082,523 


3,583,329 


192,553 


5,406,641 


2,531,071 


1938 


9,893,912 


4,219,147 


U44.854 


5,529,911 


1,576,434 


1939 


10,216,150 


4.300,033 


tl66,016 


5,750,101 


2,845,537 


1940 


10,752,978 


4,415,744 


fl66,215 


6,171,019 


2 , 773 , 778 


1941 


§11,108,701 


4,406,610 


§tl67,417 


6.534,674 


1,116,817 


1942 


§11,687,272 


4,828,593 


§tl85,G69 


6.673,610 


1,483,259 


1943 


§12,185,970 


4,830,993 


§U88,549 


7,166,428 


816,813 



*Baltimorf City 



1923 


$6,799,794 


$1,052,845 


$13,256 


$5,733,693 


$3,301,086 


1924 


6,794,048 


1,046,561 


14,551 


5,732,936 


5,336,889 


1925 


7,237,993 


1.024,179 


18,301 


6,195,513 


3,224,734 


1926 


7,480,170 


1,034,372 


22,522 


6,423,276 


3,484,767 


1927 


7,878,719 


1,066,385 


20,112 


6,792,222 


4,200,038 


1928 


8,360,391 


x999,753 


17,240 


7,343,398 


1,897,871 


1929 


8,767,395 


xl, 017, 153 


20,338 


7,729,904 


633 , 632 


1930 


9,193,068 


x976,083 


18,980 


8,198,005 


1,508,678 


1931 


9,666,385 


932,251 


13,773 


8,720,361 


3,658,046 


1932 


9,415,054 


974,431 


11,131 


8,429,492 


2,678,922 


1933 


8,388,125 


1,072,738 


10,663 


7,304,724 


1 *>?° ' - 


1934 


7,992,222 


948,586 


10,081 


7.09° 1 




1935 


8,502,074 


954,383 


25 n*« 






1936 


8,744,298 


946 








1937 


9,031,032 










1938 


9,347,234 










1939 


9,747,952 










1940 


9,845,208 










1941 


§10,238,979 










1942 


§10,301,657 










1943 


§9,741,713 











1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 



$12 
13 
13 
14 
15 
16 
16 
17 
18 
18 
16 
16 
16 
17 
18 
19 
19 
20 
§21 
§21 
§21 



,764,250 
,269,851 
,981,008 
,623,320 
,396,448 
,147,689 
,932,052 
,649,482 
,518,458 
,307,235 
,873,271 
,002,647 
,691.983 
,459,840 
,113,555 
,241.146 
,964,102 
,598,186 
,347,680 
,988,929 
,927,683 



* Includes expenditures from City f 
excludes amounts appropriated by City 

t Includes amounts received from 1 
Indian Head. 

xExcludes receipts from liquidation o, 

° Excludes $6,500 to be used by Char 

'' — ■■■■ MM" ' 



112 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 20 

Total School Current Expenses and Total State Aid in 23 Counties and 
Baltimore City*, 1920 to 1943 



'mm 




Z&g§*}9ZZ 1924 1926 1928 1930 1932 1934 1936 1938 1940 1942 1944 1946 



ludes expenditures from City funds for training teachers in City training school (s), 
hut excludes amounts appropriated by City and State for the Retirement Fund for teachers 
o^-forwl&W data, see Tables 82 and 83, pages 111 to 113 and Tables XI and XIII, pages 213 
and ^&ftm&iba noted that the expenditures for 1943 cover an eleven-month period 
&j^^"^V**B»2'to June 30, 1943, whereas figures for other years cover twelve months. 



3HS Si 



<oi- 



•c eo ^ S « oj oo _ „ 



8« 



£ g S a N or oo ~ 7 ' — 

fi. ■ •. ■ ■ ■ ~ ,' - ~ -r ^ 




Percent of Current Expenses from State, Federal 
and Local Sources 



113 



TABLE 83 

Percent of Current Expense Disbursements Received by County 
Boards of Education from State* and Federal* Funds 
from August 1, 1942 to June 30, 1943 



County 



Total Counties. 

St. Mary's 

Charles 

Somerset 

Calvert. ...... 

Garrett 

Caroline 

Dorchester. . . . 

Worcester 

Howard 

Queen Anne's. . 

Carroll 

Wicomico 

Anne Arundel . . 

Kent 

Talbot 

Allegany. 

Prince George's 

Frederick 

Harford 

Cecil 

Washington 

Baltimore 

Montgomery . . . 

Baltimore City . 

Total State 



Total 
Disburse- 
ments 

for 
Current 
Expenses! 



$12,185,970 

172,560 
287,157 
242,142 
148,334 
373,229 
230, ( 
336,132 
256,046 
260,981 
206,246 
506,574 
396,678 
856,723 
168,457 
217,164 
1,091,769 
1,248,691 
655,801 
438,301 
334,888 
868,885 
1,527,954 
1,360,575 



°9, 720, 321 
$21,906,291 



Amount Received for Current 
Expenses from 



State 
Aid*f 



$4,830,993 

130,983 
180,136 
175,301 
101,399 
254,645 
141,396 
196,253 
137,912 
137,639 
106,446 
255,214 
187,624 
397,158 
75,617 
89,455 
408,842 
443,898 
232,551 
132,194 
102,097 
239,807 
443,163 
261,263 

°92 1,520 

$5,752,513 



Fed- 
eral 
Aid*f 



$188,549 

5,164 
J41.964 
1,090 
2,602 
5,360 
6,588 
4,673 
2,961 
3,984 
3,523 
4,509 
1,933 
7,302 
1,281 
3,066 

14,823 

12,460 
5,463 

12,513 
3,067 

19,512 
6,622 

18,089 

64,354 



County 
Levy and 
Other 
County 
Sources 



$7,166,428 

36,413 
65,057 
65,751 
44,333 
113,224 
82,699 
135,206 
115,173 
119,358 
96,277 
246,851 
207,121 
452,263 
91,559 
124,643 
668,104 
792,333 
417,787 
293 , 594 
229,724 
609,566 
1,078,169 
1,081,223 

°8, 734, 447 



Percent of Current Expense 
Disbursements Received from 



Shi 



w 



28.0 

42.4 
33.5 
41.3 
36.8 
22.9 
32.8 
32.8 
35.6 
28.3 
33.7 
27.5 
32.8 
26.9 
34.7 
34.2 
25.5 
26.5 
28.0 
30.2 
30.5 
25.2 
29.0 
19.2 

9.5 



$252,903 $15,900,875 19.8 6.5 26.3 1.1 72-6 



3 

<d a 
U 

72 



11.6 

33.5 
29.2 
31.1 
31.6 
45 
28.5 
25.6 
18. 
24.5 
17.9 
22.9 
14.5 
19.4 
10.2 
7.0 
11.9 
9.0 
7.5 



2.4 



39.6 

75.9 

62.7 

72.4 

68.4 

68.2 

61.3 

58.4 

53.9 

52.8 

51.6 

50 

47 

46 

44 

41 

37 



9.5 



* Includes State and Federal aid for 1942-43 received after June 30, 1943, but excludes Federal 
aid for Vocational Training for War Production Workers shown on page 108. 

t Excludes estimated State, Federal and County funds for public school health services expended 
by County and City health offices. 

t Includes $36,819.93 expended by Federal government toward salaries and expenses at Indian 
Head. 

° Excludes $899,799 for teachers in Baltimore City Retirement System of which $564,897 came 
from State funds and $334,902 from local funds; and $21,392 for Coppin Teachers College. 
For detailed data, see Tables XI-XIII, pages 213 to 215. 



114 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 21 



PERCENT OF CURRENT EXPENDITURES FOR YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1943 



County- 



State, Excluding Equalization Fund 
Equalization Fund 



Received from 

fc£££>) Federal Aid 

WMBk County Levy and Other County Sources 



Total 

St. Mary's 

Charles 

Somerset 

Calvert 

Garrett 

Caroline 

Dorchester 

Worcester 

Howard 

Queen Anne's 

Carroll 

Wicomico 

Anne Arundel 

Kent 

Talbot 

j 

Allegany 
Prince George's 
Frederick 
Harford 
Cecil 

Washington 

Baltimore 

Montgomery 

Baltimore City 
Total State 




For basic data, see Table 83 and Tables XI-XIII, pages 213 to 215. 



Source of Funds; Distribution of School Tax Dollar 



115 



TABLE 84— Percent Distribution of School Expenditures By County School 
Boards from August 1, 1942 to June 30, 1943 



County 



Percent of Total Current Expense Funds Used for 



.3 o 



B J) H 



♦Including Cost of Transportation 



County Average 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Baltimore City . 

State Average . . 



2.6 


1 


5 


67 


9 


3 


6 


7 


7 


2 


.8 


12.8 


1 


1 


6.3 


2.0 


2 


1 


67 


4 


4 


4 


10 





2 


9 


10.3 




9 


2.4 


3.3 


1 


2 


67 





3 


5 


7 


3 


2 


5 


13.6 


1 


6 


6.8 


2.3 


1 


3 


73 


8 


2 


6 


8 





1 


7 


9.9 




4 


10.8 


4.8 


2 


8 


55 


7 


2 


3 


5 


8 


2 


1 


25.8 




7 


4.0 


3.7 


1 


4 


61 


8 


2 


6 


7 


7 


2 


4 


19.4 


1 





.5 


2.5 


2 





62 


9 


3 


6 


5 


8 


2 


3 


19.1 


1 


8 


.1 


2.6 




3 


68 


8 


4 


5 


6 


8 


1 


2 


13.8 


1 





.2 


2.3 


1 


5 


57 


4 


2 


7 


12 


2 


2 


4 


21.0 




5 


2.1 


3.1 


1 


4 


62 


4 


2 


7 


7 


8 


3 


.4 


17.7 


1 


5 




2.2 


1 





65 


6 


3 


7 


6 


4 


2 


.7 


17.4 


1 





' ' .9 


3.4 


" 1 


4 


55 


4 


2 


2 


4 


8 


4 


3 


24.0 


4 


5 


.5 


2.2 


1 


5 


74 


3 


3 





6 


4 


3 


.0 


8.8 




8 


.4 


3.0 


1 


3 


62 


5 


3 


5 


6 


5 


2 


5 


19.7 


1 





1.1 


4.5 


2 


2 


63 


4 


3 


5 


5 


3 


1 


8 


18.7 




6 




2.2 


1 


6 


72 


5 


4 


2 


9 


5 


2 


.6 


6.6 




8 


'7:7 


1.9 


1 




71 


5 


4 


8 


8 


2 


5 


7 


5.8 


1 





19.2 


4.0 




6 


60 


3 


2 


9 


7 


3 


3 





19.5 


1 


4 


.1 


4.5 


2 


5 


58 


6 


3 


1 


4 







8 


26.0 




5 


.8 


3.3 


1 


6 


64 


2 


3 


1 


7 


1 


1 


7 


18.4 




6 


8.2 


4.2 


1 


7 


63 


3 


3 





6.7 


2 


4 


17.8 




9 


.6 


2.2 


1 


7 


73 


2 


4 





7 


2 


2 


7 


8.1 




9 


.9 


3.0 


1 


1 


66 


4 


3 


8 


6 


4 


1 


9 


15.5 


1 


9 


14.1 


3.2 


1 


4 


61 


2 


2 


4 


8 


1 


2 


.5 


20.3 




9 


2.2 


3.1 


1 


6 


75 


7 


3 


7 


11 


1 


2 


1 


2.5 


t-2 


.2 


2.8 


1 


6 


71 


3 


3 


6 


9 


2 


2 


.5 


8.3 




7 


3.7 



♦Excluding Cost of Transportation 



County Average 


3 





1 


7 


77 


3 


4 


1 


8 


8 


3 


2 


.7 


1.2 


7.1 


Allegany 


2 


2 


2 


4 


74 


5 


4 


8 


11 


1 


3 


o 


.8 


1.0 


2.6 


Anne Arundel 


3 


8 


1 


3 


76 


9 


4 





8 


4 


2 


9 


.9 


1.8 


7.8 


Baltimore 


2 


5 


1 


5 


81 


3 


2 


9 


8 


8 


1 


9 


.6 


.5 


11.8 




6 


4 


3 


7 


74 


7 


3 


1 


7 


7 


2 


9 


.5 


1.0 


5.2 




4 


6 


1 


7 


76 


5 


3 


2 


9 


5 


3 





.3 


1.2 


.6 


Carroll 


3 


1 


2 


5 


76 


9 


4 


4 


7 


1 


2 


8 


1.0 


2.2 


.1 


Cecil 


3 





1 


4 


79 


6 


5 


2 


7 


8 


1 


4 


.4 


1.2 


.2 




2 


9 


1 


9 


72 


2 


3 


3 


15 


3 


3 


1 


.6 


.7 


2.6 


Dorchester 


3 


8 


1 


7 


75 


4 


3 


3 


9 


4 


4 


1 


.5 


1.8 




Frederick 


2 


7 


1 


2 


79 


2 


4 


4 


. 7 


8 


3 


3 


.2 


1.2 


i'.i 


Garrett 


4 


5 


1 


8 


71 


7 


2 


8 


6 


2 


5 


6 


1.5 


5.9 


.7 




2 


5 


1 


6 


80 


8 


3 


3 


6 


9 


3 


2 


.8 


.9 


.4 




3 


7 


1 


6 


77 


3 


4 


3 


8 


1 


3 


1 


.6 


1.3 


1.4 




5 


6 


2 


7 


77 


6 


4 


2 


6 


5 


2 


1 


. 5 


.8 




Montgomery 


2 


3 


1 


7 


77 


1 


4 


5 


10 





2 


8 


.8 


.8 


's'.i 


Prince George's 


2 





1 


2 


75 


2 


5 


1 


8 


6 


6 





.8 


1.1 


20.0 


Queen Anne's 


4 


9 


2 





73 


8 


3 


6 


8 


9 


3 


7 


1.4 


1.7 


.1 


St. Mary's 


6 





3 


3 


78 


8 


4 


1 


5 


4 


1 


1 


.5 


.8 


1.1 




4 


1 


2 





78 


2 


3 


8 


8 


6 


2 


1 


.5 


.7 


9.9 


Talbct 


5 


1 


2 





76 


4 


3 


5 


8 


1 


2 


9 


.9 


1.1 


.7 


Washington 


2 


3 


1 


9 


79 


4 


4 


4 


7 


8 


2 


9 


.3 


1.0 


1.0 


Wicomico 


3 


5 


1 


2 


78 


2 


4 


5 


7 


6 


2 


3 


.5 


2.2 


16.2 




4 





1 


8 


76 


3 


3 





10 


1 


3 


1 


.7 


1.0 


2.8 


Baltimore City 


3 


1 


1 


7 


75 


9 


3 


7 


11 


2 


2 


1 


2.1 


t-2 


.2 


State Average 


3 





1 


7 


76 


7 


3 


9 


9 


9 


2 


6 


1.4 


.8 


3.9. 



♦ Auxiliary agencies exclude estimated expenditures by health offices in counties and Balti- 
more City for services rendered to school children. The upper table includes cost of transportation 
in auxiliary agencies and the lower table excludes cost of transportation. Expenditures from Federal 
funds for Vocational Training for War Production are excluded. 

t Baltimore City expenditures for the Retirement System are excluded. 



116 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



CHART 22 

How Tax Dollar for School Current Expenses was Used in 1942-43 in the 

Maryland Counties 



INCLUDING TRANSPORTATION 




EXCLUDING TRANSPORTATION 




* Fixed charges and payments to adjoining counties. 

x Auxiliary agencies exclude estimated expenditures by health offices in counties for 
services rendered to school childrn. The upper circle includes cost of transportation with 
auxiliary agencies (12.80, while the lower circle excludes cost of transportation from auxiliary 
agencies (.7<t). Expenditures from Federal funds for Vocational Training for War Pro- 
duction Workers are excluded. 

For basic data, see Tables XIII, XV and XVI, pages 215, 217 and 218. 



The County School Tax Dollar; Cost per Pupil 



117 



TABLE 85 

Cost Per Pupil Belonging for General Control 



County 



1941 



1942 



1943* 



County 



1941 


1942 


1943* 


$2.34 


$2.28 


$2.21 


1.94 


2.02 


2.04 


2.01 


1.98 


1.84 


1.74 


1.66 


1.83 


1.91 


1.99 


1.73 


1.59 


1.81 


1.60 


1.47 


1.48 


1.50 


1.38 


1.30 


1.50 


1.61 


1.63 


1.47 


1.34 


1.41 


1.35 


1.33 


1.47 


1.26 


2.99 


3.14 


2.81 


2.31 


2.38 


2.23 



County Average 

Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Kent 

Calvert 

Talbot 

Garrett 

Caroline 

Dorche?ter. 

Somerset 

Worcester 

Anne Arundel . . 
Wicomico 



$1.86 

3.34 
4.10 
3.32 
3.66 
3.24 



$1.90 



51 
02 
56 
87 
12 
03 
10 
24 
2.40 
2.31 
1.98 
2.36 



$1.86 

3.62 
3.53 
47 
23 
18 
92 
86 
38 
33 
25 
2.25 
2.22 



Howard 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Montgomery. . . 

Charles 

Frederick 

Allegany 

Washington 

Harford 

Baltimore 

Prince George's 

Baltimore City 

Total State 



* For eleven months from August 1, 1942 to June 30, 1943. 
For basic data, see Table XIV, page 216. 



TABLE 86 

Average Current Expense Costf Per County White Elementary and White 
High School Pupil Belonging, 1923-1943 



Year 



Average Cost Per 
County White Pupil 
Belonging in 



Elemen- 
tary 
Schools 



High 
Schools 



Year 



Average Cost Per 
County White Pupil 
Belonging in 



Elemen- 
tary 
Schools 



High 
Schools 



1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 



$39.84 
43.06 
43.67 
46.02 
47.26 
47.81 
49.49 
49.78 
50.17 
49.27 
46.95 



$91.12 
96.44 
95.16 
97.20 
98.43 
95.82 
96.00 
97.60 
98.54 
94.78 
82.62 



1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 



$44.36 


$76.21 


45.16 


77.58 


*48.90 


80.48 


*51.24 


82.47 


*54.86 


90.87 


*54.95 


89.96 


*57.70 


91.45 


*58.48 


93.49 


*61.30 


97.86 


*62.42 


102.57 



t Excluding general control and fixed charges. 

* Part of this amount is due to inclusion of estimated expenditures on public wh ite elementary 
school children by county health offices from State and county funds. These figures, were first in- 
cluded in 1936. 

For basic data for 1943, see Tables XVIII and XIX, pages 220 and 221. 



11U REPORT OP MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



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Cost per Pupil by Types of Schools 
CHART 23 



119 



County 

County Average 

Calvert 

Montgomery 

Queen Anne's 

Kent 

Charles 

St. Mary's 

Worcester 

Dorchester 

Talbot 

Garrett 

Somerset 

Allegany* 

Wicomico* 

Carroll 

Caroline 

Frederick 

Howard 

Anne Arundel 

Washington 

Cecil 

Prince George's 

Harford 

Baltimore* 

Baltimore Cityt 

State 



COST PER WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL RJFIL BELONGING 
FOR CURRENT EXPENSES EXCLUDING GENERAL CONTROL 

1941 1942 1943 
$ 58 $ 61 



78 
72 
67 
67 
67 
84 
63 
64 
65 
63 
56 
64 
58 
58 
57 
56 
60 
57 
52 
59 
49 
53 
53 

75 

63 





* Excludes pupils attending elementary school at State teachers college, 
f Data for elementary schools only. Excludes corresponding figures for junior high 
schools : $107 in 1943, $106 in 1942 and $98 in 1941. 

For basic data by county, see Table XVIII, page 220. 

County average for 1943 includes estimated expenditure cf $1.72 per pupil by State 
and County Departments of Health for nine months from October 1, 1942 to June 30, 1943. 



120 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 88 



Cost Per Pupil in White Elementary Schools, Grades 1-7 (8), for the Main 
Subdivisions of Expenditures, Exclusive of General Control, from 
August 1, 1942 to June 30, 1943 



COUN1Y 


Super- 
vision 


Salaries 


Text- 
books 
and 
Other 
Costs of 

In- 
struotion 


Opera- 
tion 


Main- 
tenance 


Auxiliary 
Agencies* 


Total 
Current 

Ex- 
penses 


Capital 
Outlay 


County Average: 



















1942 


$1.39 


$39.60 


$2.00 


$5.28 


$2.10 


$10.93 


$61.30 


?9.42 


1943 


1.24 


41.82 


1.81 


5.26 


1.85 


10.44 


62.42 


5.57 




1.54 


44.67 


2.32 


7.01 


1.63 


9.18 


66.35 


1.47 




1.06 


39.12 


1.81 


4.87 


2.02 


12.52 


61.40 


8.81 




.75 


36.83 


.77 


4.55 


.84 


7.71 


51.45 


10.18 




3.17 


36.15 


2.17 


6.15 


2.44 


27.03 


77.11 


1.73 




1.80 


37.78 


1.37 


3.93 


1.07 


16.76 


62.71 


.01 


Carroll 


1.33 


40.16 


1.88 


3.76 


1.57 


U5.51 


64.21 




Cecil 


1.05 


39.22 


2.08 


3.45 


.82 


11.69 


58.31 


"!63 




1.52 


37.32 


1.71 


11.86 


1.76 


19.63 


73.80 


2.19 




1.36 


43.55 


1.39 


6.02 


2.33 


15.25 


69.90 






.86 


39.61 


1.65 


4.18 


2.17 


14.02 


62.49 


.39 




1.58 


41.08 


1.00 


3.56 


2.69 


18.82 


68.73 


.48 




1.27 


39.37 


1.16 


3.39 


1.25 


7.71 


54.15 


.06 




1.22 


38.34 


1.89 


4.43 


1.30 


14.99 


62.17 


.51 


Kent 


3.02 


44.68 


1.74 


5.10 


.81 


18.95 


74.30 






1.35 


54.69 


2.75 


7.91 


2.36 


7.58 


76.64 






.80 


40.35 


2.05 


4.96 


3.46 


4.35 


55.97 


15.17 




2.16 


44.77 


2.24 


4.93 


2.27 


18.79 


75.16 




St. Mary's 


2.69 


39.77 


1.27 


2.57 


.64 


26.12" 


73.06 


i".18 




1.79 


40.06 


2.67 


5.12 


.70 


16.52 


66.86 




Talbot 


2.11 


41.67 


1.19 


5.97 


1.94 


16.64 


69.52 


' [77 




1.53 


43.11 


2.37 


4.81 


2.02 


6.40 


60.24 


.76 




.86 


42.06 


2.43 


4.83 


1.41 


14.09 


65.68 


22.91 




1.83 


41.29 


1.03 


6.49 


2.03 


19.44 


72.11 


3.85 


Baltimore City Ele- 




















1.54 


54.73 


2.23 


9.24 


1.86 


1.83 


71.43 


.15 




$1.33 


$45.85 


$1.94 


$6.50 


$1.85 


$7.76 


$65.23 


$3.88 



* Includes estimated expenditures by State and County Departments of Health on services to 
school children, an average of $1.72 for the counties for nine months from October 1, 1942 to June 
30, 1943. 

t Includes 25 cents for payment by Frederick County for transporting 56 pupils to an elementary 
school in Carroll County. 

For basic data, see Table XVIII. page 220- 



Cost per White Elementary School Pupil 



121 



TABLE 89 

Cost Per Pupil Belonging in White One-Teacher, Two-Teacher and Graded 
Schools from August 1, 1942 to June 30, 1943, Exclusive of Expenditures 
for General Control, Supervision and Fixed Charges 



County 



One- 
Teacher 
Schools 



No. 



Cost 
Per 
Pupil 



County 



Two- 
Teacher 
Schools 



No. 



Cost 
Per 
Pupil 



County 



County Average 

1942 

1943 

Worcester 

Montgomery. . . . 

Talbot 

Prince George's. 

Carroll 

Dorchester 

Charles 

Garrett 

Frederick 

Queen Anne's . . . 

Wicomico 

Somerset 

St. Mary's 

Allegany 

Howard 

Kent 

Washington 

Harford 

Cecil 



160 
143 

1 
7 
3 
7 
2 

17 
2 

38 
1 
5 
3 
6 
4 
7 
4 
1 
8 

16 

11 



$69.49 
72.56 

104.61 
103.20 
100.55 
95.32 
93.48 
84.92 
81.28 
76.95 
73.71 
69.92 
69.29 
68.74 
67.26 
66.99 
64.27 
63.15 
61.52 
57.46 
52.33 



County Average 

1942 

1943 

Somerset 

Queen Anne's. . . 

Kent 

Talbot 

Worcester 

Dorchester 

Wicomico 

Montgomery 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Carroll 

St. Mary's 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Frederick 

Charles 

Garrett 

Prince George's. 

Cecil 

Harford 

Washington 

Baltimore 

Allegany 

Howard 



110 

108 



$68.53 
68.56 

91.21 
87.37 
86.22 
84.75 
84.29 
81.49 
81.19 
80.10 
79.40 
77.82 
77.70 
76.90 
71.05 
66.86 
66.77 
64.21 
64.12 
57.61 
56.65 
56.23 
56.18 
53.90 
41.60 



County Average: 

1942 

1943 

Montgomery 

Calvert 

Charles 

Queen Anne's . . . 

Worcester 

Kent 

Allegany 

Talbot 

Garrett 

Wicomico 

Somerset 

St. Mary's 

Dorchester 

Carroll 

Howard 

Frederick 

Anne Arundel . . . 

Caroline 

Washington 

Cecil 

Prince George's. . 

Harford 

Baltimore 



Includes estimated expenditures by State and County Departments of Health on servees to 
school children. 



122 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

CHART 24 



COST PER WHITE HIGH SCHOOL PUPIL BELONGING 
FOR CURRENT EXPENSES EXCLUDING GENERAL CONTROL 



County 


1941 


1942 


County Average 


# 93 


| 98 


Queen Anne's 


119 


133 


Charles 


128 


131 


Calvert 


128 


129 


Montgomery 


118 


116 


Dorchester 


104 


115 


Howard 


91 


105 


Somerset 


100 


113 


St. Mary's 


114 


123 


Carroll 


101 


108 


Talbot 


102 


111 


Caroline 


104 


111 


Garrett 


101 


104 


Worcester 


108 


107 


Cecil 


104 


107 


Kent 


101 


110 


Washington 


91 


98 


Wicomico 


90 


99 


Prince George's 


85 


91 


Frederick 


89 


95 


Anne Arundel 


88 


93 


Allegany 


82 


84 


Harford 


87 


91 


Baltimore 


80 


81 


Baltimore Citjrt 


125 


138 


State 


102 


107 




t Data for senior high schools only. Excludes corresponding figures for junior high 
schools: $107 in 1943, $106 in 1942 and $98 in 1941; and for vocational schools: $191 in 1943, 
$175 in 1942, and $147 in 1941. 

For basic data by county, see Table XIX, page 221. 



Cost per White High School Pupil 



123 



TABLE 90 



Cost Per Pupil in Last Four Years of White High Schools for the Main 
Subdivisions of Expenditures, Exclusive of General Control, from 
August 1, 1942 to June 30, 1943 



fnTTMTV 


Salaries 


Textbooks 
and Other 

Costs of 
Instruction 


Operation 


Main- 
tenance 


Auxiliary 
Agencies 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


Capital 
Outlay 


County Average: 






























1942 


$70 


63 


$5 


64 


$7 


58 


$3 


58 


$10 


43 


$97 


86 


$9 


64 


1943 


75 


91 


5 


23 


7 


78 


2 


87 


10 


78 


102 


57 


4 


32 


Allegany 


69 


47 


6 


16 


9 


01 


3 


47 


8 


70 


96 


81 


3 


07 


Anne Arundel . . . 


70 


87 


4 


02 


6 


46 


1 


79 


13 


72 


96 


86 




02 




67 


65 


3 


69 


5 


12 


1 


28 


4 


94 


82 


68 




54 




74 


94 


4 


41 


5 


69 


4 


31 


44 


48 


133 


83 


20 


38 




76 


83 


3 


54 


10 


10 


4 


63 


14 


93 


110 


03 




12 


Carroll 


80 


59 


5 


87 


7 


17 


2 


66 


*18 


19 


114 


48 




22 


Cecil 


79 


27 


6 


14 


9 


21 


1 


01 


9 


81 


105 


44 


4 


20 




t85 


68 


3 


13 


f20 


67 


t4 


59 


29 


10 


143 


17 


4 


00 


Dorchester 


78 


53 


5 


13 


10 


36 


5 


28 


17 


64 


116 


94 








70 


55 


5 


61 


6 


22 


1 


73 


J13 


07 


97 


18 


i 


si 




64 


20 


4 


25 


5 


59 


6 


81 


28 


42 


109 


27 




42 


Harford 


78 


16 


4 


53 


7 


45 


3 


84 




52 


94 


50 




47 




77 


49 


5 


32 


8 


76 


4 


05 


21 


25 


116 


87 


2 


06 


Kent 


76 


74 


4 


67 


5 


81 


2 


61 


15 


48 


105 


31 






Montgomery .... 


99 


76 


7 


87 


11 


04 


2 


55 


1 


15 


122 


37 


8 


12 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's. . . 


72 


91 


7 


58 


7 


85 


5 


11 


4 


62 


98 


07 


25 


51 


94 


57 


4 


27 


15 


50 


3 


64 


25 


79 


143 


77 




07 


St. Mary's 


66 


83 


6 


73 


6 


96 


1 


28 


33 


42 


115 


22 




86 




81 


32 


2 


77 


10 


48 


3 


45 


18 


81 


116 


83 


11 


76 


Talbot 


80 


53 


5 


41 


7 


06 


2 


59 


16 


12 


111 


71 




21 


Washington 


83 


96 


4 


45 


5 


99 


1 


57 


7 


15 


103 


12 




33 




74 


97 


3 


90 


6 


92 


1 


93 


14 


44 


102 


16 


2 


29 




72 


91 


3 


87 


8 


64 


3 


83 


20 


00 


109 


25 






Baltimore City. . 


103 


92 


6 


06 


13 


89 


2 


27 


2 


22 


128 


36 




27 


Junior High. . 


87 


50 


4 


51 


11 


82 


1 


91 


1 


42 


107 


16 




11 


Senior High. . . 


121 


51 


7 


13 


15 


60 


2 


37 


3 


19 


149 


80 




30 


Vocational .... 


146 


06 


14 


12 


22 


55 


5 


16 


3 


49 


191 


38 


1 


60 


Total State § 


$86 


40 


$5 


66 


$9 


57 


$2 


76 


$9 


04 


$113 


43 


$3 


40 



* Includes 2 cents for payment by Frederick County for transporting 14 pupils to a Carroll County 
high school. 

t Includes expenditures of Federal Government at Indian Head. 

% Includes 44 cents for payment by Washington County for transporting 24 pupib to a Frederick 
County high school. 

§ Total State includes onlv senior high schools of Baltimore City. 
For basic data by county, see Table XIX, page 221. 



124 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



5 



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« ^^^rHir5«o5^t>int>rHuoeooo^^M^^ajooS 

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*39,531 

4,013 
2,695 
6,478 
255 
836 
1,809 
1,300 
619 
967 
2,393 
1,221 
1,627 
771 
513 
3,220 
4,081 
502 
457 
662 
625 
2,581 
1,258 
801 




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*24,760 

2,649 
1,142 
2,957 
175 
710 
1,240 
925 
404 
832 
1,932 
767 
1,103 
470 
504 
1,421 
1,680 
477 
212 
712 
691 
2,060 
1,093 
730 




1 

rH 


♦17,453 

1,892 
660 

1,842 
175 
601 

1,047 
614 
175 
659 

1,465 
527 
837 
335 
342 
848 
925 
418 
113 
581 
511 

1,397 
946 
647 




I 


*9,333 

1,093 
326 
954 

34i 
571 
329 

342 
899 
298 
417 
155 
203 
305 
421 
264 

297 
287 
753 
577 
497 


County 


Total 

Anne Arundel 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Garrett 

Harford 

Montgomery 

Prince George's. . . 

Talbot 

Washington 

Worcester. 



Enrollment, Teachers, Salaries in County White High 125 
Schools; Cost per Colored Elementary School Pupil 



CHART 25 



COST PER COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PUPIL BELONGING 
FOR CURRENT EXPENSES EXCLUDING GENERAL CONTROL 



County 


1941 


1942 


County Average 


f 40 


$ 46 


Allegany 


oy 


to 


Carroll 




2£ 


Montgomery 


55 




Queen Anne's 


to 


62 


M a Oil x ngr* Oil 


51 


57 


Caroline 


it *> 




Cecil 


53 


59 


Wicomico 


04 


to 


tiarrora 


CO 


*o 


Frederick 


42 


47 


St. ilary's 


40 


48 


Dorchester 


34 


46 


Anne Arundel* 


45 


47 


Prince George's* 


43 


46 


Kent 


40 


50 


Charles 


33 


41 


Bait imore 


46 


45 


Somerset 


28 


38 


Talbot 


42 


46 


Hovrard 


32 


38 


Worcester 


30 


39 


Calvert 


29 


34 


Baltimore Cityt 


60 


63 


State 


51 


55 




* Excludes pupils attending elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College, 
f Data for elementary schools only. Excludes corresponding figures for junior high 
schools: $90 in 1943, $88 in 1942 and $S0 in 1941. 

County average for 1943 includes estimated expenditures of $1.72 per pupil hy State 
and County Departments of Health for nine months from October 1, 1942 to June 30, 1943. 
For basic data by county, see Table XXI, page 224. 



126 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

CHART 26 



COST PEE COLORED HIGH SCHOOL PUPIL BELONGING 
FOR CURRENT EXPENSES EXCLUDING GENERAL CONTROL 



County 
Co. Av. 

All. 

Wash. 

Calv. 

P. Geo. 

Caro. 

Carr. 

St. M. 

How. 

Cec. 

Fred. 

Kent 

A. A. 

Q. A. 

Talb. 

Balto. 

Chas. 

Wic. 

Mont. 

Harf. 

Dor. 

Som. 

Wor. 

Balto. City* 
State 



1941 1942 1943 



$68 * 7 



118 




♦Tuition payment of $150 for 25 Baltimore County pupils attending Baltimore City 
senior high schools is included in Baltimore County, Baltimore City and State figures, but 
is not included in county average. 

f Data for senior high schools only. Excludes corresponding figures for junior high 
schools: $90 in 1943, $88 in 1942 and $80 in 1941; and for vocational schools: $207 in 1943, 
$181 in 1942 and $187 in 1941. 

For basic data by county, see Table XXII, page 225. 



Cost per Colored 
and S 



High School Pupil; Enrollment, Teachers 127 
in County Colored High Schools 



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128 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 93 



Federal Vocational Funds Allotted to and Expended in Maryland, 1942-43 



Purpose 


1943 
Allotment 


1943 
Expenditures * 


Unexpended 
Balance 




$69,133.88 
104,193.24 
49,673.98 
25,470.86 
15,668.77 


$57,160.86 
104,193.24 
49,226.70 
20,012.85 
10,601.85 


$11,973.02 | 


Education for Distributive Occupations. .. . 

Total 


447.28 
5,458.01 
5,066.92 


$264,140.73 


$241,195.50 


$22,945.23 



* See notes for Table 94 and Table 99, page 132, for explanation of differences. 



TABLE 94 

Federal Vocational Funds Expended by Subject and Type of School, 1942-13 



Type of School 


Subject 


Total 


Agriculture 


Home 
Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Distributive 
Education 


County Day 

White 

Colored 


$41,685.45 
13,792.41 

49.50 
396.00 


$35,215.69 
8,011.53 

2,700.23 
630 . 00 


$35,046.43 
5,250.00 

1,893.75 


$5,696.67 


$117,644.24 
27,053.94 

4,643.48 
1,026.00 

1,909.79 
2,549.00 

38,732.83 

25,621.69 


County Evening 

White 




Colored 




University of Maryland 
Mining 


1,909.79 
2,549.00 

33,882.83 

23,173.94 




Volunteer Firemen . 
Baltimore City 

Day 

Evening and Part- 
time 

Total 








900.00 


2,331.25 


3,950.00 
116.50 


a$56,823.36 


b$48,888.70 


c$103,705.74 


d$9,763.17 


$219,180.97 



a $337.50 included for agriculture in Table 93 is shown in Table 99. 

b $338.00 included for home economics in Table 93 is shown in Table 99. 

c $487.50 included for trade and industry in Table 93 is shown in Table 99. 

d $838.68 included for distributive occupations in Table 93 is shown in Table 99. 



Federal Vocational Fund, Total Allotments; Expenditures, 129 
Total and in County Day White High Schools 



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130 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 96 



Federal Aid for Vocational Education in Maryland County Day High Schools for 
Colored Pupils, Year Ending June 30, 1943 



Year and 
County 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Total 
Federal 
Aid for 
Regular 
Salaries 


En- 
roll- 
ment 


Federal Aid for 


En- 
roll- 
ment 


Federal Aid for 


Salaries 


Travel 


Regular 
Salaries 


Sum 
Salaries 


mer 
Travel 


En- 
roll- 
ment 


Fed- 
eral 
Aid 


Total Counties: 






























1939-40 


925 


$9,792 


00 


$1,119 


00 


1,116 


$6,879 


00 








194 


$3 ,.025 


$19,696.00 


1940-41 


935 


9,077 


64 


885 


97 


1,156 


5,891 


00 


$i64 


$10 


00 


194 


5,150 


20,118.64 


1941-42 


870 


12,373 


30 


1,845 


11 


1,091 


5,256 


71 


115 


10 


00 


160 


5,206 


22,836.01 


1942-43 


931 


12,098 


67 


1,693 


74 


1,389 


7,056 


75 


873 


81 


78 


147 


5,250 


25,278.42 


Allegany 












39 


348 


75 








15 


800 


1,148.75 


Anne Arundel . . . 


' 35 


466 


67 


65 


74 


121 


693 


00 








93 


3,250 


4,409.67 


Calvert 


41 


900 


00 


53 


27 


91 


312 


50 


'i20 


7 


18 






1,332.50 




84 


720 


00 


188 


77 


86 


300 


00 


208 


21 


50 






1,228.00 


Carroll 


49 


537 


20 


44 


90 


















" 537.20 


Charles '. 


134 


1,694 


00 


208 


04 


'230 


650 


00 












2,344.00 


Dorchester 


97 


480 


00 


239 


60 


67 


150 


00 










1^200 


1,830.00 


Frederick 


53 


375 


00 


20 


59 


70 


297 


50 












" 672.50 














83 


1,250 


00 


i?5 










1,375.00 


Howard 


"54 


646 


80 


11 


93 


51 


537 


50 












1,184.30 


Kent 


60 


864 


00 


117 


34 


73 


30Q 


00 












1,164.00 


Montgomery. . . . 


76 


900 


00 


13 


63 


83 


468 


00 












1,368.00 


Prince George's . 


65 


600 


00 






92 


297 


50 












897.50 


Queen Anne's. . . 












76 


300 


00 












300.00 


St. Mary's 


' '70 


1,656 


66 


269 


66 


101 


600 


00 


'i20 


20 


33 






2,376.00 


Talbot 


26 


675 


60 


180 


06 


72 


252 


00 


120 


25 


83 






1,047.00 




44 


864 


00 


132 


67 


















864.00 


Worcester 


43 


720 


00 


148 


20 


"54 


300 


66 


- 180 


6 


94 






1,200.00 



Federal Vocational Fund Expenditures in Colored Day High 131 
Schools; Expenditures by Source of Funds for County Adult 

Education 



TABLE 97— Expenditures for Adult Education in Maryland Counties, 1942-3 



County 


Salary Expenditures 


Percent of 
Salary Expenditures 
from 


Expenditures 

for Other 
than Salaries 


Receipts 
from 
Fees 


Total 


Federal 


State 


County 


Federal 
Funds 


State 
Funds 


County 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


County 
Funds 


Grand Total 


$18,128.75 


$5,633.25 


$12,378.50 


$117 


31 


68 


1 


$36.23 


$2,792.97 


$3,067.51 



White Adults 



Total Counties . . 


$16,493 


75 


$4,553.25 


$11,823 


.50 


$117 


28 


71 


1 


$36.23 


$2,590 


97 


$2,974.16 


Allegany 


a2,866 


. 50 


1,374.00 


al,492 


50 




48 


52 




36.23 


367 


62 


729.00 


Anne Arundel . . . 


b282 


50 


b282 


50 






100 






43 


50 






1,368 


00 




1,368 


00 






100 






118 


20 


377! 50 


Carroll 


693 


00 


247! 50 


445 


50 




36 


64 






76 


00 


76.00 


Cecil 


540 


00 




432 


00 


cl08 




80 


b20 




96 


00 


310.66 


Charles 


351 


00 




351 


00 






100 














481 


50 


9! 66 


472 


50 




'2 


98 






208 


00 




Garrett 


697 


50 


108.00 


589 


50 




15 


85 












Harford 


789 


00 


49.50 


739 


50 




6 


93 






330 


00 


336! 66 




108 


00 




108 


00 






100 












Kent 


76 


50 




76 


50 






100 












Montgomery .... 


3,321 


00 


l,25i!66 


2,061 


00 


9 


38 


62 






655 


66 


539! 66 


Prince George's . 


2,932 


50 


1,012.50 


1,920 


00 




35 


65 






382 


15 


354.00 


Queen Anne's. . . 


283 


50 




283 


50 






100 






31 


50 




Somerset. 


d261 


oo 




d261 


00 






100 












Talbot 


108 


00 




108 


00 






100 














753 


75 


50i!75 


252 


00 




67 


33 














108 


00 




108 


00 






100 






60 


00 


35!66 




472 


50 




472 


50 






100 






223 


00 


223.00 



Colored Adults 



Total Counties.. 


$1,635.00 


$1,080 


00 


$555.00 




66 


34 






$202.00 


$93.35 


Allegany 


231.00 


211 


50 


19.50 




92 


8 








40.50 


Anne Arundel . . . 


216.00 


112 


50 


103.50 




52 


48 






75:66 




Charles 


180.00 


180 


00 






100 












36.00 


36 


00 






100 








13166 




Harford 


94.50 






94! 50 






100 










Montgomery .... 


216.00 


54 


00 


162.00 




25 


75 






66! 66 


36! 50 


Somerset 


90.00 






90.00 






100 
6 








Talbot 


459.00 


432 


00 


27.00 




94 










Washington 


27.00 






27.00 






100 










Wicomico 


54.00 


54 


00 






100 








48! 66 


l6!35 


Worcester 


31.50 






3ii50 






100 







* Exclusive of federal program for vocational training for war production for which see Table 81, page 108. 
a Excludes overpayment of $1,783.50 returned to State. 

b Includes $170 paid toward day work in distributive education at Annapolis High School, 
c Paid by students. d Excludes overpayment of $10 returned to State. 



132 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 98 

Federal Aid for Vocational Education in Baltimore City Schools for School 
Year Ending June 30, 1943 







Enrollment 


Amount of 




Total 






Federal 


Type of School 


Federal 






Aid per 




Funds 






Pupil 






Male 


Female 


Enrolled 


Day Vocational — Industrial 


$33,882.83 






$25.25 


White 


929 


i37 


Colored 




171 


105 




Day Vocational — Agriculture — Colored 


900.00 


5 


180 ! 66 


Part-time Trade Extension and Preparatory. . . . 


23,173.94 






17.83 


White 




'954 
69 


*i87 




Colored 




90 




Part-time Distributive Occupational Classes .... 


116.50 




48 


2A3 


Cooperative Part-time Distributive Classes 


*3,950.00 


' 17 


128 


27.24 




2,331.25 






3.70 


White 






'279 




Colored 






352 












Total 


$64,354.52 


2,145 


1,326 


$18.54 



* Includes $1,500 for supervision. 



TABLE 99 

Expenditures for Administration, Supervision and Teacher Training 
in Vocational Education, Year Ending June 30, 1943 



Purpose 


Administration 
and Supervision 


Teacher Training 


Total 


State 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


University 
of 

Maryland 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


State 
and 
University 
Funds 


Federal 
Funds 


Agriculture 

Home Economics .... 
Trade and Industry . . 
Occupational Infor- 
mation and Guidance 

Total 


$1,538.12 
4,873.46 
4,840.84 

1,447.58 


$680.60 
1,818.33 
*2,372.54 

U, 789. 78 


$3,039.69 
2,639.21 
9,674.39 


$3,039.69 
2,639.19 
9,674.40 


$4,577.81 
7,512.67 
14,515.23 

1,447.58 


$3,720.29 
4,457.52 
*12,046.94 

tl,789.78 


$12,700.00 


*t$6,661.25 


$15,353.29 


$15,353.28 


$28,053.29 


*t$22,014.53 



* Includes $1,163 toward cost of administration of the vocational education program shown in 
Table 93 as agriculture $337.50, home economics $338.00, trade and industry $487.50. 

t Includes $838.68 included in Table 93 as distributive occupations. 
*t The sum of $1,163 and $838.68 or $2,001.68 explains the excess of the total for administration, 
supervision and teacher training over the amount showa for teacher training in Table 93. 



Federal Expenditures in Balto. City and for Supervision; 133 
Pupil Transportation Data 



TABLE 100 

Maryland County Expenditures for Transporting Pupils to School 1910-1943 











Cost to 




Public 


Number of 


Number of 


Public per 


YEAR 


Expenditures for 


Counties 


Pupils 


Pupil 




Transportation 




Transported 


Transported 




$5,^10 


4 








17 , <s70 


1 r\ 

10 






1920 


64,734 


18 








lou , oy i 


on 


A OA A 


• 

$30 . 59 




188, 516 


21 


6 ,499 


29.01 




9/19 A/t 1 


go 


O , Dlo 


9Q no 

<2o . uy 


1926 


312,495 


22 


10,567 


29.57 


1927 , 


373,168 


23 


U3,385 


§27.92 




4ob , ooo 


23 


fl5 , 907 


§27.49 


1 G9Q 


*K19 QfiK 

^01^ , ooo 


oo 

M) 


+1 a Qoa 
ylo , yZo 


§27 . 12 


1 QQH 


*fif>0 1 A fl 
^OUo , i.'lo 




, Oil 


S9<J fC1 

S^o . ol 


1931 


*744,400 


23 


t29,006 


§25.71 


1932 


*834,679 


23 


t35,019 


§23.88 


1 QQQ 


BOO ,6t1 


OQ 

c-o 


+Af\ ona 


§21 . 33 


1 QQA 


OOO , om 


9Q 


+/19 9/11 
J4£ , £41 


R9f> A H 


1935 


892,422 


23 


t44,576 


§20.04 


1936 


952,598 


23 


t49,051 


§19.48 


1937 


1,019,872 


23 


t52,248 


§19.55 


1938 


1,121,498 


23 


t56,268 


§19.96 


1939 


1,202,784 


23 


t61,753 


§19.50 


1940 


1,285,520 


23 


t66,036 


§19.50 


1941 


1,326,389 


23 


t70,162 


§18.94 


1942 


1,411,110 


23 


t74,113 


§19.07 


1943 


1,491,244 


23 


t74,711 


§19.98 



TABLE 101 

County Pupils Transported to Public Schools at Public Expense, 1923-1943 



YEAR 


Pupils Transported to School at Public Expense 


Public 
Expenditures for 
Transportation of 


Number Transported 


Percent Transported 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 


White 
Pupils 


Colored 
Pupils 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


1923 


3,485 


133 


843 





3 




6 





$129,738 


$2,853 


1924 


4,682 


133 


1,701 





5 




11 





185,263 


3,253 


1925 


6,269 


144 


2,197 


1 


6 




13 





238,094 


3,947 


1926 


7,613 


105 


2,835 


14 


8 




15 


2 


308,596 


3,899 


1927 


9,778 


tl40 


3,424 


15 


10 




17 


1 


368,089 


5,079 


1928 


11,774 


t201 


3,870 


20 


11 




18 


2 


431,065 


5,517 


1929 


14,028 


t247 


4,632 


*23 


14 




20 


2 


506,478 


*5,907 


1930 


16,670 


t310 


5,660 


*174 


16 




23 


9 


594,473 


*8,675 


1931 


20,593 


t493 


7,746 


*215 


20 


2 


29 


10 


726,747 


*17,653 


1932 . , 


24,787 


t724 


9,019 


*477 


23 


3 


32 


19 


807,373 


*27,305 


1933 . . . 


28,741 


t847 


10,157 


502 


27 


3 


34 


19 


828,067 


30,207 


1934 , . , 


29,969 


U.051 


10,581 


740 


28 


4 


35 


27 


826,817 


36,732 


1935 


31,147 


tl,096 


11,517 


1,035 


29 


4 


37 


35 


850,481 


41,938 


1936 


32,676 


tl,389 


13,191 


°1,795 


31 


6 


41 


51 


890,325 


°62,272 


1937 


34,076 


fl,807 


13,970 


°2,395 


32 


8 


42 


59 


944,922 


°74,951 


1938 


35,980 


t2,749 


14,556 


°2,983 


34 


12 


43 


68 


1,013,356 


°108,142 


1939 


38,201 


t4,147 


16,147 


°3,258 


36 


18 


45 


70 


1,066,880 


°135,904 


1940 


40,633 


t4,834 


17,122 


°3,447 


38 


21 


45 


71 


1,134,161 


°151,359 


1941 


42,765 


t5,472 


18,326 


°3,599 


40 


24 


47 


70 


1,160,242 


°166,146 


1942 


45,055 


t6,650 


18,893 


°3,515 


42 


29 


48 


69 


1,223,726 


°187,384 


1943 


45,733 


t6,591 


18,804 


°3 , 583 


42 


29 


49 


69 


1,288,998 


°202,246 


Increase 






















1923-43. . 


42,248 


6,458 


17,961 


3,583 


39 


28 


43 


69 


$1,159,260 


$199,393 



t Includes county pupils transported to elementary school at Bowie Normal School or State 
Teachers College at expense of State. 

* Includes Rosenwald aid toward transportation of pupils. 

Includes Baltimore County pupils toward whose transportation costs to Baltimore City high 
schools Baltimore County contributed. In 1943 there were 25 pupils and the cost to the county 
was $340.90. 

§ Pupils transported at State expense to Bowie Normal School or Teachers College excluded 
in obtaining cost per pupil transported. 



134 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 102 

Maryland County Pupils Transported to School in 1942-43 at Public Expense 



County 


Pupils Transported 


Public Expense for Transportation 


Total 


To Ele- 
mentary 
School 


To 
High 
School 


Total 


To Ele- 
mentary 
School 


To 
High 
School 


Total Counties 


°t74,711 


152,324 


°22,387 


°§$1,491,244 


§$1,041,158 


°§$450,086 




°10,587 


7,321 


°3,266 


°§142,284 


113,933 


°§28,351 




*4,670 


3,320 


*1,350 


112,528 


79,722 


32,806 




t6,077 


t3,919 


2,158 


110,256 


68,651 


41,605 


Allegany 


5,064 


3,750 


1,314 


104,448 


73 , 552 


30,896 


Carroll 


J4.337 


J3,113 


tl,224 


93,830 


62,348 


31,482 




2,354 


1,466 


888 


85,153 


54,954 


30,199 




6,640 


5,273 


1,367 


§79,461 


72,823 


§6,638 




3,839 


2,874 


965 


66,794 


50,720 


16,074 


Prince George's 


t4,869 


3,231 


1,638 


62,739 


40,012 


22,727 




2,252 


1,391 


861 


59,993 


37,755 


22,238 


Charles 


2,378 


1,598 


780 


58,941 


36,026 


22,915 




2,028 


1,346 


682 


58,084 


38,583 


19,501 




2,196 


1,485 


711 


50,614 


32.439 


18,175 




2,488 


1,743 


745 


50,078 


33,383 


16,695 


Cecil 


2,236 


1,485 


751 


45,143 


30,934 


14,209 




2,010 


1,366 


644 


44,267 


30,084 


14,183 


St. Mary's 


1,677 


1,083 


594 


44,186 


28,566 


15,620 




1,961 


1,361 


600 


43 , 564 


28,955 


14,609 




1,226 


862 


364 


37,772 


21,862 


15,910 




1,370 


901 


469 


37,757 


24,392 


13,365 


Talbot 


1,579 


1,072 


507 


37,081 


25,215 


11,866 


Harford 


1,678 


1,564 


114 


§35,392 


§35,238 


§154 


Kent 


1,195 


800 


395 


30,879 


21,011 


9,868 



t Includes 98 pupils, 26 from Anne Arundel and 72 from Prince George's transported to the 
elementary school at Bowie Teachers College. 

Includes 25 pupils toward whose transportation costs to Baltimore City high schools, Baltimore 
County contributed $340.90. 

* Includes 24 Washington County pupils attending a Frederick County high school. 

t Includes 56 elementary and 14 high school Frederick County pupils attending Carroll County 
schools. 

§ Supplemented by payments of high school pupils in Baltimore, Harford and Montgomery 
Counties and elementary pupils in Harford County. 



Pupils Transported, Expenditures and Cost per Pupil Transported 135 



TABLE 103 

Cost Per Maryland County Pupil Transported to School at Public Expense 
for Year Ending June 30, 1943 



Average Cost to Public Per County Pupil Transported to 



County 




White 


Colored 




All 












County 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 




Schools 


Schools 


Schools 


Schools 


Schools 


County Average. . 


$19.98 


$20.02 


$19.87 


$19.34 


$21.34 


Garrett 


36.17 


37.49 


34.01 








30.81 


29.29 


43.74 


13! 46 


43.' 6 5 




28.64 


32.14 


32.44 


22.76 


19.39 


Queen Anne's.. . . 


27.56 


25.35 


30.48 


34.38 


21.70 




26.64 


29.37 


29.12 


21.27 


19.70 




26.35 


30.60 


31.27 


18.31 


13.58 




25.84 


26.96 


24.61 


24.64 


26.02 




24.79 


24.97 


36.48 


17.66 


20.52 


Frederick 


T24.10 


23.98 


t23.60 


24.50 


31.39 


Talbot 


23.49 


28.74 


26.60 


15.48 


16.78 




23.05 


27.18 


29.87 


13.37 


16.50 




22.22 


24.84 


29.74 


15.47 


15.80 


Caroline 


22.02 


22.02 


22.02 


22.02 


22.02 


Carroll 


J21.63 


J19.74 


125.88 


26.53 


23.18 




*21.09 


*22.73 


*1.35 


20.12 






20.63 


19.42 


23.30 


111.76 


63*.6i 


Cecil 


20.19 


20.24 


17.26 


26.61 


29.83 


Howard 


20.13 


19.56 


22.31 


16.25 


23.18 


Anne Arundel .... 


°18.19 


17.47 


17.27 


°24.07 


31.72 




17.40 


17.10 


16.37 


57.53 


56.56 




*§13.44 


15.56 


*8.58 ■ 


15.56 


*§11.56 


Prince George's. . 


13.08 


12.36 


11.78 


21.07 


22.45 




*11.97 


13.22 


*2.64 


17.70 


*11.81 



t Includes average cost of $40.63 for 24 Washington County pupils attending a Frederick County 
high school at a cost of $975 to Washington County. 

t Includes average cost of $18.57 for 56 elementary and 14 high school Frederick County pupils 
attending school in Carroll County at a cost of $1,300 to Frederick County. 

* Supplemented by payment of high school pupils in Baltimore, Harford and Montgomery 
Counties and elementary pupils in Harford County. 

Cost to Anne Arundel County for transporting 26 pupils to Bowie State Teachers College Dem- 
onstration School is excluded in computing average cost per pupil transported. 

§ Includes average cost of $13.64 per Baltimore County pupil transported to "aigh schools in 
Baltimore City. 



136 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 104 



Number and Percent of Maryland County Pupils Transported to School at 
Public Expense, Year Ending June 30, 1943 



COUNTY 


Whtte 


Colored 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Total and Average 


















1941 


42,765 


40.4 


18,326 


46.7 


5,472 


23.6 


3,599 


70.0 


1942 


45,055 


42.1 


18,893 


48.1 


6,650 


29.0 


3,515 


69.4 


1943 


45,733 


42.0 


18,804 


49.0 


*6,591 


29.3 


t3,583 


69.0 


St. Mary's 


711 


71.9 


427 


98.6 


372 


52.7 


167 


97.7 


Howard 


1,528 


69.5 


658 


89.4 


215 


37.7 


87 


82.9 




2,983 


69.7 


1,150 


64.9 


130 


50.4 


74 


74.7 




1,000 


64.1 


502 


61.7 


366 


66.2 


142 


83.5 


Charles 


1,068 


65.6 


433 


73.4 


530 


39.2 


347 


94.6 


Queen Anne's 


729 


61.5 


363 


74.8 


172 


35.0 


106 


86.2 




911 


59.4 


482 


62.5 


574 


52.3 


229 


72.2 




843 


57.2 


368 


57.9 


518 


45.9 


232 


74.4 


Calvert 


648 


82.3 


235 


94.8 


214 


19.8 


129 


97.7 




650 


47.8 


342 


55.9 


422 


56.1 


165 


78.6 


Kent 


561 


53.8 


292 


59.6 


239 


40.6 


103 


77.4 


Garrett 


1,466 


44.9 


888 


75.1 










Frederick 


3,102 


51.0 


1,228 


52.2 


2i8 


32.6 


122 


63l5 




3,823 


57.1 


1,858 


72.2 


*96 


2.4 


300 


52.2 


Cecil 


1,348 


43.9 


652 


52.4 


137 


38.9 


99 


75.0 




847 


39.8 


481 


51.2 


499 


47.3 


201 


58.1 




1,008 


36.5 


560 


45.5 


383 


35.4 


301 


70.5 




4,580 


40.6 


1,037 


33.7 


693 


43.2 


330 


87.5 




6,855 


37.8 


3,153 


50.1 


466 


24.6 


tll3 


34.0 


Allegany 


3,742 


34.7 


1,307 


33.2 


8 


4.4 


7 


11.1 


Washington 


2,835 


28.4 


958 


37.5 


39 


17.3 


7 


14.9 


Prince George's 


3,049 


24.9 


1,316 


34.0 


*182 


3.8 


322 


85.4 


Harford 


1,446 


33.1 


114 


7.4 


118 


16.4 







* Includes 26 pupils from Anne Arundel and 72 pupils from Prince George's transported to ele- 
mentary school at Bowie State Teachers College at State expense. 

t Includes 25 pupils transported to Baltimore City senior high schools at expense of Baltimore 
County. 



Number and Percent of Pupils Transported; Schools to 137 
Which Transported 



TABLE 105 



Number of County Schools to Which Transportation Was Provided at Public 
Expense, Year Ending* June 30, 1943 





Schools for 


White Pupils 




















Schools 

for 
Colored 


Total 


County 


With Elementary Grades 
Only 


w nn 
•n.ign 
and 


w icn 

TJ • U 

Mign 


Number 
of 

Different 










Ele- 


bcnool 


Pupils 


Schools 




One- 
Teacher 


Two- 
Teacher 


Graded 


mentary 
Grades 


Only 








35 


70 


183 


94 


49 


155 


586 






2 


16 


6 


4 


1 


29 






3 


20 


2 


4 


4 


33 






4 


21 


8 


3 


11 


47 


Calvert 




3 


3 




1 


3 


10 


Caroline 




3 


1 


"b 




4 


13 


Carroll 




4 


5 


9 




5 


23 


Cecil 


2 


3 


4 


4 


'4 


4 


21 


Charles 






1 


5 




9 


15 




6 


3 


5 


5 


'i 


12 


32 






4 


14 


5 


2 


7 


32 




16 


6 


5 


4 


l 




32 




1 




3 


a8 




*7 


19 








4 


3 


i 


4 


12 


Kent 




6 


1 


3 


l 


8 


19 


Montgomery 


i 


4 


20 


5 


7 


15 


52 






1 


17 


4 


5 


8 


35 


Queen Anne's 


3 


4 


6 




5 


9 


27 


St. Mary's 


3 


8 


2 




2 


9 


24 


Somerset 


1 


1 


4 


*2 


2 


8 


18 


Talbot 


1 


2 


3 


2 


2 


10 


20 


Washington 




4 


19 


5 


3 


1 


32 




i 


2 


5 


5 


1 


7 


21 


Worcester 




3 


4 


4 




9 


20 








4 






1 


5 


Entire State 


. . 35 


70 


187 


94 


49 


156 


591 







a Six of these to elementary only. 



138 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 106 

Capital Outlay from August 1, 1942 to June 30, 1943 



County 



Total Counties. 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick.. .. . . 

Garrett. . . 

Harford. 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Baltimore City . 
Elementary . . 
Junior High. 
Senior High . . 
Vocational . . . 

Total State 



White Elementary 



One- 
Teacher 
Schools 



$9.88 



9.88 



$9.88 



Two- 
Teacher 
Schools 



$8,510.77 



1,256.73 



82.53 



9, 



6,467.06 



149.53 



545.04 



$8,510.77 



Graded 
Schools 



$592,082.97 

15,749.50 
58,559.86 
181,500.10 
94.73 
18.92 



89.38 
3,516.82 



2,239.66 
1,582.64 
276.04 
1,090.96 



65,269.18 
184.996.03 



962.11 



1,039.94 
7,531.62 
61,705.70 
5,859.78 

7,440.53 
7,440.53 



$599,523.50 



All 

Elementary 
Schools 



$600,603.62 

15,749.50 
58,559.86 
181,500.10 
1,351.46 
18.92 



89.38 
3,516.82 



2,322.19 
1,582.64 
276.04 
1,110.72 



71,736.24 
184,996.03 



1,111.64 



1,039.94 
7,531.62 
62,250.74 
5,859.78 

7,440.53 
7,440.53 



$608,044.15 



White 
High 
Schools 



$174,255.07 

10,992.56 
746.79 
3,148.25 
4,768.82 
89.64 
363.35 
490.26 
2,228.29 

3,629.i5 
473.21 
684.31 

1,457.77 



41,415.42 
92,853.48 
33.36 
351.43 
6,960.78 
125.00 
763.03 
2,680.17 



8,830.00 



1,789.27 
4,516.83 
2,523.90 

$183,085.07 



Colored 
Schools 



$37,974.48 

25.63 
1,326.22 
805.33 



13.91 



11.10 
449.82 



148.59 



50.81 
351.09 



202.80 
19,348.55 
169.72 



14,762.45 
66.50 
20.95 
221.01 



1,718.46 
508.56 
184.00 
557.48 
468.42 

$39,692.94 



a Includes $376.00 for administration building and $12,719.80 from Federal Works Agency. 

b Includes $95,075.00 from Federal Works Agency. 

c Includes $247.70 for administration building. 

d Includes $4,573.71 from Federal Works Agency. 

e Includes $18,023.02 for administration building. 

f Includes $91,953.53 from Federal Works Agency. 

g Includes $1,317.44 for administration building. 

h Includes $204,322.04 from Federal Works Agency. 

For basic data by county, see Tables XVII to XIX, XXI and XXII, pages 219-221, 224 and 225. 



Capital Outlay; School Bonds Outstanding 



139 



TABLE 107 



School Bonds Outstanding as of June 30, 1943 







1943 Assessable 




Percent that 






Basis Taxable 


Assessable Basis 


Indebtedness 


County 


School Bonds 


at Full Rate 


Back of Each 


for School Bonds 




Outstanding 


for County 


Dollar of School 


is of Total 




June 30, 1943 


Purposes 


Indebtedness 


County Basis 




$18,0^4, 9oo 


0*1 A f\ 4 OAJ (700 

$1,404,304,738 


$78 


1.3 




3,262,000 


96,579,172 


30 


3.4 


Anne Arundel 


al, 126, 861 


64,927,309 


58 


1.7 




2,586,667 


359,141,097 


139 


.7 


Calvert 


D50.500 


7,433,392 


147 


.7 




118,000 


15,979,709 


136 


.7 


Carroll 




43,349,690 


00 


.0 
.6 


Cecil 


285,000 


51,588,926 


181 




101,000 


12,804,803 


127 


.8 




439,280 


25,373,205 


58 


1.7 




1,021,100 


72,152,955 


71 


1.4 






19,319,212 


00 


.0 




213,150 


65,589,413 


307 


.3 




314,250 


20,822,195 


66 


1.5 


Kent 




18,252,960 


00 


.0 


Montgomery 


4,348,980 


178,407,380 


41 


2.4 




cl, 704, 178 


127,431,111 


75 


1.3 




dl80,000 


18,837,592 


96 


1.0 




e 


10,122,472 


00 


.0 




53,500 


12,673,840 


237 


.4 


Talbot 


152,000 


23,368,345 


154 


.7 


Washington 


1,103,500 


100,669,784 


91 


1.1 


Wicomico 


f791,000 


36,751,105 


46 


2.2 




174,000 


22,729,071 


131 


.8 


Baltimore City 


gl4,480,923 


1,416,728,828 


98 


1.0 


Entire State 


$32,505,889 


$2,821,033,566 


$87 


1.2 



a $94,138.67 sinking fund balance has been deducted. 

b Excludes $100,000 authorized but unissued. 

c $256,661 sinking fund balance has been deducted. 

d Excludes $30,000 authorized but unissued. 

e Excludes $3,000 of short term indebtedness. 

f Excludes $280,000 authorized but unissued. 

X $1,383,998.72 sinking fund balance has been deducted. 



140 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 108 

School Debt* and Interest Paymentsf Per Pupil Belonging, 1943 



County 



County Average 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert , 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 



School 
Debt Per 

Pupil 
Belonging 



$105.76 

225.03 
90.47 

100.06 
23.16 
39.36 
0.00 
60.90 
26.48 
99.93 

112.05 
0.00 
31.74 



Interest 
Payments 
Per Pupil 
Belonging 



$3.90 

7.79 
2.43 
3.40 



09 
49 
00 
67 
20 
16 
46 
0.00 
.63 



County 



Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Baltimore City. 

Total State 



School 
Debt Per 

Pupil 
Belonging 



Interest 
Payments 
Per Pupil 
Belonging 



$88.09 


$3 


09 


0.00 





00 


272.47 


10 


53 


89.39 


4 


55 


78.98 


1 


62 


0.00 





00 


15.52 




50 


52.82 


2 


22 


88.38 


3 


55 


147.54 


4 


75 


47.66 


2 


26 


135.29 


5 


69 


$117.15 


$4 


59 



* See Table 107, page 139 for school bonds outstanding. 

t See Table XVII, page 219 for interest payments on bonded indebtedness. 



TABLE 109 
Value of School Property, 1922-1943 



YEAR 



Value of School Property 



Maryland 



Counties 



Baltimore 
Cityf 



Value Per Pupil Enrolled 



Maryland 



Counties 



Baltimore 
Cityf 



1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 



$20 
22 
28 
33 
38 
48 
51 
52 
55 
61 
64 
66 
72 
74 
74 
*78 
*81 
*82 
*86 
*87 
*88 
*89 



453,646 
,236,638 
264,507 
622,503 
865,024 
654,045 
765,517 
801,013 
741,316 
141,759 
116,448 
030,676 
241,647 
116,872 
429,453 
573,662 
336,202 
477,467 
373,506 
253,746 
171,154 
853,989 



$10,014,638 
11,796,630 
12,813,396 
14,946,810 
16,704,564 
17,889,796 
18,994,670 
19,920,102 
21,483,720 
23,830,725 
24,608,923 
25,350,740 
25,501,303 
26,847,518 
26,778,790 
*29,656,237 
*3 1,702, 972 
♦32,801,326 
*36,605,396 
*37,426,526 
*38,442,796 
*39,390,295 



$10,439,008 
10,440,008 
15,451,111 
18,675,693 
22,160,460 
30,764,249 
32,770.847 
32,880.911 
34,257,596 
37,311,034 
39,507,525 
40,679,936 
46,740,344 
47,269,354 
47,650,663 
48,917,425 
49,633,230 
49,676,141 
49,768,110 
49,827,220 
49,728,358 
50,463,694 



$82 
87 
110 
129 
148 
182 
191 
193 
201 
217 
222 
225 
246 
251 
250 
*264 
*277 
*278 
*291 
*292 
*296 
*300 



$68 
77 
85 
97 
108 
114 
120 
124 
132 
144 
146 
147 
149 
156 
155 
*171 
♦184 
*188 
*208 
*210 
*213 
*216 



$103 
100 
147 
164 
205 
277 
291 
290 
297 
321 
331 
335 
384 
384 
380 
395 
410 
408 
412 
414 
421 
430 



* Includes value of equipment in Maryland counties, but excludes value of administration 
buildings. 

t Excludes value of equipment, and also of administration buildings, warehouses, and storage 
buildings. 



School Debt and Interest Payments per Pupil; 
Value of School Property 



141 



TABLE 110 



Value of School Property, Including Equipment, Per Pupil Belonging, 1943 





School 


Property Used 


School 


Property Used 




by White Pupils 


by Colored Pupils 


County 


















Average 


Value 




Average 


Value 




Valuef 


Number 


Per 


Valuef 


Number 


Per 




Belonging 


White 


Belonging 


Colored 








Pupil 






Pupil 


- 

Total Counties J }nfq 


$36,343,173 


143,163 


$254 


$2,084,923 


26,919 


$77 


37,276,530 


143,807 


259 


2,113,765 


26,633 


79 




5,180,837 


14,258 


363 


85,218 


237 


360 




1,970,300 


9,088 


217 


°160,935 


3,368 


48 




4,694,600 


23,699 


198 


231,100 


2,151 


107 




124,500 


1,014 


123 


°50,725 


1,166 


44 




645,075 


2,303 


280 


73,000 


696 


105 




1,270,273 


5,900 


215 


21,500 


352 


61 


Cecil 


1,171,035 


4,212 


278 


40,050 


468 


86 




J344.100 


2,160 


159 


1118,000 


1,654 


71 




1,047,800 


3,015 


347 


5 106,450 


1,381 


77 




1,888,290 


8,266 


228 


111,560 


847 


132 




°536 , 840 


4,400 


122 










tl, 109,850 


5,855 


190 


63,150 


'86i 


73 




676,800 


2,909 


233 


23,750 


659 


36 


Kent 


78,597 


1,496 


525 


24,884 


711 


35 




6,163,400 


14,040 


439 


142,900 


1,921 


74 




f3, 441, 800 


15,832 


217 


310,400 


3,231 


96 




562,900 


1,652 


341 


°48,900 


627 


78 




168,125 


1,349 


125 


°27,625 


838 


33 




°501,100 


2,050 


244 


77,250 


1,398 


55 




520,083 


1,939 


268 


49,726 


938 


53 




2,890,600 


12,219 


237 


47,000 


267 


176 




1,780,425 


3,887 


458 


217,692 


1,475 


148 




509,200 


2,264 


225 


81,950 


1,387 


59 


Baltimore City 


*42,846,594 


76,652 


559 


*7, 617, 100 


30,387 


251 


Total State 


$80,123,124 


220,459 


$363 


$9,730,865 


57,020 


$171 



f No valuations are included for administration buildings, warehouses, or storage buildings. 
* Excludes value of equipment for Baltimore City. 
° Excludes value of rented buildings. 

$ Excludes value of property owned by the Federal government. 



142 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 111 
County Tax Levy 1943-1944 



County 



Total 
County 
Levy 



Levy for Public Schools 



Current 
Expenses 



Debt 
Service 



Capital 
Outlay 



Total 



Total Counties. . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel t- • 

Baltimore t 

Calvert. 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester f 

Frederick t 

Garrett t 

Harford 

Howard f 

Kent f 

Montgomery. 
Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington ")"•••• 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Baltimore City t- 

Entire State 



$19,261,566 

al, 741, 381 
bl, 772, 416 
c4, 240, 065 
109,065 
208,090 
477,922 
490,394 
140,899 
422,946 
889,342 
e331,993 
704,979 
374,135 
240,943 
fg3, 01 1,777 
1,376,180 
192,272 
hl35,903 
k233,013 
252,932 
1,096,580 
504,362 
k313,977 

m52,680,509 

$71,942,075 



dl 



$7,770,788 



818,149 
491,135 
,166,701 

41 , 572 

91,500 
254,215 
251,401 

82,121 
142,967 
421,000 
131,345 
330,000 
139,250_ 
100,000 
208,041 
763,876 

98,329 
h52,169 

83,675 
125,663 
628,810 
226.500 
122,369 



m9, 730, 006 
$17,500,794 



$1,631,545 

*253,165 
107,870 
276,384 
*10,708 
*1 1,860 



*23_,248 
*11,125 
*51,074 
*121,372 



26,266 
*28,825 



*g269 , 525 
♦182,500 
*4,900 



*13,275 
*19,810 
*122,995 
*70,235 
*26,408 

1,688,705 

$3,320,250 



$189,150 

20,948 
47,940 
12,000 
1,647 



16,500 
'3\_500 



2,200 
13,850 
1,500 
2,000 



45,785 
10,00.0 



,280 



5,000 
m25,200 
$214,350 



$9,591,483 



dl 



1,092,262 
646,945 
455,085 
53,927 
103,360 
270,715 
274,649 
96,746 
194,041 
544,572 
145,195 
357,766 
170,075 
100,000 
gl, 523, 351 
956,376 
103,229 
52,169 
103,230 
145,473 
751,805 
296,735 
153,777 

mil, 443, 911 

$21,035,394 



m41,236,598 
$50,906,681 



* Includes debt service paid directly by county commissioners, 
t For Calendar Year, 1944. 

a Excludes $7,920 due from State for care of insane and $57,200 due from State Roads Com- 
mission for bond retirement. 

b Excludes $30,000 due from State Roads Commission for share of lateral roads gasoline tax. 
c Excludes $365,000 estimated due from State of Maryland, 
d Includes $5,000 for Teachers' Retirement, 

e Excludes $6,000 from State hospital fund and $1,200 from State Forestry Department. 

f Excludes $69,220 derived from issue of refunding bonds for bond redemption for roads and 
other purposes, but includes $336,223 from general revenues and restricted receipts other than taxes. 

g Excludes $152,780 derived from issue of refunding bonds for bond redemption, but includes 
$4,500 from tax sale redemptions or liquor licenses or profits. 

h Includes $9,765 from sale of liquor licenses and $565 from tongers licenses. 

k Includes receipts from liquor control board, 
m Excludes State and Federal aid and loan funds. 



Levy in Local 



Units; Percent Levied for Schools 



143 



DO 

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C 
U 



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uQ > ca 3 



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N^00OHMt-OB>H00C<5TfiflfflNiOO^»^00t» 



i-( oseot-''»Hcoo5eo©oJt-owcg 

00 O 00 <0<0 (M t)< O OS O CO 03 00 



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I OS CO OS tJ< O C- T}< OS OS (M lO CO (M O CO IM t- Cg 00 LO 



r*. 



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WW 



lO MO"*iOOO00WTf NO»W -OO© 'lOomWOO 
OS rHrHOOiOSOO^CgtHC-iOcOCg -rHOO 'lOHCTjeOO 

<o rH oo co co oo 10 eg «o © io'oo t- oo -eoioos ■ m oo os eg ^ 



t-'iO0CHHHNWiONH(NCO -HO)* -i-Hi-icgC-CO 
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(M O US'rH Ht-0WO0OHfflafflWM003) 
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o o tj< i-H t> tj< oo m' 10 rH as co co <m in oo eg eg m -<f t> os 
mos-^iOrHos-^oeocgcgrHrHtocommoocos^oosio 

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u3oocoiHc>30inT^iOi-(cooococg^t>cgrHcgc>iTj<^ico 

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m o eg os © eg co'osjio eot>ocgcococgoegc- 
(ooscgososTj<Tj<o)c^'C0T}it- oo>c- o rH cooo to t- 
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144 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 113 

Assessable Basis Taxable at Full Rate for County Purposes 
in Thousands of Dollars 



(Data Furnished by State Tax Commission) 



- 

PrvTTMTV 


*1923 


*1928 


1938 


1940 


1 QA9 


1 QAQ 


* 1 ' ,-,f 1 (~* nnntina 


«cci 70c 
*pOO 1 , 1 ~o 


$000 , OUo 




0*1 I C7 OAQ 


+«1 Oil QCQ 

1*1 , oil , y Oi> 


+ 41 AC\A 


All 


Di7 , 00D 


80 71 K 


*83 160 


*Qfi 7fifi 
3D , <OD 


Qfi 917 


so , iy 


Anne Arundel 


30,692 


47,544 


♦55^750 


*58,812 


62,842 


64,927 


Baltimore 


104,232 


157,654 


199,908 


239,416 


304,163 


359,141 




4,427 


5,305 


6,181 


*6,381 


7,200 


7,434 




14,027 


15,283 


*14,813 


15,665 


*15,464 


15,980 


Carroll 


33,382 


39,875 


38,633 


*41,396 


43,668 


43,350 


Cecil 


23,189 


30,408 


40,402 


*41,519 


47,316 


51 , 589 


Charles 


8,394 


9,938 


10,145 


*11,709 


12,569 


12,805 


Dorchester 


18,987 


21,918 


26,403 


*24,433 


24,878 


25,373 


Frederick 


51,248 


65,234 


66 , 548 


69 , 634 


72 , 025 


72,153 




16,303 


21,653 


*19,661 


19,959 


*19,649 


19,319 




28,580 


39,763 


53,192 


*57,608 


62,304 


65,589 




15,670 


18,063 


18,386 


*19,385 


20,379 


20,822 


Kent 


14,519 


16,162 


*17,062 


*17,505 


*18,226 


18,253 


Montgomery 


45,503 


77,889 


109,635 


♦143,746 


174,794 


178,407 


Prince George's 


33,651 


59,312 


77,260 


*°96,035 


tH7,608 


+127,431 




14,793 


16,692 


16,778 


*18,069 


17,877 


18,838 


St. Mary's 


7,163 


8,289 


*9,084 


9,369 


*9,201 


10,123 




10,609 


12,392 


11,920 


*11,764 


12,637 


12,674 


Talbot 


16,927 


20,478 


21,682 


*23,437 


23,434 


23,368 


Washington 


62,570 


72,908 


76,348 


*80,311 


92,324 


100,670 


Wicomico 


20,394 


25,092 


*31 , 538 


33,602 


*35,106 


36,751 




16,579 


20,941 


21,084 


*20,727 


22,078 


22,729 


Baltimore City 


902,208 


1,255,978 


1,231,046 


1,237,321 


1,298,397 


1,416,729 


Entire State 


$1,563,933 


$2,139,486 


$2,256,619 


°$2,394,569 


$2,610,356 


$2,821,034 



* Includes reassessment figures. 1 Includes $5,157,010 for Greenbelt. 

Includes $3,257,010 for Greenbelt. j Includes $5,206,661 for Greenbelt. 



TABLE 114 

Assessable Wealth Back of Each Public School Pupil Belonging 1942-43 



County 



Total and Aver 

Baltimore 

Montgomery . . 

Cecil 

Harford 

Kent 

Queen Anne's. . 

Talbot 

Washington 

Frederick 

Carroll 

Wicomico 

Pr. George's. . . 



•2^8 

■j. n t 
on rt -± 5 

J23 5 © 



$1,404,305 

359,141 

178,407 
51 , 589 
65,589 
18,253 
18,838 
23,368 

100,670 
72,153 
43,350 
36,7. r .l 

127,431 



< 



170,444 

25,850 

15.961 
4,679 
6,717 
2,207 
2,279 
2,878 

12,486 
9,113 
6,253 
5,362 

19,063 



$8,239 

13,893 
11,178 
11,026 
9,766 
8,270 
8,266 
8,122 
8,063 
7,918 
6,933 
6.855 
6,684 



County 




Allegany 

Worcester. . . . 

Howard 

Dorchester. . . 

Caroline 

Anne Arundel . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Garrett 

Somerset 

Calvert 

Charles 

Baltimore City 

Entire State. . 



$96,579 
22,729 
20 , 822 
25,373 
15,980 
64,927 
10,123 
19,319 
12,674 
7,434 
12,805 

1,416,729 

2,821,034 



si 



< 



14,496 
3,651 
3,567 
4,396 
2,999 

12,456 
2,188 
4,400 
3,448 
2,181 
3,814 

107,039 

277,479 



Assessable JBasis for County Purposes Taxable at Full Rate 145 



1 8 
§' S 

i 



IS :■! 

ii « 



i i 

© 



i sissi-iiiiiiiiisins sssai 1 1 



J 



f 



I 33E3E333S33383S3388 . 38833 I I 
1 ^M^SSSESBSMSW 33338 3 2 



3 



§ i m.mmmummm% nm i g 
i i" ii^riiPm^iP iiiii i i 



III 



i IlIiiiliiiiiiiHIil liiil 1 1 
s BSaWs^si'iWssig" iiiii i i 



gg iisiiiiiisi 
ii iiisiiifiss 



mil 
iiiii 



13311 1 1 

iiiii 8 i 



i i ii aim m mm im 1 1 1 



in 



2i*8S3 



slS =83359 88EI i I § 



88888SgS3S83gS8g8S& 
8388833M^IM88 




— 5T 

88 S 



8 3 

8 8 

8 



liiil i s 

S8S88 S I 



FT 

I E 

I § 
s 



g88g8S8i83838£ii8ig 
gfiS&SM8883Sa688¥8 



MUTT 

83881 8 I 

ss a ?s" N 



146 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 116 

Calculated County School Tax Rates and Published County Tax Rates, 

1913-44 



County 



1943-44 Calculated County 
Tax Rate for School 



Current 
Expenses 



Debt 
Service 



Capital 
Outlay 



Total 



Total 
Published 

County 
Tax Rate 

1943-44 



All Counties 

Equalization Fund Counties 

Allegany., 

Anne Arundel t 

Calvert .. •. 

Caroline. 

Carroll... • 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick t 

Garrett t 

Howard t 

Kent t 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's — - 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington t 

Wicomico.: 

Worcester. 

Non-Equalization Fund Counties 

Baltimore t 

Cecil , 

Harford 

Montgomery t 

Baltimore City t 

Entire State 



$.554 

.642 

.850 
.756 
.560 
.576 
.587 
.642 
.564 
.584 
.683 
.669 
.548 
.602 
.522 
.515 
.662 
.538 
.625 
.595 
.540 

.452 
.325 
.488 
.503 
.677 

.687 

$.621 



$.116 

.138 

*.263 
.166 
*.144 
*.075 

<087 
*.202 
*.168 

<138 

*.026 

*'.i05 
*.085 
*.122 
*.185 
*.117 

.091 
.077 

*.045 
.040 

*.151 

.119 
$.118 



013 

017 

022 
074 
0-212 

038 
027 

003 
072 
010 

008 



050 



022 



009 
003 



002 
026 



002 
008 



$.683 

.797 

1.135 
.996 
.726 
.651 
.625 
.756 
.766 
.755 
.755 
.817 
.548 
.754 
.548 
.515 
.817 
.623 
.747 
.780 
.679 

.552 
.405 
.533 
.545 
.854 

.808 

$.747 



SI 


62 


$.40-1.20 


1 


53 


:81-.481 


1 


59 


.60-1.10 


1 


22 


.25- .80 


1 


00 


.30-1.05 


1 


20 


.50- .65 


1 


20 


.65-1.25 


1 


14 


. 10-1 . 15 


1 


56 


.15- .80 


1 


40 


§.04-§.09 


1 


01 


.40-1.05 


1 


35 


.20-2.60 


1 


00 


.30- .90 


1 


38 


.80 


1 


62 % 


.75-1.48 


1 


00 


.65-1.00 


1 


10 


.37-1.00 


1 


20 


.45- .95 


1 


00 


.55-1.20 


1 


22 


.03 




94 


.40-1.33 


1.00 


.80-1.05 


1 


50 


.05-1.43 


2 


85 





° Obtained by dividing county levy for school purposes by 
rate for county purposes. 

t For Calendar year 1944. 

* Levied directly by county commissioners. 

§ Plus cost of water. 



assessable basis taxable at the ful ; 



County Tax Rates; Parent-Teacher Associations 147 



TABLE 117 

Parent-Teacher Associations in County White and Colored Schools 



County 



Total and County 
Average 

Caroline 

Kent 

Somerset 

Wicomico 

Baltimore 

Anne Arundel .... 

Montgomery 

Carroll 

Calvert 

Queen Anne's. . . . 
Prince George's. . 

Howard 

Allegany 

Charles 

Talbot 

Frederick 

Harford 

Dorchester 

Worcester 

Cecil 

Garrett 

Washington 

St. Mary's 



White Schools 



Number 



1942 



452 



1943 



418 

9 
13 
15 
18 
45 
28 
40 
19 

6 
16 
45 

9 
29 

6 

8 
20 
21 
15 

6 

12 
23 
12 



Percent 



1942 



71.7 

100.0 
100.0 
93.3 
85.7 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
81.8 
100.0 
100.0 
88.0 
85.7 
76.7 
70.0 
71.4 
64.7 
61.5 
51.7 
75.0 
42.9 
48.3 
28.1 
17.6 



1943 



100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
93.8 
93.3 
90. 
86.4 
85.7 
84.2 
83.3 
69.2 
69.0 
66.7 
66.7 
62 
53 

50.0 
50.0 
44.4 
40.4 
25.5 
18 



County 



Total and County 
Average 

Anne Arundel .... 

Caroline 

Cecil 

Charles 

Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 

Talbot 

Worcester 

Wicomico 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Baltimore 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Dorchester 

Howard 

Calvert 

Carroll 

Harford 

Frederick 

Washington 

Allegany 



Colored Schools 



Number 



1942 



286 

40 
4 
6 
19 
44 
17 
11 
8 
13 
10 
19 
17 
15 
9 
12 
6 
14 
4 
13 
5 





1943 



265 

39 
4 
6 
19 
42 
16 
10 
10 
10 
9 
18 
15 
12 
10 
10 
6 
12 
4 
9 
4 





Percent 



* Two of these represent a separate elementary and a separate high school in nearby separate 
buildings which have a joint parent-teacher association. 



148 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 118 

Net Receipts and Expenditures from Sources other than County Public 
Funds for County White and Colored Schools, 1942-43 



County 


Gross 
Receipts 


Net 
Receipts 


Expenditures 
from Net 
Receipts 


Balance 
June 60, 1943 


Total 

Allegany * 


«pOOo , Uoo . A^fc 


$292,080.01 

4,393.40 
11,127.19 
108,897.31 


$182,248.01 

4,393.40 
11,127.19 
55,540.61 


»i ao qoo a a 

$ioy ,o3z.ou 










261,229.64 


53,356.70 


f"! n r nl i n p ^ t 
Carroll *+ 

Cecil * 


JO , ODD . O 4 


7,981.82 
26,596.81 
572.30 


4,120.91 
16,418.79 
572.30 


in 1 7Q no 

1U , 1 to .06 








Frederick * 


40,072.36 


10,241.93 
5,455.90 
2,204.08 

18,695.38 


6,182.17 
5,455.90 
2,204.08 
14,343.30 


4,059.76 








Harford *f 


20,094.19 


4,352.08 


Kent * 




5,132.85 
13,392.50 
4,592.27 


5,132.85 
13,392.50 
4,592.27 




Montgomery * 


















Somerset t 

Talbot t 


10,235.72 
17,316.44 
22,746.00 
133,848.13 


4,141.95 
8,900.01 
5,620.02 
51,123.08 
2,788.21 
223.00 


2,511.34 
5,058.54 
3,280.47 
24,910.18 
2,788.21 
223.00 


1,630.61 
3,841.47 
2,339.55 
26,212.90 















* Receipts and expenditures that were removed from the financial report, 
t Receipts and expenditures reported separately by the county. 



COUNTY AND STATE SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION 

The salary of a Maryland county superintendent as fixed in 
the State minimum salary schedule depends on size of teaching 
staff and years of experience. Counties, however, may and in 
most instances do pay salaries above those in the minimum sal- 
ary schedule. Salaries for twelve months in 1942-43 ranged 
from $3,090 to $7,000 and $8,500, in 1943 the average salary 
being $4,666 and the median $4,350. In ten of the counties sal- 
aries were higher than in the year preceding. Since the date 
of closing the school year was changed by legislation in 1943 
from July 31 to June 30, salaries reported in Table XIV on page 
216, are for eleven instead of twelve months. 

There were ten counties with fewer than 150 teachers, four 
having from 150 to 199 teachers, and nine with 200 or more 
teachers. The average number of teachers per county was 230, 
while the median county had 152 teachers. The smallest county 
had 63 teachers and the largest 611. In several counties the 
number of teachers was smaller than it should have been because 
there were not enough teachers available to fill vacancies. Sev- 
eral counties which would have had more than 200 teachers had 
they not carried forward a policy of school consolidation and 
transportation have replaced the additional problems of a large 
teaching staff with those of the transportation service. (See 
Table X, page 212.) 



Receipts from Other than Public Funds; County Superintendents; 149 
Changes in Certification Requirements 

Conferences of the County Superintendents with the 
State Department Staff 

The conferences of the county superintendents with the 
staff of the State Department of Education held October 5, and 
December 14, 1942, January 29-30, 1943 and during the legis- 
lative session dealt largely with the following administrative 
matters, some of which later resulted in action by the State 
Board of Education: 

Changes in Certification Requirements 

Adjustments in certification requirements became necessary 
because of the war emergency which brought an unusually large 
withdrawal of teachers at the time there was a very small sup- 
ply of qualified teachers available. 

The State Board of Education on December 17, 1942 and 
May 26, 1943 adopted amendments to By-law 57 which had been 
approved by the County Superintendents as recommended by 
their Committee on Certification of Teachers. 

AMENDMENT TO BY-LAW 57 APPROVED BY STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

DECEMBER 17, 1342 

In order that the public schools of Maryland may be adequately staffed 
during the Second World War and that teachers appointed because of the 
emergency conditions shall not be continued in the service after the emer- 
gency conditions cease, the State Superintendent may issue the following 
War Emergency Degree and Non-Degree Certificates for administrative 
and teaching positions for which candidates meeting the usual require- 
ments are not available. 

Degree Certificates 

1. War Emergency High School Principal's Degree Certificate, for which 
college graduation and approximately two years of teaching experi- 
ence shall be required 

2. War Emergency High School Teacher's Degree Certificate in Academic 
Subjects, for which college graduation and approximately twelve 
semester hours in the subject to be taught shall be required 

3. War Emergency High School Teacher's Degree Certificate in Special 
Subjects, for which college graduation with approximately fifteen 
semester hours in the subject shall be required 

4. War Emergency Elementary School Principal's Degree Certificate, 
for which a degree and approximately two years of teaching experi- 
ence shall be required 

5. War Emergency Bachelor of Science Degree Certificate in Elemen- 
tary Education, for which a degree shall be required 

6. War Emergency Degree Certificates in Vocational Home Economics 
and Vocational Agriculture, for which a degree shall be required, 
with considerable credit in the field in which the certificate is issued 



150 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

Non-Degree Certificates 

1. War Emergency Non-Degree Certificates in Special Subjects, for which 
approximately two years of college work with training and experience 
in the special subject shall be required 

2. War Emergency Non-Degree Elementary School Principal's Certifi- 
cate, for which approximately three years of college or normal school 
training with two years of satisfactory teaching experience shall be 
required 

3. War Emergency Non-Degree Advanced First Grade Certificate, for 
which three years of college or normal school credit shall be required 

4. War Emergency Non-Degree First Grade Certificate, for which two 
years of college or normal school credit shall be required 

These certificates shall be valid only during the Second World War 
and for six months thereafter and shall not entitle the holders to the tenure 
provided in Sections 52 and 89 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of 
Maryland 1939 and By-law 13 or to membership in the State Teachers' 
Retirement System; provided, however, that if a teacher who has tenure 
and is a member of the Teachers' Retirement System is transferred to a 
position where a War Emergency Certificate is necessary, he shall not lose 
tenure or membership in the Teachers' Retirement System during his serv- 
ice on the basis of the War Emergency Certificate. The usual medical 
examination by a physician appointed by the State Board of Education is 
not necessary for the War Emergency Certificate. 

Bachelor of Science Certificate in Special Subjects 

A Bachelor of Science Certificate in Music, or Art, or Physical Edu- 
cation, or other Special Subject may be issued to an applicant who has 
a Bachelor's degree from a standard college, who has credit for approxi- 
mately thirty semester hours in the Special Subject and for twelve semester 
hours in Elementary Education, including Educational Psychology and 
Special Methods and Practice Teaching in the Special Subject. This cer- 
tificate shall be valid for the teaching of the Special Subject in elementary 
schools. 

War Emergency Teacher's Contract 

By-law 13 was amended to provide for a War Emergency Teacher's 
Contract which eliminates the agreement regarding membership in the 
Maryland Teachers' Retirement System, and provisions regarding tenure 
after two years, but limits continuance of the contract until six months 
after the World War ceases. 

The action taken by the State Board of Education regard- 
ing war emergency certificates was ratified and confirmed by 
Chapter 947 of the Laws of 1943. (See page 9.) In Chapter 
79 of the Laws of 1943 the State Superintendent of Schools and 
the State Board of Education were given authority to issue war 
Emergency certificates and other certificates needed not already 
provided for in Section 88 of Article 77. (See pages 8-9.) 

Superintendents were urged to have teachers employed with- 
out certificates apply for war emergency certificates which would 
be issued if they could qualify. 



Changes in Certification Requirements 



151 



The State Board of Education, on May 26, 1943, passed 
the following resolutions and amendment to By-law 57: 

Emergency Renewals in 19 US 

In 1943 a certificate which is held by a teacher in service in the Mary- 
land schools and for which the full requirement has been met may, upon 
recommendation of the superintendent, be renewed for two years without 
summer school credits. If summer school credits are presented, the re- 
newal will be for the regular four-j'ear or six-year period. 

Waiving of Summer School Requirement, Section 156 

RESOLVED, That the State Department of Education waive for the 
summer of 1943 the provisions of Section 156 of Article 77 of the Annotated 
Code of Maryland, 1939 Edition, pertaining to the holding of teachers, 
institutes and relating to the requirement as to the attendance of teachers 
at summer schools. Authority to waive such requirement is granted the 
Board of Education by Chapter 947 of the Laws of 1943. (See page 9.) 

Supervisory Certificates in Special Fields 

Supervisory certificates may be issued in special fields as the need 
may arise. The certificates shall be based on a Bachelor's degree supple- 
mented by at least a year of graduate study. The credits shall include 
at least 32 semester hours in Education and adequate specialization, as 
determined by the State Superintendent, in the field in which the certificate 
is issued. 

War Emergency Certificates 

RESOLVED, That the State Superintendent is instructed to adjust the 
requirements for the War Emergency Certificates in the special fields, such 
as industrial arts, agriculture, music, art, etc., in order to meet the needs 
of the situation in the light of the preparation of the available candidates. 

Check of Teacher Certification 

Because of the large and continued teacher turnover, each superin- 
tendent was asked to check certification of all teachers in his county to 
be sure that each falls within one of the following classifications: 

1. Holds valid certificate 

2. Has been told certificate will be issued if medical examination is 
passed 

3. Has been told War Emergency Certificate will be issued 

4. Has been placed on substitute basis (The eligibility of substitutes 
for war emergency certificates will be checked if requested) 

5. Has applied to State Department for certification and case is still 
pending 

Proper Assignment of Teachers 

Superintendents were asked to assign teachers as far as possible to 
the subjects and levels for which they hold regular or emergency certifi- 
cates. As normal conditions return it will be possible for the State to share 
in the salaries of those teachers only who are properly assigned in accord- 
ance with their qualifications and certificates. 



152 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

Retirement Status of Teacher Members in Armed Services 

Because of the possible financial involvement of the retirement fund 
in unusual sums, and because there are provisions elsewhere for casualties 
among persons serving in the armed forces, the Board of Trustees of the 
Maryland Teachers' Retirement System on November 25, 1942 amended its 
ruling regarding the status of members on leave of absence for specified 
reasons to exclude, thereafter, those on leave of absence for military service 
from benefits on account of death or disability while in military service. 

If such a member does not withdraw his funds from the Teachers' 
Retirement System he protects his previous service for a period of five 
years, in accordance with the law governing the Teachers' Retirement 
System, and he also makes himself eligible for the provisions of any special 
legislation which might be enacted. 

Chapter 333, Senate Bill 212, Laws of 1943 takes care of the status 
with respect to the Retirement System of teacher members who enter the 
armed services and do not withdraw their contributions from the System. 
(See page 10.) 

Medical Examinations of Teachers 

Because of the abnormal turnover in the teaching staffs expenditures 
for medical examination of teachers have exceeded the budget appropria- 
tion. Superintendents were requested to refrain from having teachers 
undergo the medical examination until they have been notified by the State 
Department that prospective teachers have met the school credit part of 
the requirement for regular certificates. Medical examinations are not 
required for teachers holding war emergency certificates. 

Suggested Change in Sick Leave Allowance 

Requests were received from one county superintendent and from the 
president of a regional teachers' association inquiring whether it will be 
possible to allow teachers ten days' sick leave at full pay rather than 
twenty days at half pay. The 1941 Survey of the Maryland Public Schools 
recommended to the State Board of Education that this change be effected 
by amending By-law 34. There is considerable merit in the suggestion, 
as most of the cases of illness are for fewer than twenty days. If the 
superintendents recommend the proposed change which has been in effect 
in several counties for some time the State Board of Education will be 
requested to make the necessary change in the by-law. The matter was 
referred to a committee of superintendents for report. 

Serious Losses from the Teaching Staff 

Normally the percent of white county teachers lost annually 
from the teaching staff is close to 10 percent for high school 
teachers and 7 percent for elementary teachers. There has been 
'an increase in the last three years until in 1942-43 it was 630 
or over 34 percent for county white high school teachers and 508 
or over 19 percent for white elementary school teachers. (See 
Tables 57-64, pages 76-83.) 

Of the white county high school teachers who resigned, 25 
percent entered military or naval service, 15 percent went into 
defense and government work, 16 percent left for marriage or 
maternity, 9 percent left to teach outside the counties, while for 
18 percent the precise reason was not given. Of the county 



Retirement Status of Teachers in Armed Services; Medical 153 
Examinations; Sick Leave; Teacher Turnover; 
Teachers College Accelerated Course 

white elementary teachers nearly 29 percent left for marriage and 
maternity, 11 percent for military or naval service, nearly 12 
percent for defense and government work, 4 percent to teach out- 
side the counties, and 16 percent without giving a specific reason. 
The difference .in percent in high and elementary schools going 
into military service is due to the larger percentage of men 
teachers on high school staffs. 

The replacement of such large numbers of resignations with 
qualified trained teachers is practically impossible at the present 
time. The number of students at the colleges taking teacher- 
training has decreased sharply. To meet the very great need 
for elementary teachers, the teachers colleges are accelerating 
their work with summer sessions so that the course can be corn- 
completed in three years. All of the teachers colleges for white 
students are permitting their seniors to become cadet teachers 
in the county elementary schools. The cadets receive super- 
vision by the college staff as well as by the county supervisors. 
One of the teachers colleges early in 1943 permitted a group of 
junior students to teach in a county school for a half year while 
they had direct supervision from a member of the faculty who 
stayed in the school with them. The State supervisor of ele- 
mentary schools spent some time at work with this group. (See 
pages 159 to 160.) 

In order to provide for certification of teachers who do not 
meet present requirements for teachers, the legislature gave 
the State Superintendent authority to issue war emergency cer- 
tificates corresponding with regular certificates which shall be 
in effect until six months after the emergency is over, but the 
holders shall not be entitled to the privileges of membership in 
the State Teachers' Retirement System. Former teachers who 
have married or gone into other work have been asked to volun- 
teer their services as teachers and are given these war emergency 
certificates. Each locality needs to survey its community to find 
possible teachers for the emergency. 

Where sufficient numbers of teachers have not been available 
classes have been enlarged for the remainder of the staff. This 
has created dissatisfaction and has promoted further losses of 
teachers. Since elementary school classes in Maryland are larger 
than those in the entire country according to statistics from the 
U. S. Office of Education, further enlargement due to lack of 
teachers will certainly affect instruction of children disastrously. 

Principals and school officials need to stress with teachers 
the long-term advantages of the teaching profession, the im- 
portance of their work to boys and girls now, the crisis which 
will arise if more and more leave the profession. Certainly a 
teacher who trains many boys and girls for positions in the war 
effort is making a very large contribution. The long-term ad- 
vantages and satisfactions of good teachers come from seeing 



154 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

their pupils succeed, from having former pupils remember their 
influence, from the security of their position due to tenure and 
provisions for retirement, from professional status and a posi- 
tion of importance in the community, from opportunities for sum- 
mer travel and study and for personal and professional growth 
under stimulating leadership. 

The need is for the War Manpower Commission to recognize 
teaching as a job essential to the winning of the war as is the 
case in England. If teaching were considered an essential job 
and the remuneration were increased so that it was more nearly 
in line with amounts paid in government and defense work, 
teachers would not feel that they were contributing more to the 
war effort by leaving teaching at the same time that they were 
receiving increased rewards for their efforts in these other fields. 

The school officials and friends of the schools will continue 
efforts to have the State and local government officials recognize 
the serious conditions confronting the schools and the dangers 
which may come to the children and community if action is not 
taken. 

Adjustment of Teachers' Salaries 

Plans for obtaining an adjustment of teachers' salaries dur- 
ing the emergency so that the abnormal withdrawal of teachers 
could be checked and high school graduates would be attracted 
to take training to become teachers were considered by the 
superintendents as a group and in committees throughout the 
year. 

The following basic principles that should govern in any 
salary adjustment plan were presented to the Legislative Council 
on July 17, 1942: 

1. The State should make a basic contribution to the salaries of all 
teachers, and the political sub-divisions should be encouraged to 
supplement the salaries in accordance with particular needs. 

2. The present salary schedule should not be interfered with, the 
salary adjustment being made for the emergency only. 

3. A flat sum should be appropriated for each teacher, thereby giving 
a higher percentage of increase to the lower paid teacher and a 
lower percentage of increase to the higher paid teacher. 

4. Provision should be made for the adjustment to be effective for 
the school year 1942-43 and for each of the two years of the next 
biennium contingent upon the continuation of the emergency. The 
adjustment should be removed gradually rather than abruptly with 
the termination of the emergency. 

During the legislative session, the following statement of 
the school superintendents of the counties and of Baltimore City, 
and of representatives of the Maryland State Teachers Associa- 
tion, of the Baltimore City Teachers Association, and of the 
Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers, relative to teacher 
salary adjustment was presented to the Governor and members 
of the Legislature: 



Need for Adjustment of Teachers' Salaries 



155 



1. The principle of the bonus embodied in Senate Bill No. 147 will 
not, we believe, have the desired result in maintaining a teaching 
staff. In the words of the Baltimore Sun, "if there could be a 
surer way to induce people to leave the State's employment after 
July 1, we can not think of it." 

2. For this reason, we strongly recommend the following program 
for teachers: 

a. That an emergency salary adjustment should be provided at the 
rate of $20 per school month beginning February 1, 1943, and 
continuing until February 1, 1945, for which budget provisions 
should now be made. 

b. That the intent of the State to provide salary adjustment so 
long as the emergency shall continue should be expressed in an 
adequate way when the bill is prepared. 

c. That the adjustment should apply to all members of the public 
school teaching profession of Maryland, including those in the 
State Teachers Colleges. 

d. That funds for the salary adjustment should be distributed as 
other school funds, on the certificate of the State Superintendent 
of Schools. 

3. The program here proposed is an interpretation of the professional 
position of teachers in reference to salary adjustment. 

Because of the serious loss of teachers a number of the 
counties provided additional amounts for teachers' salaries from 
county funds in 1942-43. 



County Supplements 1942-43 to Usual Teachers' Salary Schedules 



County 


County Supplements, 1942-43, to Usual 
Teachers' Salary Schedules 


Amount per Teacher 


Total 


Total 




$487,743 
*38,500 


Anne Arundel 


*$100 


Baltimore 


150 


91,148 


Carroll 


65 


13,845 


Cecil 


100 


16,000 


Charles 


100 


11,800 


Frederick 


50 


14,200 


Harford 


60 


13,740 


Howard 


100 


11,400 


Montgomery 


°150 to 250 


104,000 


Prince George's 


200 


116,600 


Washington 


100 


38,660 


Wicomico 


100 


17,850 



* For high school teachers this was part of the revised salary schedule. 
Includes $100 paid directly by county commissioners. 



156 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

The Governor and 1943 legislature met in part the request 
of the County Superintendents and parent-teacher groups for aid 
in holding teachers in service and attracting capable and desir- 
able persons for the profession by offering an adjustment in 
salary of $20 per month for ten months beginning as of July 1, 
1943, and ending as of April 30, 1944. An amount of $1,800,000 
was included in the State budget to provide these additional 
amounts for the teaching staff receiving salaries of less than 
§3,000 in the counties, Baltimore City and the teachers colleges. 
The law also provided payments to the County Commissioners 
of $27 per teacher to any county paying teachers $140 more than 
the minimum salary schedule between September 1, 1942 and 
January 1, 1945. (See Chapter 739, Laws of 1943, page 8.) 

Changing Policies of Selective Service as They Affect the Teaching Staff 
and High School Students Soon to be Inducted 

At each meeting of the county superintendents, representa- 
tives of Selective Service presented the outlook and policies re- 
garding drafting and deferment of teachers and high school stu- 
dents. 

Physical Education 

In the fall of 1942 the badge tests in use for many years 
and the detailed physical education report on them were elimi- 
nated. A new type of "Physical Fitness" testing program using 
the California experiment was tried out on an experimental 
basis in many high and several elementary schools. Reports 
were sent in so that standards could be set up which would apply 
to Maryland children. Advantages of the new program are 
listed below: 

1. Ease of administration. As few as five events may be selected as 
a typical test. 

2. Clerical work of teacher reduced. Responsibility and leadership for 
judging and recording is given squad leaders and pupils under the 
supervision of the teacher. 

3. Individual weaknesses of children are disclosed and self improvement 
on a fair basis is stimulated. 

The plan is available for use upon request. 

Representatives of each county attended physical education 
conferences held under the auspices of the U. S. Office of Edu- 
cation and the U. S. Army and Navy, to get the benefit of the 
suggestions from representatives of these agencies on changes 
in the physical fitness program to help the war effort. The bul- 
letin on physical education which was one of the Victory Corps 
bulletins listed on page 170 was prepared by Mr. Minnegan and 
groups of our teachers as a result of these meetings and experi- 
ence with our own program. 



The Bonus Bill; Selective Service Policies; Physical 157 
Education Policies; State Aid Changes; Vocational 
Rehabilitation; Adult Education 

Changes in County School Population in 1942-43 Related to State Aid 

For the counties as a whole white elementary public school 
enrollment showed an increase of 3,000 or 3 percent in 1942-43, 
although the increases were confined to the counties surrounding 
Baltimore and Washington, D. C, Cecil, Charles, Calvert and 
St. Mary's. White high school enrollment decreased by over 700 
although Baltimore, Prince George's, Harford, Howard and St. 
Mary's Counties showed increases. The decrease in high school 
enrollment is explained by the decrease in elementary school en- 
rollment over a period of years and the loss of older students 
from the high schools to military service, war industry, and 
agriculture to take the place of the decrease in adult manpower. 

The following amendment to By-law 53 was adopted by the 
State Board of Education December 17, 1942 to meet this emer- 
gency in the high schools : 

If during the war emergency any high school falls short by less 
than approximately ten pupils of the enrollment required in By-law 
53 fcr the teaching staff employed, the State Superintendent shall be 
empowered to distribute State aid for one year only as if the enroll- 
ment requirement had been met. 

The average daily attendance requirement of 40 pupils per 
teacher before an additional teacher can be appointed was made 
four instead of five months for the emergency. 

Another stimulus to reduction in the size of elementary 
school classes in small schools came from Chapter 787 of the Laws 
of 1943 which provides that no school shall lose a teacher until 
the average attendance falls below 35 in a two-teacher school; 
below 70 in a three-teacher school ; or below 105 in a four-teacher 
school. (See page 9.) 

Expansion of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program 

The Governor approved a request for an amendment to the 
1943 State Public School Budget transferring $10,000 from un- 
used funds to the vocational rehabilitation fund. An allotment 
of $38,500 of Federal funds is made to the State on a matching 
basis, but the State appropriated only $15,000 in 1942 and in 1943. 
With the transfer of $10,000 of State funds in 1943 the State 
and Federal amount each became '$25,000 a total of $50,000 
thus being available. The additional money made it possible to 
put on three extra workers and to care for many additional cases 
needing rehabilitation. A great deal of additional work is being 
done in connection with cases referred by the State Industrial 
Accident Commission. (See Table 80, page 106.) 

Expansion of the Adult Education Program 

A transfer of $10,000 of unexpended money was requested 
to the adult education fund, for which there was an appropria- 
tion of $10,000 in 1943 and this additional appropriation was 



158 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

requested in the budgets for 1944 and 1945. This will permit 
the amount allocated to each county from the adult education 
fund to be double that available in 1941-42. The use of these 
funds in a program of consumer education to help women to 
learn how to use point rationing, to make wise purchases of 
food which will promote good nutrition and to conserve clothing 
was requested and approved. (See Table 79, pages 104-105.) 

For the Program of Training Workers for War Production, 
see pages 107 to 110. 

Examinations for Scholarships 

The following resolution regarding scholarship examinations 
was passed by the County Superintendents at the high school 
principals' meeting on Friday, April 16, 1943. 

I All scholarship examinations that are supervised by county boards 
of education should be given on the same day. As May 22, 1943, 
has already been designated by Baltimore City and several counties 
as the date for the examinations this year, it is requested that 
all the colleges cooperate in giving scholarship examinations on 
this date. The fourth Saturday in May of each year might be the 
designated day. 

II All colleges should use the same examinations, (Maryland Insti- 
tute excepted.) 

Ill Notices of vacant scholarships should be sent to the county boards 
of education on April 1 of each year. 

St. John's College, Western Maryland College, Washington 
College, St. Mary's Seminary, Charlotte Hall, and Maryland In- 
stitute agreed to use the same date and the colleges agreed to 
use the same examination. Charlotte Hall and the Maryland 
Institute have special needs for a different type of examination. 

It was suggested that the colleges purchase the same test 
as a group and prorate the charges, and, further, that after 1943 
the county superintendents take care of the advertising of the 
examinations, with each college bearing its proportionate share 
of the cost. 

The Victory and Withholding Tax 

Plans for collecting and reporting the victory and withholding tax from 
teachers and other employees of School Boards were raised by the super- 
intendents. It was necessary to consult local and Washington officials of 
the Office of Internal Revenue before numerous questions which arose 
could be straightened out. It took some time before a ruling was received 
that the tax did not apply to contractors for school buses. Whether the 
victory or withholding tax would apply to summer payments of teachers 
paid in twelve installments and to bonus payments of $20 in July and 
August, 1943 had to be taken up for definite rulings. 



Adult Education; Scholarships; Victory and Withholding 159 
Tax; Bus and Tire Rationing; Teachers' Contribution 
to Rationing and Promotion of War Saving; Supervi- 
sion of County Elementary Schools 



The Bus and Tire Rationing Situation 

Whenever there were changes in policy of the Office of Defense Trans- 
portation affecting transportation of pupils on school buses, such as regu- 
lations regarding rationing of buses and tires and their recapping and 
rationing of gas, officials of the agency came to the meetings of county 
superintendents to explain the situation. 

Teacher Contributions to the Rationing Program in 1942-43 

The teachers of Maryland took care of the issuance of nearly 1,957,000 
copies of War Ration Book 2 which contains the blue and red coupons. 
The amount of canned goods on hand had to be declared and in accordance 
with the excess found the teachers had to clip out the appropriate number 
of number eight coupons. 

The registration of approximately 150,000 applications for fuel oil 
ration books was also a responsibility of the teachers, together with the 
calculation of the amounts to which individuals were entitled according 
to formulae made available. 

Teacher Promotion of Sale of War Savings Stamps and Bonds 

It is estimated that with the stimulus of teacher and principal en- 
couragement pupils in the county public schools of Maryland invested ap- 
proximately $1,380,000 in war stamps and bonds at the schools during the 
school year 1942-43. 

State Supervision of Elementary Schools 



TABLE 119 

Number of Supervisors in Maryland Counties for Varying Numbers of 
White Elementary Teachers, 1942-43 



Number of 


Number of 






White 


Supervisors 


Number 




Elementary 


Allowed 


of 


Names of Counties 


Teachers 


by Law 


Counties 




Less than 80 


1 


12 


Calvert, Caroline, Charles, Dorchester, Howard, Kent, 
Queen Anne's, St. Mary's, Somerset, Talbot, Wicomico, 
Worcester 


80 to 119 


2 


3 


Cecil (1), Carroll, Garrett 


120 to 185 


3 


3 


Anne Arundel (2), Frederick (2), Harford (2) 


186 to 235 


4 




236 to 285 


5 


'i 


t* Washington 


286 to 335 


6 


3 


ftAllegany, t*Montgomery (4.5), °Prince George's (5) 
x°t*Baltimore 


336 to 385 


7 


1 



() The number of supervisors actually employed in October, 1942, is shown in parentheses for 
counties which employed fewer than the minimum number required by law. 
* Includes a supervisor of music, 
t Includes a supervisor of art. 

Includes a supervisor of physical education and health. 
t Includes a supervisor of special education. 

x Includes an assistant superintendent in charge of curriculum and instruction. 

After Miss Simpson's retirement the work of supervision of 
elementary schools was taken over by Miss Grace Alder who 
came to the Department staff in August 1942 after experience 
as a county supervisor in Carroll and Montgomery. Learning 
to know the superintendents and supervisors in the 23 counties, 
their objectives, problems and schools, visiting the State teach- 



160 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



ers colleges, following up work and training of cadet teachers 
(especially those from Salisbury teaching in Anne Arundel) , with 
the additional work necessary to development of the child care 
program (see pages 161-2), took up the first year Miss Alder 
spent in State Supervision. During visits to the counties further 
suggestions and criticisms of the tentative cumulative record card 
for elementary pupils were gathered which made possible at the 
end of the year the draft of a card which became available in 
September, 1943. 

A work-conference of the elementary supervisors with the 
State Teachers College faculty was held at Towson State Teachers 
College April 29-30, 1943 with the theme "Problems Facing Edu- 
cational Leadership in Today's Schools." 

At the first general morning meeting on "New Emphases in the Cur- 
riculum" members of the Towson faculty gave talks on Global Geography 
involving Globes, Maps and Changes in World Outlook; Science and Con- 
sumer Education dealing with scientific research and its implications for 
future education and citizenship; the Problems of Intercultural Education 
leading to understanding of all races and creeds and their contributions to 
American life; and Recent Trends in the Use of Audio- Visual Aids. 

Four discussion groups dealing with "Present Problems with which 
the Elementary Schools are Concerned" met to prepare reports on: 

I Health of the Elementary School Child— Nutrition, Physical Edu- 
cation, Mental Health 

II Skills which Function in Children's Living — Skills in the Funda- 
mental Subjects; in Democratic Living 

III Making the Activities Related to the War Effort Educational 
Activities 

IV Extended School Services: Before — and After — School Programs; 
Plans for Summer Activities 

Dr. Wiedefeld at a general meeting presented "Some Axioms and Prin- 
ciples for Elementary School Teachers to which the State Teachers College 
at Towson Subscribes." This was followed the next morning by a dem- 
onstration in physical education in the children's gymnasium, and observa- 
tion in the Lida Lee Tall Elementary School. While observing, it was 
suggested that supervisors identify what was being done as: 

1. What problems in real living are involved? 

2. What is the school doing as its part in meeting these problems? 

3. How is the school helping the pupil to 

a. Make his own program? 

b. Attack his program? 

c. Know when he is succeeding? 

d. Develop skills and attitudes of good citizenship? 

The two-day conference ended with a presentation of "Procedures for 
Meeting Present Issues" by Miss Alder, a talk on "The Supervisor as an 
Educational Leader" by Dr. Pullen, and reports of the discussion groups. 

The assistant supervisor of physical education, and the su- 
pervisor of special education, Mr. David Zimmerman, who came 
to the State Department staff in August 1942, gave considerable 
time to supervision of the elementary schools in their particular 
fields. For the number of special classes for retarded children 
in the various counties, see Table 27, page 47. 



State Supervision of Elementary Schools and the 161 
Child-Care Program 

the child-care program 

In March, 1943 the State Board of Education approved the appoint- 
ment of a State Group-Care Consultant to work with the State Supervisors 
of Elementary Schools and Special Education in the determination of need 
for services to children of working mothers as well as in the promotion 
and coordination of these programs in the State. The need for child-care 
has been most acutely felt in seven areas in the State, each of which 
requires the full-time services of a professional Regional Coordinator of 
Services of Children of Working Mothers to work closely with the child- 
care committees toward the promotion, development and coordination of 
resources for the care of children. 

Salaries for this administrative and supervisory personnel are paid 
from the President's Emergency Fund allocated to the Office of Defense, 
Health and Welfare Services. Six counties — Harford, Prince George's, 
Anne Arundel, Montgomery, Allegany and Washington — appointed re- 
gional coordinators in March and April, 1943. 

The duties of the State Group-Care Consultant are as follows: 

1. To give technical assistance to the Regional Coordinators, super- 
intendents of schools, and local committees in regard to such things 
as establishing projects, selecting personnel, establishing standards, 
and carrying out procedures. 

2. To plan training programs for the workers in local group-care 
projects. 

3. To establish tentative standards for group-care on a State-wide 
basis. 

4. To assist in the general supervision of group-care projects through- 
out the State. 

The duties of the Regional Coordinators are as follows: 

1. To assist local committees in determining the need for services to 
children of working mothers. 

2. To assist the local committees and local departments of education 
to establish group-care projects for children of working mothers. 

3. To assist the local operating agencies in selecting personnel, estab- 
lishing standards, and carrying out procedures incidental to pre- 
school and before- and after-school services. 

4. To consult with the State Child-Care Committee concerning the 
programs made in group child-care programs in the different local- 
ities. 

5. To carry forward the policies and program of extended school 
services established by the State Department of Education. 

A 34-page mimeographed bulletin prepared by the State Supervisor 
of Elementary Schools and the State Group-Care Consultant in April, 1943 
entitled "Child-Care Centers for Pre-School Children of Working Mothers" 
was organized with the following captions: Administration and StalT, 
Health Program, Housing, Daily Program and Records, Wholesome Food 
for Children, Routine Equipment, Play Equipment, Parents' Responsibility, 
Literature and Music Experiences, Helpful Books and Pamphlets. 

The program provides for Federal aid from Lanham Act funds for cost 
of equipment, and one-half of the cost of operation. The remaining half 
of operation costs, varying from $2.50 to $5.00 per week, is paid by the 
parent. The average capacity of each center in the counties is 30 children. 



162 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



Those in Baltimore City take care of from 30 to 60 children. In some 
cases children up to the age of 14 years who are without care when school 
is not in session are permitted on the request of their parents to come to 
the center and the teacher has them participate in the program of help- 
ing care for the younger children. Many agencies cooperated in the de- 
velopment of the program. 

Centers financed with Lanham Act Federal funds and payments by 
parents were in operation in May and June 1943 in the following counties: 





No. of 


Centers 


No. of 


County 


White 


Colored 


Children 


Baltimore 


3 


1 


124 


Dorchester 


1 


1 


49 


Harford 


3 





59 


Washington 


1 





47 


Baltimore City 


11 


5 


574 



Supervision of High Schools 

In August 1942 an additional high school supervisor, Mr. 
Wilbur Devilbiss, who had been principal of the Frederick High 
School was appointed to the State Department Staff. With this 
appointment the work of the high school supervisors was rear- 
ranged to reduce the number of teachers for whom each was 
responsible to between 275 and 350 and to take care of extra 
assignments : 

Mr. Fontaine — The nine counties of the Eastern Shore; accrediting 
of private schools. 

Mr. Spitznas — The four westernmost counties; accrediting of pri- 
vate schools. 

Dr. Hawkins — Baltimore, Carroll, Harford and Howard Counties; 
equivalence examinations; accrediting of private schools and 
colleges. 

Mr. Devilbiss — The five Southern Maryland Counties and Mont- 
gomery. 

In addition there were the supervisors of special subjects 
who took care of the teachers in their particular fields: viz., 
industrial arts and education, home economics, vocational and 
educational guidance, agriculture (part-time) , physical education 
and recreation (Mr. Donald I. Minnegan acting part-time while 
on leave from Towson State Teachers College), the special edu- 
cation high school classes for retarded youth (Mr. David Zim- 
merman, formerly principal at Catonsville appointed as of August 
1,1942). 

Four counties (Allegany, Baltimore, Carroll and Montgom- 
ery) each employed a full-time high school supervisor, while two 
(Anne Arundel and Harford) had part-time supervisors of high 
schools with whom the State supervisors cooperated when they 
visited these counties. 



The Child-Care Program; State Supervision of 
High Schools; Mathematics in Wartime 



163 



Mathematics in Wartime 

The criticism of military officials regarding the quality and 
quantity of mathematics taught in the high schools, especially 
mastery of arithmetic, may be explained because skills learned 
in the elementary school were not always maintained through 
high school. To remedy the situation the State Department 
financed an arithmetic testing program of 45,000 pupils in county 
high schools in October 1942 and May 1943 and provided sug- 
gestions for a remedial follow-up program. 

In the State Department bulletin "Mathematics and Science 
in Wartime" published in October 1942 prepared by Dr. Hawkins 
for mathematics and Mr. Devilbiss for science, teachers were 
urged to place unusual emphasis on inculcating in each pupil the 
importance of complete understanding, of absolute accuracy, of 
the habit of consistently checking all computations and of the 
need for skill. 

Each high school was asked to plan for 

1. Definite provision for every pupil to maintain arithmetic skills 
throughout his high school course. 

2. Special remedial work for pupils markedly deficient in arithmetic 
skills. 

3. Until the maintenance course is effective throughout the high 
school course, a thorough review course in arithmetic funda- 
mentals for seniors or those planning to leave school. 

4. An offering of as much higher mathematics as possible. 

5. Encouragement of superior pupils with appropriate ability to 
enroll for a maximum amount of mathematics. 

For enrollment in various courses in mathematics in 1942-43, see Table 
39, page 61. 

Science in Wartime 

PRE-INDUCTION COURSES 

The county high schools enrolled the following number of boys and 
girls for pre-induction courses in 1943: 

Number of 
County Enrollment of 



Pre-induction Course in 


High Schools 


Boys 


Girls 


Fundamentals of Electricity 


74 


1600 


1095 


Fundamentals of Machines 


62 


1321 


618 


Fundamentals of Shopwork 


56 


1881 


215 


Fundamentals of Radio 


3 


61 




Fundamentals of Automotive Mechanics 8 


225 


228 


Radio Maintenance and Repair 


2 


14 




Radio Code Practice 


17 


200 


113 


Automobile Mechanics 


5 


81 




Total 




5383 


2269 



164 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



In line with the desire of the military and naval authorities 
for more science for inductees it was recommended that all first 
and second year pupils have general science and biology and 
boys of ability have three years of science including physics 
and at least one of the pre-induction courses issued by the army 
to help in orienting boys. 

For science offerings in county high schools see Table 41, 
page 63. 

Instruction in aeronautics was recommended either for a 
separate course, as part of an existing course, or in a future 
core curriculum. In March 1943, there were 34 county high 
schools which enrolled 581 boys and 108 girls in pre-flight aero- 
nautics. 

Redirection of the School Program in Wartime 

The State-wide high school curriculum study started in 
1941-42, because of gas and tire rationing in 1942-43 had to be 
carried on in individual counties and schools and the emphasis 
naturally had to be shifted to problems resulting from the War. 
Out of the discussions of some of these county groups and out 
of the thinking of the State Department members came the 
150 page bulletin "The Redirection of the School Program in 
Wartime" in December 1942 prepared under the general super- 
vision of Mr. Fontaine. 

The Social Studies and English 

The social studies received special emphasis in the bulletin 
which attempted to set forth the issues involved in the war: 
viz., why we are fighting, what we are fighting for and the kind 
of peace we hope to achieve. Material for the teachers of social 
studies and English to use in developing pupils as intelligent, 
active and efficient members of our democratic society at this 
time of crisis was presented under the following headings: 

The meaning of democracy — duties and responsibilities of citizens 

in a democracy — economic aspects of democracy 
The aims and purposes of Nazi Germany 
The German system of education 
Axis propaganda methods and deception 
Nazi treatment of conquered peoples 
The interdependence of the United Nations 
Great Britain's contribution to the war 
Germany and England — Past and Present 
Present day Russia and its contribution to the war 
The Monroe doctrine — Past and Present 
Latin-American relations 
Far-Eastern relations 
Propaganda, good and bad 



Science Changes; Redirection of the School Program 165 

Constructive criticism vs. subversion and sedition 
Necessary modifications of democracy in wartime-consumer educa- 
tion 

The isolationist illusion 

Terms for a durable peace — establishment of the four freedoms — 
The tragedy resulting from nations' failures to live up to their 
commitments 

Post-war problems 

Global geography from the point of view of the air age 
The need of understanding and getting along with people of all 
races and nationalities 

Teaching an Understanding of the War and the Peace, Current Events 
in the Present War Situation, Opportunities for the Practice of Democracy 
in the School, and the School's Responsibility for Sustaining Morale were 
other sections contributing to the social studies program. 

How other school subjects and services could be redirected 
to contribute more effectively to the war effort were presented 
by teachers and supervisors in this bulletin of nearly 150 pages. 
Much of the following material is in the bulletin. 

Changes in the Physical Education Program 

More time for physical education was recommended although 
the drafting of many of the teachers in this field made this par- 
ticularly difficult. The State Department recommended a mini- 
mum of three periods a week, with five periods wherever pos- 
sible in addition to units on health education and participation 
in vigorous exercise outside of school hours. To help teachers 
with little training carry on this larger physical education pro- 
gram one of the Victory Corps series of bulletins included helpful 
material with pictographs. 

Industrial Arts and Education for Boys as well as Girls 

The pre-induction course "Fundamentals of Shopwork" is 
basic to more military occupations than any other single pre- 
induction course. The course is based on 90 periods of instruc- 
tion for one semester, but the Army recommends at least two 
semesters. Shop teachers and facilities should be available in 
connection with pre-induction courses in Fundamentals of Elec- 
tricity, Radio, Machines, Automotive Mechanics, and where 
feasible, Radio Maintenance and Repair. 

If trained teachers are not available the use of tradesmen 
or other persons with special talents for full- or part-time is 
suggested. The full-time use of all shop facilities is of para- 
mount importance. 

Suggestive content for pre-induction shop courses are: 

a. Knowledge of the tools and materials utilized in war industries 
and mechanized units 



166 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



b. Manipulative experiences applicable in processing war-industry 
materials 

c. Full understanding and the acquiring of right attitudes in respect 
to acceptable worker relationships on the job 

d. Safety alertness and assured safety and health practices 

e. Consistently effective work habits of dexterity, perseverance, 
thoroughness, accuracy, integrity, reasonable speed, self-direction 
etc. 

f. Knowledge and abilities in interpreting blueprints and specific 
work-directives. Ability to visualize 

g. Abilities in measuring, simple calculating, and checking 

h. Ready identification of kinds and use-values of various power 
machines 

i. Any other general shop preparation that helps to "shop-break" 
a youth 

j. Consistent conservation of critical materials 

k. Production of useful and needed items for public and war agencies 

Home Economics in Winning the War 

For home economics classes 

1. Understanding point rationing and its relation to nutrition and 
requirements of an adequate diet 

2. Better use of non-rationed food and home canned foods from 
victory gardens 

3. Instruction in nutrition and home nursing for pupils in advanced 
classes. Red Cross certificates were earned 

4. Emphasis on child care with actual nursery centers in operation 
from a few hours a day a few days a week to an all-day program 
for a semester providing service paid for by parents in one school 

5. Repair and making over of outgrown, outmoded garments 
For Adults 

Courses in consumer education dealing with consumer problems in 
foods, clothing, and household equipment. Demonstrations of canning and 
food preparation. See pages 104 to 105. 

For Red Cross 

Teachers acted as instructors in nutrition for the Red Cross and after 
taking instruction in home nursing gave courses to advanced home economics 
students so that they earned Red Cross certificates. 

Vocational Agriculture and the War 

The agriculture program for winning the war centers around : 

1. The Victory Garden program not only for regular pupils but 
also for all persons in the community interested in it. 



Industrial Work, Home Economics, Agriculture and 167 
Guidance in Wartime 



2. War emergency agricultural production to meet the goals set 
for the farms in the community which will be known to local 
county agents. These should become objectives in day, part- 
time and evening class instruction. 

With the shortage of farm labor during the growing and harvesting 
season, plans for releasing youth from school under supervision should 
be made. For the boys taking agriculture this may become part of the 
work-experience program. For others it will be emergency volunteer serv- 
ice. In schools having a victory corps, it may become a part of the victory 
corps program. Teachers should plan assignments for these volunteers 
and check on their satisfactory completion on their return. Thus the vol- 
unteer may receive credit for the work done although he cannot be counted 
present. 

It may, however, be possible to shorten the school day or year. Suf-. 
ficient supervision of such service should be given to prevent exploitation 
or work beyond the strength of those volunteering. 

3. Reconditioning and repair of farm machinery, largely a program 
for the adult group. 

4. Future farmer instruction. There must be cooperation with 
other high school organizations, with the programs for salvage, 
sale of stamps and bonds, and in local contests, fairs and dem- 
onstrations. Students must continue to have group discussions 
on country life and its possibilities. 

Guidance in the Wartime Program 

Specific time and responsibility for guidance by carrying on 
the following activities was recommended: 

1. See that all records, including test data, are up to date and 
readily available. 

2. Secure current occupational information about the opportunities 
in the armed services, so that this information may be given to 
the pupils who will soon be eligible for military duty. 

3. Secure current information about opportunities for women in 
occupations definitely connected with the war effort. 

4. Secure information about opportunities in fields which are not 
part of war production but in which girls may replace men for 
active military service. 

5. Since 63 out of every 100 jobs in the armed services are technical 
to some degree, guide into courses in mathematics and science 
each boy who possesses the potentiality. Similarly, urge girls 
who are competent in mathematics and science to prepare for 
technical jobs in the women's war services, in industry, and in 
civilian life. 

6. Systematically counsel all boys and girls in the last two years 
of high school, in order that plans for the rest of the time spent 
in school and the days following school life may be fruitful of 
the best for the individual and that he or she may render greater 
service to the nation. 

In 90 of the county high schools for white pupils a guidance 
program was in operation in 1942-43. 



168 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

The Library in the Wartime Program 

The library needs to keep its book, pamphlet, map and record collec- 
tion up to date so that it can contribute to all of the subjects and services 
of the school the supplementary material needed to carry out' their ob- 
jectives redirected to meet the present crisis. 

Guiding Principles for Work-Experience Programs 

The American Council on Education in its publication "What the High 
Schools Ought to Teach" makes the statement, "There is no factor of gen- 
eral education which is more important to consider than work." The bulletin 
goes on to point out the fact that providing work experience outside the 
school in coordination with the existing high school program presents many 
problems. In order to answer the questions raised, "Some Suggested 
Guiding Principles for Work-Experience Programs," were prepared by the 
State Supervisor of Educational and Vocational Guidance with the assistance 
of other supervisors in the State Department, and approved by the State 
Department of Education and the county superintendents as follows.: 

1. The work-experience program should become a valuable educa- 
tional asset if it is planned as an integral part of the pupils' 
complete school program. 

2. A member of the school faculty, preferably the person respon- 
sible for guidance or in the department to which the outside 
work is related, should be designated and given time to super- 
vise and coordinate the program. He should aim to see that the 
work is educational and guard against exploitation. 

3. In the selection of students to be considered as eligible appli- 
cants, such factors as scores on mental, aptitude, and achieve- 
ment tests, personality ratings, grades in commercial and aca- 
demic subjects and industrial arts, number of units earned, in- 
school and out-of-school activities, age, physique, condition of 
health, and results of interest questionnaires should receive 
careful study. 

4. Permission to participate in the work-experience program should 
be granted only after the case has been carefully reviewed by 
a faculty committee or faculty member designated by the prin- 
cipal and approved by the County Superintendent and Regional 
High School Supervisor. 

5. Pupils should under no circumstances be excused full time from 
school for employment before the beginning of the last semester 
in the senior year, and preferably much later. 

6. Pupils meeting other requirements who can earn enough units 
to graduate by spending only part of the day in school may be 
released to participate in the work-experience program. 

7. Work-experience which the school has approved should be eval- 
uated for credit in the same manner as laboratory work of 
regular school subjects. Work-experience credits may be "in 
lieu of" rather than "in addition to." 

8. Any pupil who is participating in the work-experience program 
under the coordination and supervision of the school shall be 
considered as a regular school attendant only if his attendance 
at work is regularly and carefully reported by his employer. 

9. Pupils should be assigned to jobs on the basis of ability and 
according to potential as well as present competence. 



Work Experience Guiding Principles; The Victory Corps 169 

10. Every placement should be made only after the school has satis- 
fied itself as to labor standards, wages, and employment condi- 
tions. After the pupil is on the job, he should be followed up 
to see that the information originally given is correct. 

11. Work-experience should be real work for the beginner's pre- 
vailing wage of the area as prescribed by the Wage and Hour 
Law. In places where the Wage and Hour Law does not apply, 
employers should meet to establish the minimum wage. 

12. The cooperation and understanding of the labor unions should be 
provided for in those communities where unions are established. 
Advisory committees composed of union members and employers 
should be organized. 

13. Unpaid work should be done only for some non-profit social 
agency in the community, and even then should not displace 
some worker regularly provided for in the agency's budget. 

14. For work within the school the following guiding principles are 
suggested: 

a. Acceptable standards of excellence should obtain for all work. 
Sufficient time should always be allowed for careful work. 

b. Pupils should be given the opportunity to practice a particular 
skill long enough and frequently enough to gain confidence in 
themselves through mastery of the skill within the limits of 
their ability. 

c. There should be a rotation of pupil assignments. 

15. The duties of the persons supervising and coordinating the pro- 
gram should include visiting pupils on the job, making weekly 
reports to the principal, checking with employers on the progress 
and performance of each pupil, keeping adequate records, in- 
terviewing pupils concerning adjustments to be made, changing 
pupils to new work-experience when advisable, integrating school 
and work-experience when possible, having part-time experience 
grow into full-time jobs when possible and advisable, and match- 
ing the pupil and the job. 

16. The program of out-of-school work-experience should be thor- 
oughly understood and accepted by the pupils, teachers, parents, 
and community organizations. 

The Victory Corps 

In 1942-43 Victory Corps for which a program was set up 
by the U. S. Office of Education were organized or planned in 
126 of the 145 county and in all of the City high schools for 
nearly 18,000 county and over 3,000 City white students. The 
general membership was particularly appropriate for the large 
number of small county high schools and naturally showed the 
major enlistment. It required participation in the physical fit- 
ness program and in one of the wartime or service activities. 
The community service division enlisted participation from the 
largest number of schools with production, land, air and sea 
service following in that order. Only the large high schools 
could offer the courses required for participation in the more 
highly specialized air and sea services. Maryland County high 
schools did the pilot work in the development of what later be- 
came the victory corps, and organized the first three Victory 
Corps units in the country at Ellicott City, the Sherwood and 
and Montgomery Blair High Schools in Montgomery County. 



170 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



The State Department of Education issued the following 
series of lithographed Victory Corps bulletins containing detailed 
suggestions for Maryland High Schools : 

1. The High School Victory Corps, 22 pages, November, 1942 

2. The Redirection of Industrial Arts and Vocational Industrial 
Teaching Activities, 7 pages, November, 1942 

3. Redirection of Physical Education and Recreation Teaching ac- 
tivities in Wartime, 113 pages, January, 1943 

4. Membership in Victory Corps through Essential Agricultural 
Activities, 5 pages, January, 1943 

Supplement to No. 4, A Lesson Plan on the Victory Garden, 10 pages, 
February, 1943 

Adjusting and Accelerating High School Programs 

For 1942-43 only, adjusting and accelerating high school 
programs were approved under the following conditions: 

For pupils likely to enter the engineering, medical and similar pro- 
fessions and the armed services 

For selected pupils who can complete the course in three years or 
three and a half years 

For any youth facing induction in the next year or so, so that he 
may graduate or come as close as possible to graduation 

Award of the high school diploma in June 1943 was approved 
by the State Board of Education, December 17, 1942 for the 
following boys: 

Seniors inducted between December 1942 and June 1943 if 

The pupil has exhausted all possibilities for deferment until gradu- 
ation 

Three years of work has been completed and his work has been of 
the kind indicating successful completion of work required for 
graduation 

Each case is considered on its merits and approval is requested by 
the principal and granted by the high school supervisor 

Boys inducted into military service before January 31, 1943 if 

Three years of high school work had been completed 

Work was of kind that had he continued he would have graduated 

Each case is considered on its merit and approval is requested 

Regular period of induction training is completed 

Boys were urged to make application for deferment immediately upon 
being ordered for induction. They were advised that it is not unpatriotic 
to ask for deferment, but that it is recommended by Selective Service. 



The Victory Corps; Adjusting the High School Program; 171 
State Wide Conference of High School Principals 

No pupil should participate at the same time in a work-experience 
program and a program of acceleration. 

In the accelerated program, physical education, pre-induction courses, 
and major subjects like English, especially if there is weakness, should 
not be omitted. 

Summer schools in neighboring cities or set up in the counties may 
be used. Montgomery and Allegany Counties had summer schools in 1942 
and 1943 operated by members of the county staff and financed from 
fees paid by students. 

Individual additional outside work may be assigned and reported on, 
or recognized correspondence courses may be taken and checked by the 
high school teachers. 

See 13-page mimeographed State Department bulletin entitled High 
School Acceleration and Graduation in Wartime. 

conference of high school principals, superintendents and state 

department staff 

For their first State-wide conference the county high school 
principals met with superintendents under the leadership of the 
State high school supervisors at the State Teachers College at 
Towson April 16-18, 1943. Dr. Hollis L. Caswell gave the key- 
note talk on "Educational Priorities of Today" in which he pre- 
sented the immediate need of modifying the high school program 
so that the boys may be prepared for the life and death struggle 
they will be drafted to meet. They must be given an occupa- 
tional skill, an understanding of the issues involved in the war, 
they must be given guidance so that they will know what to 
expect in the process of induction, they need physical stamina, 
ability in elementary mathematics, and in oral and written com- 
position. Every; principal was urged to insure that boys in his 
school receive the best possible training for the tasks ahead. 

The principals were assigned to committees to report on the following 
subjects: 

Science including pre-induction courses 

Out of school experience 

Desirable emphases in existing courses 

English 
Social Studies 
Foreign Languages 
Business Education 

Making full use of teacher personnel under wartime conditions 

Building a school program emphasizing priorities 

The high school victory corps 

Junior high school in wartime 

The excellent committee reports together with excerpts from Dr. Cas- 
well's talk were mimeographed in a 29-page summary report of the high 
school principals' conference. 



172 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

Educational Experience Summary Card for Graduates and School Leavers 

The high school principals and teachers were responsible for seeing 
that an "Educational Experience Summary Card" was rilled out and in the 
possession of each school leaver, graduate or otherwise. The War De- 
partment requested that this information be supplied as a basis for the 
first screening of high school men for the Army Specialized Training Pro- 
gram and other civilian and military agencies will make use of the card. 
It was suggested that each pupil supply as much of the information needed 
in order that he may become familiar with his record and thus be prepared 
for subsequent interviews. 

Cooperative Report (Secondary School-Selective Service System) 

The teachers in the public schools of Maryland were authorized by 
the State Board of Education on May 23, 1943 to cooperate in an experi- 
ment to try out the use of Form CR43 to furnish to the officials of the 
Selective Service System the information therein included, relating to stu- 
dents or former students who are prospective inductees into the armed 
forces of the United States. Upon the completion of such forms, they shall 
be promptly delivered by the teacher or teachers to the principal of the 
school. The information provided by the Maryland teachers proved so 
valuable that the form was later put into use throughout the country. 

High School Equivalence Examinations 

During the second year of the existence of high school 
equivalence examinations in Maryland, 39 took the examinations 
in October 1942 and 31 in April 1943. Thirty of the 70 who 
appeared for the examinations in 1942-43 came for the first 
time while 40 had taken some examinations in the preceding 
year. Those who took the examinations came from seven coun- 
ties and the City of Baltimore. The law was amended to make 
it possible for a member of the armed services 17 years of age 
or older who is not a high school graduate to apply for an ex- 
amination to be furnished to his commanding officer and given 
by the appropriate service officer under regulations and condi- 
tions prescribed by the State Board of Education. (See Chapter 
81, page 9.) 



Cooperation with Selective Service; High School 
Equivalence Examinations 



173 



High School Equivalence Examinations 1942-43 



No. of 
Examinations 
Taken 


No. of 
Candi- 
dates 


Number Who Passed Following Number of Subjects 





1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


October, 1942 


5 

4.^. . . . 

3 

2...... 

1 ^ 


2 
16 
5 
9 
7 


i 


'2 
i 

6 


1 

2 

*8 


3 
5 


*9 


1 




April, 1943 


6 

5. ..... 

4 

3 

2.... 




1 

1 
10 

3 
10 

6 


i 


i 

'2 
5 


1 
1 

8 


2 


i 

8 




1 



Seven certificates were issued as a result of the October and seven as a result of the April ex- 
aminations. 



County 



No. Who Took 
Examinations 



October 
1942 



April, 
1943 



Subjects 
in Which Examina- 
tions Were 
Taken 



No. of Examinations Taken 



October, 1942 



Passed Failed 



April, 1943 



Passed Failed 





3 


3 


Anne Arundel . . . 


2 




Dorchester. .... 


1 




Prince George's . 




i 




i 


1 


Washington . . ". , 




1 




i 




Baltimore City . . 


30 


21 




1 


1* 


Total 


39 


31 



English I-IV 

General Mathematics. . 
Algebra I-H .......... 

Plane Geometry 

Solid Geometry. ...... 

Trigonometry 

Ancient History. . ....... 

World History. ........ 

Modern History 

U. S. History ....... 

Problems of Democracy 

Economics ... 

General Science 

Biology u 

Physics 

Chemistry.. .... 

French *.*■•»••. 

Spanish 

German 

Shop ._ 

Agriculture. . ,. 

Commercial ._. 

Art 

Music 

Total. 



29 
2 
1 

i 
i 

'3 

15 

3^ 

'4 
2 

i 
1 
1 

'3 

24 
'5 



18 



76 



* In the armed services. 



174 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 
Supervision of Colored Schools 

The State Supervisor of Colored Schools spends the greater 
part of his time in the field working with the colored high school 
principals and teachers and the remainder in assisting the county 
supervisors of colored schools and in finding qualified teachers 
to nominate to the county superintendents, this requiring more 
time than in normal times because of the abnormal turnover 
of teachers due to the draft, enlistment and work for the gov- 
ernment or defense industries. The State supervisor visited 
various colleges in the winter and spring to interview applicants 
for positions. 

In each of eight counties a full-time colored supervisor was 
employed toward whose salary the State gave $750. In Fred- 
erick and Talbot the part-time colored supervisor also acted 
as principal of the high school, in Caroline as principal of an 
elementary school, and in Harford and Carroll as part-time high 
school teacher. In Cecil, Howard, Queen Anne's, Somerset and 
Worcester, the attendance worker also acted as supervisor of 
colored schools, in Baltimore County supervision of colored schools 
was assigned to the assistant superintendent of schools, and in 
Kent it was done by the county superintendent. 

At the conference of county supervisors held in August 
1942, because of transportation difficulties the plan for curricu- 
lum study by groups from nearby counties was discontinued 
in favor of a study in each county. The task of county groups 
of supervisor, principal (s) and teachers, both high and elemen- 
tary, was seen as preparation of a curriculum which will contrib- 
ute to winning the war, much of which, however, will also apply 
in peacetime. The following objectives were set up: 

1. To make every subject functional, to the end that it will contribute 
to the winning of the war (Accuracy in mathematics; understand- 
ing of scientific principles; ability to understand written and oral 
English; understanding of issues of the war; loyalty to our de- 
mocracy; problems of international cooperation and the peace; 
avoidance of anti-social selfish attitudes exhibited in hoarding, get- 
ting more than one's fair share, not working to full capacity or 
full-time, not pulling one's full share of the load). 

2. To develop an ability on the part of the pupil to make adjustments 
(to rationing, change in hours of work, transportation facilities; 
use of food, clothing and shelter substitutes; need of conservation). 

3. To develop within the pupil a responsibility to observe all safety 
rules and precautions (in air-raids, travel, communication). 

4. To realize the supreme importance of national health in the pres- 
ent emergency and to exercise individual care in the observance 
of health habits to the end that our national health may be im- 
proved (Physical fitness; nutrition; precautions against disease 
spread by flies, filth, common drinking cups, improper clothing, 
bad ventilation and improper heating, venereal disease). 

5. To give every pupil the opportunity to develop vocationally accord- 
ing to his interests and ability and along lines that will contribute 
most to national defense (Development of skills needed in defense 
industry). 



Supervision of Colored Schools 



175 



6. To develop within the pupil a sense of appreciation and responsi- 
bility to conserve those things that are vital to the nation and to 
the individual (Rubber, tin, paper, gasoline, food, clothing, earnings 
to be invested in war bonds and stamps, time, education). 

It was brought out that if our schools are teaching effectively, it 
should be evident in improving the standards of the homes in the community. 
In many communities the teacher can find no suitable place with suffi- 
ciently high standards in which she can obtain room and board. 

It was agreed that the supervisors of all counties could develop these 
objectives through the following program: 

1. Work on teaching units which have to do with the war situation. 

2. Emphasize the promotion of health. (Actually teach health instead 
of teaching a textbook on the subject of health.) 

3. Improve the quality of reading. 

4. Attack overageness. 

5. Promote recreational advantages in the community through wider 
use of the school building and grounds with permission of the 
county school board. 

6. Give definite (not casual) attention to the irregular attendant by 
helping him make up the work he has missed. 

7. Try to produce thinkers — rather than mere memorizers. 

8. Revitalize physical activities in the light of the present war emer- 
gency. 

9. Teach thrift to teachers as well as to pupils and to the people of 
the community. 

10. Promote a music program for pupils in every school (Use of tonette 
suggested). 

Two conferences were held with county colored high school 
principals, one on administrative matters prior to the opening 
of schools, the other in May, 1943 to capitalize on their curricu- 
lum study of further desirable changes in the curriculum, as 
well as to review thq entire high school program. At the latter 
conference members of the staffs of the State Department of 
Education, Bowie State Teachers College and Morgan State Col- 
lege presented the need f or adapting the high school program to 
wartime needs of youth. The contributions of the academic 
subjects, music, home economics, guidance, agriculture, physical 
education, and industrial activities were presented by specialists 
in each of these fields, while the State superintendent of schools 
outlined the function of the principal as a leader in his school 
and community. The principals then met in work groups which 
prepared reports on the following topics which were mimeo- 
graphed and sent to each school: 

1. Necessary shifts in emphasis due to wartime for the fundamental 
requirements of the curriculum 

a. Need for more one-semester courses so that pre-induction 
mathematics and science courses may be offered 



176 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

b. Shortening periods or alternating and combining subjects so 
that more time is available for physical education and new 
offerings 

c. Providing more time for guidance 

d. Providing for a work-experience program 

e. Accelerating programs for probable inductees 

f. More flexible programs for interchange of classes for boys 
and girls 

g. Equal credit for academic and so-called special subjects 

h. Type of help school can give probable inductees 

2. The High School Victory Corps 

3. Science and pre-induction courses 

4. Mathematics and pre-induction courses and relation to other subjects 

5. Evaluation of the Special Subjects and their contribution to present 
needs 

6. Emphases in English and the Social Studies 

The State Supervisor of Colored Schools visited the Bowie 
State Teachers College during the year to study the quality of 
instruction and to confer with both faculty and students. He 
also continued to advise principals and teachers to direct to Bowie 
only those high school graduates who have maintained high 
scholarship records and who have the personal qualities neces- 
sary for a good teacer. 

The General Education Board made available §1,200 towards 
the travel expense of the State Supervisor of Colored Schools, 
but only $645.58 was used. 

Conference of Attendance Workers with the State Department Staff 

The attendance workers met in April, 1943 in the State 
Department Office in Baltimore under the chairmanship of Mr. 
Zimmerman, Supervisor of Special Education and Attendance. 

Legislation Resulting from Juvenile Delinquency Report 

Mr. James M. Hepbron, Chairman of the Maryland Com- 
mission on Juvenile Delinquency which had recently published 
a 300-page report summarized its major recommendation as 
the development of greater coordination and effectiveness in the 
various parts of the State's program of Child Care through 

1. The creation of a Bureau of Child Welfare in the State Depart- 
ment of Public Welfare within which there shall be a Division 
of Children's Institutions 

2. Placing the four State institutions for delinquent children under 
this Division, with approval of appointments of the heads of 
the institutions by the Director of the Bureau of Child Wellaro 



Supervision of Colored Schools; Attendance Worker's 177 
Conference 

Chapter 797 of the Laws of 1943 as amended to meet objections, gives 
the State Department of Welfare complete control of the final disposition 
of each case committed to it, but makes the Board of each institution to 
which children are committed responsible for final approval in the selection 
of its Superintendent. (See pages 11-12.) 

The primary purpose of Chapter 818 of the Laws of 1943, was to take 
away from the Baltimore City Juvenile Court, all power of treatment. The 
Court, a part of the Supreme Bench, is to be an adjudicating body to pass 
upon the necessity for treatment — such treatment to be determined by 
the new Bureau of Child Welfare. No provision for the counties has been 
made as yet, although the original recommendation called for a similar 
Court in each county or in each judicial circuit — said court to be a part 
of the existing Circuit Courts. The new Baltimore City law provides that 
no minor shall be tried as a criminal, but rather as a ward of the State 
— except that evidence and age of the individual may allow the case to 
be sent to the criminal court. The new judge is to sit as an equity rather 
than as a criminal judge, with final power of disposition in cases of de- 
linquency. The Court can commit dependent or neglected children to the 
care of the new Bureau of Child Welfare in the State Department of Wel- 
fare only. (See page 12.) 

One of the chief reasons for the abandonment of the former Juvenile 
Court, which was not a court of record, was the ease with which it was pos- 
sible to have children who had been committed to institutions released on 
a writ of habeas corpus, asked for by parents who did not consider the 
reformation or re-education of their children, or the bad effects of repeti- 
tions of commitment and release. 

The necessity, in many cases, for punishment of parents rather than 
of delinquent or neglected children was emphasized, since the former are 
generally the responsible individuals. Fines were suggested as one form 
of punishment. Punitive measures and stricter control of youth, however, 
are often necessary until they learn self restraint and the necessity of 
leading normal law-abiding lives. The Courts should be used only as a 
last resort — after other agencies have made every effort at rehabilitation 
and been unable to handle the case. Hasty resort to the Court, resulting 
in frequent or repeated warnings, is usually harmful. 

Work-Experience — Safeguards, Attendance and Scholastic Credit 

Regulations governing the release of school youth for emer- 
gency work on farms were presented from the agricultural angle 
by Dr. Cotterman, State Supervisor of Agriculture, with em- 
phasis upon the part that high school youth are expected to 
play in overcoming the acute labor shortages on farms. The 
following points were stressed : 

1. Teachers must develop a changed attitude toward war needs for 
food production so that pupils absent for essential work are not 
discriminated against by teachers and fellow-pupils. 

2. Schools should make and keep an up-to-date registry of all vol- 
unteers, with the local County Agent as the placement agency 
and such local labor resources should be utilized before outside 
aid is asked. 

3. Emergency farm work undertaken by school groups necessitates 
careful supervision by responsible personnel. 

4. Emergency farm work regulations demand careful interpreta- 
tion on the part of teachers, principals, farmers, and advisory 
committees if exploitation of youth on farms is to be avoided. 



178 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



Mr. Stapleton, Assistant Superintendent of Baltimore County 
schools, outlined conditions under which farm work can be in- 
cluded as a part of the high school work-experience program: 

1. Work-experience programs demand advanced, long-range plan- 
ning and execution of definite and specific responsibilities under 
a capable coordinator. 

2. Work-experience must be an integral part of the pupil's program 
and must provide new learning experiences, instead of consisting 
of routine work or chores. 

3. Attendance and scholastic credit can be granted for a well- 
organized and functioning work-experience program which ties 
up with the regular school program. 

4. "Emergency" farm work can not be interpreted as "work-experi- 
ence" except in these instances where it is carefully integrated 
with the Agriculture course. 

Dr. Pullen, State Superintendent, clarified the conditions 
regarding the matter of attendance and scholastic credit by out- 
lining the following procedures and policies as the basis for 
sound and uniform practices in all the counties of the State: 

1. No minimum number of days in attendance can be fixed as a 
basis for determining promotion. Individual circumstances must 
be considered in all such cases. 

2. Scholastic and attendance credit will continue to be given as 
in the past for pupil participation in regularly established and 
approved high school work-experience programs. 

3. The only conditions under which attendance credit can be allowed 
for emergency work on farms are: 

a. When such work is under the supervision of the teacher of 
Agriculture and is properly considered as a phase of the train- 
ing in that subject 

b. When the principal, by means of a shortened school day or 
by schedule adjustments, makes possible a pupil's being pres- 
ent for his regular school work 

c. When such pupils who have reported to school for their regu- 
lar work are sent out in groups for emergency work under 
supervision provided by the school principal 

4. High school pupils as well as elementary pupils who are marked 
absent because of emergency work on farms will be given scho- 
lastic credit commensurate with the make-up work accomplished. 

The Problem of Absence Due to Parental Neglect 

Of 21 attendance workers who replied to a questionnaire 
sent by Miss Grimes, 12 found that parental neglect due to both 
parents working was a problem. Parents should be made to 
realize that their children are their first obligation. When both 
parents of children work, care of children is usually neglected. 
When members of the family are separated, family ties are likely 
to weaken and problems are likely to develop. 



Credit for Out-of-School Work Experience; Children 179 
Neglected by Working Mothers 

One county reported that a large war plant needed labor and used 
all types of appeals to get it. Many married women with children were 
interested in working, some wanting to earn money which would enable 
them to secure necessities for their family, others wanting to be relieved 
of looking after their children. The plant recognizes the problem and is 
planning to establish a nursery school. Nursery schools, however, may 
result in the parents feeling less responsibility and neglecting children 
more than ever. The school should not assume all responsibility for absence 
due to parental neglect. 

In another county in which absence because of working parents has 
not yet become a real problem, it is felt that industry and public opinion 
should unite to urge women who are not mothers of small children to be 
the first to take the positions available. The necessity to work should be 
separated from the desire to augment the income. Even in England, the 
mothers of young children are still given preference in the drafting of 
labor. 

It was suggested that mothers be encouraged to leave their children 
at home whenever possible if interested school and civic authorities could 
help to secure suitable in-home services. A canvass of the older people 
or those physically below par might disclose some who could render such 
home service instead of working in factories. 

When other available labor becomes exhausted or in cases where 
mothers must work because of financial difficulty, the schools might extend 
before-school and after-school services to care for young children of school 
age. They could also extend cafeteria and summer vacation services to 
such children. 

Some children show evidence of fear, insecurity, and other forms of 
mental strain because of absence of father or brother for military service 
at a distance or for long hours of employment out of the home; absence of 
mother who works elsewhere; restriction of living conditions; etc. The 
school has a challenge and a responsibility to help protect children from 
this emotional stress by planning for their carei when parents are needed 
in industry. 

The following types of community planning may help to solve this 
problem : 

1. Appreciation by the community of the need for child care and of 
the possible harmful results of lack of care 

2. Determining the extent of the problem 

3. Determining the age groups needing care — the very young children 
needing nursery school, or school children needing before- and 
after-school, week-end and summer care 

4. Selection of a group of interested persons, a coordinating council 
of heads of schools, churches, service clubs, social work agencies, 
business organizations, etc., to organize the program 

5. Fitting the program to the need 

6. Utilizing volunteers or paid workers where the need exists 

Adjusting Pupils Living in Trailer Camps 

Before school opened visits were made to trailer camp homes by the 
county superintendent and attendance worker in St. Mary's County. The 
people they met were both genial and cooperative. The school program was 
explained and plans for grade placement, vaccinations, transfers, etc., were 
discussed. 



180 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



After school opened, more visits were made with the Health nurse 
and bonds were strengthened between the school and the home. These 
contacts proved to be of immeasurable benefit both to children and to 
parents. 

It was suggested that all school people should make more effort to 
know newcomers and make them more welcome. Children must feel that 
they are wanted. Moving from one defense area to another requires many 
adjustments, from which children possibly suffer more than is apparent. 

Truancy and Withdrawal from High School 

Mr. Willis, Superintendent of Schools in Washington County, 
presented the problems of which truancy and early withdrawal 
from high school are symptoms. 

The attendance worker must enlist the interest of teachers 
and principals in seeking to recognize immediately symptoms 
of maladjustment when pupils are in trouble at school, are truant, 
or want to leave school. This must be followed as soon as pos- 
sible by a study of the underlying causes. When these are 
determined, a program of action must be planned and followed 
through. Our goal must be every child in school every day (bar- 
ring sickness) for as many years as possible, pursuing success- 
fully a program of work appropriate for him and of real worth 
to the society which gives him the opportunity of attending. 
We must recognize the school as the agency which must adapt 
itself to carry out such a policy. Guidance counsellors must 
know and evaluate work opportunities — part- or full-time — for 
information and proper placement of youth. 

Mr. Ramey emphasized the following points in presenting 
the problem o£ truancy from high school: 

1. The problem of truancy, often a symptom of greater problems 
of juvenile delinquency, is aggravated in time of war because 
of greater emotional instability and lack of parental supervision 
and restraint. 

2. Meeting the needs of older truants requires an understanding 
of the underlying factors and the use of reason, rather than 
force. 

3. Wherever possible schools should and do make adjustments to 
take care of problems uncovered in study of the difficulties of 
truants. Often, however, poor teaching and inadequate guidance 
aggravate the problem. The understanding classroom teacher 
is the key to successful school experiences — other agencies are 
auxiliary. 

4. Truancy is a community problem as well as a school problem — 
resulting often from broken homes, unsatisfactory economic con- 
ditions, unmet emotional needs, physical or mental handicaps, 
as well as personal likes and dislikes. 

5. Adequate coordination of the efforts of all agencies — schools, 
social and welfare workers, civic groups, churches, law-enforce- 
ment groups — all these can and must cooperate to remedy under- 
lying conditions causing delinquency. Such cooperation can best 
be accomplished through the organization and proper functioning 
of a Coordinating Council in each community. 



Remedies for High School Truancy and Withdrawals; 181 
Child Guidance Clinics 



The Work of the Child Guidance Clinics in Maryland 

Mr. Thompson surveyed the work the child guidance clinics have 
attempted in Maryland and presented a goal to strive for in the future. 

In 1934, the Mental Hygiene Society of Maryland organized a series 
of clinics in the counties of the State, except Baltimore, for the purpose 
of providing a diagnostic service for the schools, health departments, and 
welfare agencies. Psychiatrists from various state and private hospitals 
who volunteered their services made periodic visits to these 22 counties 
according to a pre-arranged schedule. In many counties the cases referred 
by the health and welfare agencies were those seen by the psychiatrist. 
While practically all of the publicity stressed the child guidance service 
offered by the clinics, most of the children seen were sent into the clinics 
by county welfare agencies for routine examinations rather than by the 
schools for advice regarding educational adjustments and follow-up treat- 
ment. Furthermore, the report of the examining psychiatrist was sent 
to the county health officer rather than to the county superintendent of 
schools.. In the small number of cases in which reports were sent to the 
school superintendent, many of the recommendations were of such a char- 
acter that they could not be carried out. The superintendent of Allegany 
County, however, was able to secure some very valuable psychiatric 
assistance, while in Dorchester, Washington, and Wicomico the assistance 
was somewhat helpful. 

Now that the war has brought a discontinuance of the clinics, the 
responsibilities of the attendance worker will be even greater. He has 
the opportunity of becoming the hub in the wheel of all the influences 
revolving around a child's life and the coordinator of all efforts expended 
in solving problem cases. To help in meeting these added responsibilities, 
the following was suggested as a program for each county: 

1. Education of teachers in the study of behavior problems 

2. Clear understanding of all available services in the community 
and enlistment of their full support 

3. Training at least one member of school staff (either supervisor or 
teacher) in Binet testing 

4. Making arrangements for best possible clinic service and for su- 
pervision of local "treatment" of children and families 



182 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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Graduates of the State Teachers Colleges and Their Placement 183 



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184 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 122— Enrollment at Maryland State and Coppin Teachers Colleges 



Fall of 


Towson 


Frost- 
burg 


Salis- 
bury 


Total 
White Students 


Bowie 


Coppin 


City 


County 


County 


State 


1920 




184 


57 




241 


241 




124 


1921 




397 


101 




498 


498 




185 


1922 




506 


134 




640 


640 




225 


1923 




569 


125 




694 


694 


ii 


225 


1924 


518 


602 


149 




751 


1,269 


23 


211 


1925 


411 


513 


197 


107 


817 


1,228 


36 


161 


1926 


275 


475 


201 


158 


834 


1,109 


81 


117 


1927 


268 


402 


192 


170 


764 


1,032 


104 


121 


1928 


315 


359 


178 


186 


723 


1,038 


128 


99 


1929 


346 


368 


173 


174 


715 


1,061 


120 


125 


1930 


298 


348 


161 


165 


674 


972 


109 


171 


1931 


348 


306 


111 


127 


544 


892 


106 


145 


1932 


289 


257 


136 


101 


494 


783 


122 


127 


1933 


230 


230 


116 


114 


460 


690 


99 


282 


1934 


178 


193 


124 


108 


425 


603 


100 


111 


1935 


193 


147 


137 


185 


469 


662 


96 


112 


1936 


284 


175 


131 


201 


507 


791 


116 


141 


1937 


290 


186 


170 


210 


566 


856 


138 


163 


1938 


340 


222 


212 


239 


673 


1,013 


177 


168 


1939 


322 


249 


223 


273 


745 


1,067 


131 


164 


1940 


277 


234 


221 


221 


676 


953 


150 


156 


1941 


210 


209 


195 


209 


613 


823 


155 


161 


1942 


172 


162 


145 


159 


466 


638 


120 


154 


1943 


141 


146 


96 


154 


396 


537 


109 


163 



TABLE 123 — Distribution of Enrollment in Maryland State Teachers 
Colleges and Coppin Teachers College by Class, Fall of 1943 





Towson 


Frost- 
burg 


Salis- 
bury 


Total 
White Students 


Bowie 


Coppin 


City 


County 


County 


State 




36 


°45 


19 


59 


°123 


°159 


31 


32 




30 


26 


24 


18 


68 


98 


24 


33 




41 


31 


19 


22 


72 


113 


25 


39 




34 


*44 


*t34 


*§58 


*t§136 


*t§170 


29 


24 


Total 


141 


°*146 


*t96 


*§157 


°*t§399 


°*t§540 


109 


128 




14 


J90 


35 


53 


J178 


1192 


108 




Day Students 


127 


23 


31 


83 


137 


264 


1 


128 


Cadets 




J35 


30 


21 


J86 


J86 






Elementary School. . . . 


35 


211 


173 


79 


463 


498 


133 


729 



° Includes 1 student from out of state. 

* Includes cadets. 

t Includes 1 special student. 

§ Includes 3 special students from Maryland counties and 3 special students from out of state. 
X Includes two cadets who were resident. 



Enrollment at the Teachers Colleges 



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186 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 125 
1943 White Entrants at Teachers Colleges 







Percent Having Had Vari- 


Percent from High, Middle, and 






ous High School Courses 


Lower Third of Class 


State 


Total 
















Teachers 


Num- 
















College 


ber 


Aca- 


Gen- 


Com- 








Unclassi- 






demic 


eral 


mercial 


High 


Middle 


Low 


fied 


Towson 


81 


87.7 


7.4 


4.9 


58.0 


33.3 


8.7 




City 


36 


88.9 


2.8 


8.3 


47.2 


44.5 


8.3 




County 


45 


86.7 


11.1 


2.2 


66.7 


24.4 


8.9 




Frostburg 


19 


94.7 


5.3 




42.1 


42.1 


10.5 


5.3 


Salisbury 


59 


74.6 


23.7 


i'.i 


56.0 


30.5 


13.5 





TABLE 126 

White Freshmen Who Entered Maryland Teachers Colleges in September, 
1942, Who Withdrew at the Request of the School, or Voluntarily, Before 

September, 1943 





Towson 












Frostburg 


Salisbury 




City 


County 






Freshman Enrollment, September, 1942 


47 


30 


32 


61 




1 




3 


18 


Withdrawals at Request of School 


1 


i 






Voluntary Withdrawals 


3 


3 


'8 


7 


Withdrawals to Enter Armed Services 


1 


2 




20 




2.2 


3.3 






Percent* of Voluntary Withdrawals 


6.5 


10.0 


26.7 


i6*.i 


Percent* Withdrawn to Enter Armed Services 


2.2 


6.7 




46.5 


Percent* of Total Withdrawals 


10.9 


20.0 


26.7 


62.8 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, commitment or death. 



TABLE 127 

Faculty and Staff at Maryland State Teachers Colleges, 1942-43 





Towson 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Bowie 


Coppin 


President 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 


Instructors 


22.4 


11.7 


*10.6 


9.6 


5.6 


Library 


4.0 


2.0 


2.9 


1.0 




Campus Elementary School . . 


9.0 


5.0 


3.2 


3.0 


16.0 


Training Centers: 












County. . .* 


a5.0 






cll.O 




City 


bl2.0 










Office Staff 


8.8 


2.0 


2.0 


2.0 


1.0 


Dormitory 


3.0 


.7 


1.0 


1.0 





* Includes director of student training who acts as the principal of the elementary school, but 
excludes social director who does some teaching. 

a In three schools in Baltimore County. b In five schools in Baltimore City. 

c Three two-teacher and two one-teacher schools in Prince George's, and one two- and one one- 
teacher school in Anne Arundel. 



Entrants; Freshman Withdrawals; Faculty; Costs at 187 
State Teachers Colleges 



TABLE 128 

Total and Per Regular Student Costs at State Teachers Colleges, 1930 to 1943 



Year 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 


Fees 
Paid 
by 
Students 


Cost 

to 
State 


College 
Enrollment 


Percent 
Elemen- 
tary is of 
College 
Enroll- 
ment 


Average Annual Cost per 
College Student 


Total 


Percent 
Resident 


Total 


in 
Fees 


to 
State 



Towson 



1930 


$314,699 


$64,660 


$250,039 


604 


49 


43 


$521 


a$107 


$414 


1931 


311,674 


61,663 


250,011 


561 


51 


42 


556 


allO 


446 


1932 


277,642 


57,201 


220,441 


582 


43 


46 


477 


a98 


379 


1933 


261,686 


42,182 


219,504 


503 


36 


53 


520 


a84 


436 


1934 


210,135 


79,108 


131,027 


450 


36 


54 


487 


bl96 


291 


1935.; 


192,873 


58,317 


134,556 


354 


31 


71 


545 


bl65 


380 


1936 


179,751 


50,286 


129,465 


330 


25 


75 


545 


bl53 


392 


1937 


184,263 


65,395 


118,868 


438 


23 


54 


420 


bl48 


272 


1938 


217,359 


70,312 


147,047 


455 


26 


54 


478 


bl55 


323 


1939 


218,699 


81,737 


136,962 


531 


25 


47 


412 


bl54 


258 


1940 


224,929 


88,414 


136,515 


535 


31 


46 


420 


bl65 


255 


1941 


219,112 


82,597 


136,515 


482 


34 


49 


455 


bl71 


284 


1942 


222,487 


h74,468 


148,019 


403 


37 


58 


553 


hbl85 


368 


1943 


tl87,934 


53,264 


134,670 


*292 


38 


79 


644 


bl83 


461 



Frostburg 



1930 


$76,581 


$13,221 


$63,360 


161 


43 


65 


$476 


a$82 


$394 


1931 


77,554 


14,290 


63,264 


154 


51 


80 


504 


a93 


411 


1932 


75,575 


9,809 


65,766 


113 


50 


166 


669 


a87 


582 


1933 


71,254 


9,175 


62,079 


121 


41 


175 


589 


a76 


513 


1934 


61,359 


21,545 


39,814 


115 


49 


171 


533 


bl87 


346 


1935 


56,780 


23,230 


33 , 550 


117 


49 


171 


485 


bl99 


286 


1936 


59,558 


22,415 


37,143 


130 


42 


161 


459 


bl73 


286 


1937 


64,087 


23,444 


40,643 


131 


45 


153 


489 


bl79 


310 


1938 


77,755 


29,625 


48,130 


167 


44 


123 


466 


bl78 


288 


1939 


82,025 


33,895 


48,130 


204 


39 


93 


402 


bl66 


236 


1940 


80,919 


37,869 


43,050 


214 


46 


86 


378 


bl77 


201 


1941 


82,220 


36,535 


45,685 


210 


41 


85 


392 


bl74 


218 


1942 


83,889 


h33,398 


50,491 


186 


41 


95 


451 


hbl79 


272 


1943 


t69,071 


20,757 


48,314 


*116 


41 


167 


595 


bl79 


416 



Salisbury 



1930 


$98,930 


$27,456 


$71,474 


168 


88 


53 


$589 


a$163 


$426 


1931 


98,359 


28,005 


70,354 


160 


90 


59 


615 


al75 


440 


1932 


88,197 


20,475 


67,722 


124 


85 


79 


711 


al65 


546 


1933 


71,346 


12,575 


58,771 


98 


72 


108 


728 


al28 


600 


1934 


66,144 


24,267 


41,877 


114 


71 


102 


580 


b213 


367 


1935 


59,435 


20,706 


38,729 


109 


40 


121 


545 


b252 


293 


1936 


67,672 


32,289 


35,383 


184 


41 


69 


384 


bl92 


192 


1937 


70,185 


34,801 


35,384 


200 


40 


61 


351 


bl74 


177 


1938 


87,595 


36,608 


50,987 


210 


39 


58 


417 


bl74 


243 


1939 


89,119 


41,787 


47,332 


228 


49 


52 


391 


bl83 


208 


1940 


93,633 


48,746 


44,887 


268 


51 


49 


350 


bl82 


168 


1941 


84,281 


40,444 


43,837 


211 


55 


57 


400 


bl92 


208 


1942 


92,625 


h37,588 


55,037 


194 


47 


59 


478 


hbl94 


284 


1943 


t68,922 


23,185 


45,737 


♦143 


36 


59 


482 


bl62 


320 



Bowie 



1930 


$57,004 


$14,799 


$42,205 


108 


97 


61 


$528 


d$137 


$391 


1931 


55,917 


13,717 


42,200 


94 


98 


78 


595 


dl46 


449 


1932 


47,790 


13,600 


34,190 


97 


97 


71 


492 


dl40 


352 


1933 


55,064 


15,449 


39,615 


108 


98 


60 


510 


dl43 


367 


1934 


39,082 


13,385 


25,697 


89 


97 


65 


439 


el50 


289 


1935 


46,817 


14,723 


32,094 


87 


98 


68 


538 


el69 


369 


1936 


42,965 


13,571 


29,394 


86 


97 


79 


500 


el58 


342 


1937 


47,601 


17,673 


29,928 


111 


92 


59 


429 


el59 


270 


1938 


59,589 


19,275 


40,314 


128 


92 


75 


466 


el51 


315 


1939 


62,911 


19,069 


43,841 


158 


97 


65 


399 


fl21 


278 


1940 


57,695 


17,098 


40,597 


121 


98 


93 


477 


gl41 


336 


1941 


60,295 


19,270 


41,025 


140 


99 


86 


431 


gl38 


293 


1942 


63,134 


19,359 


43,775 


144 


98 


85 


439 


gl35 


304 


1943 


f56,693 


15,959 


40,733 


104 


99 


106 


545 


gl53 


392 



a Day students paid $20, women residents $200, and men boarders $72. 
b Day students paid $100, women residents $316, and men boarders $128. 
d Resident students paid $120, day students $9. Service rendered by students, 
e Resident students paid $164, day students $19. 

f Resident students paid $110, day students $15. Service rendered by students. 
K Resident students paid $140, day students $20. 

h Includes excess of receipts over expenditures of summer school students transferred to offset 
deficit in actual under estimated student fees. 

* Each cadet teacher is included as one-half a student. 

t Expenditures for ten month period from Sept. 1, 1942, to June 30 , 1943. 



188 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 129 — Expenditures and Receipts at State Teachers Colleges from 
Sept. 1, 1942 to June 30, 1943 



Expenditures 



College 


Total Expenditures 


Expenditures for Instruction 


Expenditures for Dormitory 


c 

.2 
"2 

J 

< 


2 

li 

Js a 
w M 


c 

a 

o w 


Operation, 
Maintenance, 
Transportation 


c 

« 
.fa 
.2 
'3 

1 

< 


Operation, 
Maintenance, 
Transportation, 
Health 


T3 

O 
Q 


Total White 

Bowie 


$187,934 
69,071 
68,922 


$16,287 
8,070 
5,781 


$94,147 
37,497 
35,956 


$6,283 
2,982 
2,592 


$27,894 
6,726 
4,332 


$3,171 
1,514 
3,601 


$27,010 
7,903 
13,281 


$13,142 
4,379 
3,379 


$325,927 
56,693 


$30,138 
2,297 


$167,600 
22,354 


$11,857 
2,247 


$38,952 
7,070 


$8,286 
2,182 


$48,194 
9,505 


$20,900 
11,038 



Receipts 



College 


Average 
Enrollment in 


Receipts for 
Instruction from 


Average 
Resident 
Enroll- 
ment 


Receipts for 
Dormitory from 


College 


Ele- 
mentary 
School 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Towson 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 

Total White. . 
Bowie 


*292 
*116 
*143 


229 
167 
84 


$29,577 
11,630 
14,300 


$115,034 
43,645 
34,361 


110 
48 
52 


$23,687 
9,126 
8,885 


$19,636 
4,670 
11,376 


*551 
104 


480 
110 


$55,507 
1,405 


$193,040 
32 , 563 


210 
103 


$41,698 
14,555 


$35,682 
8,170 



* Each cadet teacher is included as one-half a student. 



TABLE 130 



National Youth Administration Student Aid, 1942-43 



College 


N. Y. A. 
Student 
Aid 


Approved 
Appli- 
cations 


Aid 
per 
Student 


State Teachers College, Towson 


23 


$1,896.05 


$82.44 




13 


1,028.94 


79.10 




24 


1,218.32 


50.75 


State Teachers College, Bowie 


36 


1,180.00 


33.00 


Coppin Teachers College, Baltimore 


16 


1,150.00 


71.88 



Analysis of Costs Total and Per Student at State 189 
Teachers Colleges 



CHART 27 



Tows on 


°292 


229 


$496 | 


Frostburg 


°116 


167 


476 | 


Salisbury 


°143 


84 


340 I 


Bowie 


104 


110 


327 | 



State Average 

Teachers r Number of 

College College El em. Total 

at Students Pupilst Cost 



1942-43 COST PEE TEACHERS COLLEGE STUDENT 
TOTAL COST OF INSTRUCTION PER STUDENT 

MBMl Total cost ■ 



Pai d by 
State W//A Student 




State 
Teachers 
College 
at 

Towson 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 

Bowie 



Resident 
Students 
Average *Per 
Number Cent 



TOTAL COST PER RESIDENT STUDENT 
Total Cost 



Pai d by 
State WM Student 



110 38 
48 41 

52 36 



Total 
Cost 

$891 | 
763 
730 



473 






459 





103 



99 



547 E 



° Each cadet teacher is counted as one-half a student. 

f Not considered in calculating cost per college student. Elementary pupils were fol- 
lowing percent of college enrollment in 1943 : Towson, 79 ; Frostburg, 147 ; Salisbury, 59 ; 
Bowie, 106. 

* Percent that resident students were of total college enrollment. 

TABLE 131— Inventories at State Teachers Colleges and State 
Department of Education, June, 1943 



School or Department 



Land and 
Improve- 
ments 



Buildings 



Eauipment 



Total 



Towson State Teachers College. . . 
Frostburg State Teachers College. 
Salisbury State Teachers College. 
Bowie State Teachers College. . . . 
*State Department of Education. . 
Teachers' Retirement System .... 
Vocational Rehabilitation 



$127,970 
80,590 
17,872 
15,246 



$1,306,500 
354,718 
700,046 
453,106 



$212,541 
46,996 
96,590 
79,617 
20,481 
6,239 
1,452 



$1,647,011 
482,304 
814,508 
547,969 
20,481 
6,239 
1,452 



* Includes Vocational Education, Physical Education and Bureau of Educational Measurements. 



190 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 132 

Contributions by Teachers to the Annuity Savings Fund of the Teachers' 
Retirement System of the State of Maryland for the Year Ended July 31, 
1943, Number and Percent of October, 1943, County Teaching Staff Who 
Are Members in Active Service 



County or Institution 



County: 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Trince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Total Counties 

Teachers Colleges: 

Towson 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 

Bowie 

Department: 

Education 

Library 

Retirement 

National Defense Training Program 

Other Schools: 

Maryland Training School for Boys 

Montrose School for Girls 

Maryland Training School for Colored Girls 

Rosewood State Training School 

Maryland School for the Deaf 

Total Schools and Departments 

Grand Total 



Amount Contri- 
buted Year 
Ending July 31, 
1943 



Members in 
Active Service 
October, 1943 



Number 



$32,291.78 


430 


88.8 


25,349.04 


338 


86.0 


45,290.42 


546 


83.2 


3,977.35 


59 


85.5 


6,600.22 


93 


■ 88.6 


14,365.92 


203 


91.9 


10,522.96 


131 


83.4 


6,394 


22 


90 


72.6 


8,802.78 


122 


78.7 


19,207.95 


261 


93.9 


9,031 


43 


128 


83.1 


14,317.60 


215 


91.5 


7,456 


63 


108 


93 1 


4,994.91 


75 


92 ".6 


41,523.49 


*455 


81 


36,785.53 


441 


70 '.9 


6,025.63 


76 


88.4 


4,316 


77 


58 


69.9 


7,227 


07 


102 


87.9 


6,357 


64 


90 


89.1 


28,319.96 


369 


92.0 


10,821.40 


162 


88.5 


7,397 


73 


111 


93.3 


$357,378 


43 


4,663 


84.8 


6,099 


74 


44 


93.6 


2,204 


01 


16 


69.7 


2,178 


43 


15 


83.3 


1,369 


29 


16 


84.2 


5,144 


27 


32 


100.0 


443 


02 


6 


100.0 


302 


00 


2 


100.0 


627 


93 


6 


100.0 


1,726 


31 


14 




904 


71 


9 




405 


66 


7 




1,292 


94 


11 




2,025 


01 


23 




24,723.32 


201 




$382,101 


75 


4,864 





* Includes 40 who were not enrolled until November although they were in service in October. 



Membership and Contributions Teachers Retirement System; 191 
Services of Library Commission to County Schools 



TABLE 133 



Services of Maryland Public Library Commission to Maryland County 
Schools for White Pupils by Year 





Total Number 
Supplied 


Traveling Libraries 
(30-35 Books in Each) 


Package Libraries 
(1-12 Books in Each) 


Year 
Ending June 30 








Supplied to 




Supplied to 




Volumes 


Pictures 


No. 


Schools 


Teachers 


No. 


Schools 


Teachers 



White Elementary Schools 



12,022 
9,799 

16,606 
8,609 
8,675 
7,029 
8,255 
5,577 
4,258 
4,249 
3,751 
2,894 
1,934 



569 
1,814 
574 
288 



299 


157 


196 


393 


89 


124 


275 


165 


206 


266 


79 


84 


419 


182 


275 


334 


87 


112 


225 


96 


128 


210 


91 


107 


219 


81 


144 


247 


77 


88 


184 


66 


80 


150 


46 


56 


207 


44 


52 


237 


56 


73 


133 


39 


43 


199 


47 


52 


92 


26 


31 


279 


66 


82 


86 


22 


25 


375 


64 


75 


69 


17 


21 


353 


56 


75 


62 


10 


12 


207 


44 


56 


46 


10 


11 


112 


37 


40 



White High Schools 



1931. 
1932. 
1933. 
1934. 
1935. 
1936. 
1937. 
1938. 
1939. 
1940. 
1941. 
1942. 
1943. 



3,236 
4,562 
6,266 
4,148 
6,172 
3,723 
3,082 
3,937 
3,208 
5,076 
5,432 
3,791 
2,508 



323 
125 
180 
27 



77 


31 


47 


125 


27 


32 


105 


31 


48 


189 


49 


54 


148 


35 


45 


331 


47 


57 


91 


35 


39 


324 


37 


63 


148 


42 


79 


338 


48 


67 


95 


31 


46 


134 


24 


29 


61 


18 


21 


281 


37 


48 


54 


16 


17 


405 


35 


37 


51 


11 


11 


284 


26 


28 


37 


13 


13 


809 


37 


46 


35 


13 


13 


828 


43 


48 


32 


12 


12 


679 


35 


35 


25 


11 


11 


326 


29 


30 



Taking advantage of better discounts and assistance in selecting, eight 
white elementary, nine white high schools and one county board of education 
purchased library books through the Library Commission. As an aid to 
book selection the Commission now maintains a collection of graded books 
for school libraries, so that teachers may have an opportunity to examine 
books selected before purchasing. 

Reading certificates were issued to pupils reading eight or more books 
approved by the Library Commission. The purpose of this activity is to 
encourage the reading of better books by young people. The awarding of 
certificates is optional with the teacher. In 1942-43 reading certificates were 
issued to 72 elementary school children. The number of books read by 
elementary school pupils totalled 1,206. 

A bookmobile covers Talbot County in four different routes: 1 — 
Claiborne, Tilghman, Sherwood, Wittman, Neavitt, and Bozman; 2 — Trappe, 
Trappe Station, and Oxford; 3 — Unionville, Tunis Mills, Royal Oak, and 
St. Michaels; 4 — Longwoods, Newton, Wye Mills, Jarrelltown, Cordova, 
and Matthewstown. On these routes 26 schools are visited and 17 deposit 
stations for adults. The branch in the Cordova School is a very active one, 
serving both school and community. 



192 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



O N H CO' 



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Services of Library Commission to County Schools 



193 



TABLE 135 

Services of Maryland Public Library Advisory Commission to the County 
Colored Schools, 1942-43 





Total Number 
Supplied 


Travelling Libraries 
(30 to 35 Books in Each) 


Package Libraries 
(1 to 12 Books in Each) 


County 


Vol- 
umes 


Pic- 
tures 


Num- 
ber 


Supplied to 


Num- 
ber 


Supplied to 




Schools 


Teach- 
ers 


Schools 


Teach- 
ers 



Colored Elementary Schools 



Total 


167 


3 


1 


l 


i 


31 


7 


7 


Baltimore 


2 










l 






Calvert 


56 










15 






Harford 


8 










4 






Howard 


40 




i 


i 


i 


1 






St. Mary's 


25 










5 






2 










1 






Somerset 


34 


3 








4 







Colored High Schools 



Total 


120 


10 


2 


1 


2 


12 


5 


6 


Baltimore 


78 




2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


Calvert 


3 










1 


1 


1 




3 










2 


1 


2 


Howard 




io 
















16 










4 


i 


i 


Wicomico 


20 










4 


l 


l 



In addition to school libraries books are available to colored children and adults through the 
following public libraries or branches: 



Allegany — Cumberland Public Library 

Anne Arundel — Clay Street School. Annapolis 

County library lends to colored schools 
Baltimore 

Catonsville Colored School (branch) 

Sparrows Point Public Library 

Towson Public Library 

Turner School — branch of Dundalk 
Dorchester — Cambridge Public Library 
Frederick — C. Burr Artz Library in Frederick 

lends books to colored schools 



Howard — County library lends on request 
Montgomery — River Road School (branch of 
Bethesda) 

Silver Spring lends to schools 
Rockville lends to schools 
Talbot — County library has branches in colored 
schools 

Washington — County library lends collections 
of books on request 



Crossroads and Brown's Woods Schools in Anne Arundel, 
each received $24 from the Rosenwald Fund toward the pur- 
chase of an elementary school library. Gravelly Hill School in 
Harford received $20 from the Fund toward a $30 elementary 
school library. 



194 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE 136— Estimated Cost of Health Service to Public School Children 
in Maryland Counties from October 1, 1942 to June 30, 1943 



County 


Number of 


Es- 
timated 
Budget 

Affecting 
Public 
School 

Children 


Percent from 


He 
Offi 

Full 

Time 


alth 
cers 

Part 
Time 


Nurses 


Clerks 


Other* 


State 
Aid 


Federal 
Aid 


County 
Levy 


All Counties. . . . 


24 


15 


1 9Q 


A.A 
44 


1 Oft 
loU 


t$229,168 


O 1 . D 


21 . 9 


40 . 5 


Allegany 


2 






2 




21,215 


OK K 

oo . o 


12 . 1 


52 . 4 


Anne Arundel . . . 


\ 




19 


5 


1 7 
1 1 


17,808 




ao Q 
o_ . o 


1 A 9 




3 




13 


5 


1U 


27,968 


1 i _ 


ft 1 


76 . 7 








2 




c 

o 


4,390 


KQ A 
Oo . 4 


9/1 Q 


21 . 7 


Caroline 


1 




3 




q 
o 


5,072 


Ol . 1 


19 9 


26 . 1 




\ 


14 


2 


I 


Q 

o 


5,453 


A(\ fl 
4U . o 


OU . 1 


23 . 5 




\ 




3 




q 


8,699 


A 1 1 


on c; 


28 . 4 




1 




3 


I 


c 
O 


8,484 


A r. £ 


50 . 


4 . 4 








2 




c 
O 


6,906 


fil »7 


19 . 1 


19 . 2 




1 




5 


1 


4 


10,426 


30.5 


45.5 


24.0 








5 


1 


5 


5,434 


51.6 


17.9 


30.5 


Harford 


i 




2 


2 


2 


7,448 


37.8 


25.8 


36.4 


Howard 






1 ' 


1 


2 


2,963 


37.8 


14.4 


47.8 


Kent 


i 




3 


1 


2 


6,269 


54.9 


15.1 


30.0 


Montgomery 


l 




16 


5 


11 


26,182 


26.8 


9.8 


63.4 


Prince George's. 


l 




7 


3 


10 


12,958 


30.2 


17.4 


52.4 


Queen Anne's. . . 


l 




2 


1 


5 


3,836 


63.4 


12.3 


24.3 




l 




3 


1 


3 


4,460 


65.4 


25.7 


8.9 


Somerset 


l 


i 


3 


2 


2 


5,051 


53.8 


8.9 


37.3 


Talbot 


l 




2 


1 


1 


5,286 


45.1 


30.7 


24.2 


Washington ... 


l 




5 


3 


9 


14,213 


41.5 


19.4 


39.1 


Wicomico 


l 




6 


2 


3 


10,815 


55.5 


14.1 


30.4 


Worcester 


l 




5 


1 


10 


7,832 


48.0 


13.6 


38.4 



* Includes 31 sanitary inspectors; bacteriologists, technicians, laboratory helpers in branch 
bacteriological laboratories; physicians and janitors in venereal disease clinics. 

t Includes one-half of State funds for general purposes ($123,552.64), services for crippled children 
($26,504.03), and branch laboratories ($22,551.33); one-half of Federal funds for U.S. Public Health 
Service Title VI ($43,841.46), services for crippled children ($39,664.29), and branch laboratories 
($16,775.46) ; one-half county expenditures from which Board of Education contributions have been 
deducted ($185,445.93). Expenditures for venereal disease control ($33,973.95), maternal and child 
health ($68,338.41), and contributions paid by other agencies ($24,932.40) have been excluded. 



TABLE 137— School Dental Clinics Conducted Under the Auspices of 
Maryland State Department of Health, August 1, 1942 - July 31, 1943 



County 


Number of 
Clinicians 


Time 
Given 

to 
Serv- 
i ce* 


Number of 
Children 


Number of 


Ex- 
amined 

Dentist 


Treated 


Fillings 
Inserted 


Teeth 
Ex- 
tracted 


Clean- 
ings 


Treat- 
ments 


Total 
Opera- 
tions 


Total 


17 




19,602 


5,689 


12,362 


8,593 


2,193 


6,035 


29,183 


Allegany 




Full 


3 , 283 


1,450 


658 


3,681 


409 


1,874 


6,622 


Anne Arundel .... 




Part 


580 


321 


388 


509 


35 





932 


Baltimore 




Part 


3,041 


550 


2,406 


400 


229 


783 


3,818 


Calvert 




Part 


110 


96 


160 


77 


2 


4 


243 


Carroll 




Half 


163 


163 


1,212 


553 





85 


1,850 


Harford 




Part 


54 


53 


100 


73 


60 





223 


Howard 




Half 


559 


131 


313 


252 


32 


19 


616 


Montgomery 




Full 


6,691 


851 


2,619 


864 


3 


1,333 


4,819 


Prince George's. . 




Part 


880 


709 


922 


350 


144 


14 


1,430 


Talbot 




Half 


966 


164 


401 


85 


165 


75 


726 


Washington 




fPull 


254 


116 


238 


125 


94 


24 


481 


Wicomico 




Half 


1,877 


598 


1,794 


934 


598 


881 


4,207 






Half 


1,644 


487 


1,151 


690 


432 


943 


3,216 



* The scope of service varies from full-time and half-time service to "part-time," meaning one 
or more one-day clinics per month. t Full-time clinician served only a few months. 



Services of State and County Health Offices to 195 
Public School Children 



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196 



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Financial Statements — State Public School Budget, 197 
Teachers Colleges 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1943 



Source or Purpose 


State 
Department 
of Education 


Towson 
State Teachers 
College 


Frostburg 
State Teachers 
College 


Sa 'sbury 
State Teachers 
College 


Bowie 
State Teachers 
College 


Receipts 


State Appropriation 

Students' Fees 

Transfers by Budget Amendment 

Other Receipts to Budget Items 


$64,374.00 

2,040.86 
25.65 


$143,809.00 
a58,481.38 
Ml, 000.00 
8,242.60 


$48,180.00 
22,416.18 
b3, 100.00 
37.54 


$52,532.00 
24,772.30 
b3, 500.00 
1,903.61 


$41,025.00 
15,980.47 
b6,625.00 
572.73 


$66,440.51 


$221,532.98 


$73,733.72 


$82,707.91 


$64,203.20 



Disbursements 



Salaries, Wages, and Special Payments 

General Repairs 

Motor Vehicle Repairs 

Light Heat. Power and Water 

Travel 

Transportation 

Communication 

Printing other than Office Supplies. . . 

All Other Contractual Services 

Food 

Forage and Veterinary Supplies 

Fuel 

Office Supplies 

Medical and Laboratory Supplies 

Laundry, Cleaning and Disinfecting. . 

Refr'geration Supplies 

Educational, Vocational, and Recrea-. 
tional Supplies 

Agricultural and Botanical Supplies . . . 

Motor Vehicle Supplies 

Power Plant Supplies 

Wearing Apparel 

Household Supplies 

All Other Supplies 

Building Materials 

Plumbing Materials . 

Electrical Materials 

Painting Materials 

Motor Vehicle Equipment Material . . . 

Materials for Equipment 

Highway Materials 

Sewer and Water Materials 

All Other Materials 

Office Equipment 

Household Equipment 

Medical and Laboratory Equipment. . 

Agricultural and Botanical Equipment 

Motor Vehicle Equipment 

Educational, Vocational, and Recrea- 
tional Equipment 

Tools and Machinery 

All Other Equipment 

Rent 

Insurance 

All Other Fixed Charges 

Structures 

Total Disbursements 

Transfers by Budget Amendment 

Refunds of Students' Fees 

Unexpended Balance Returned to 
State Treasury 

Grand Total 



$39,149.64 
13.75 
511.11 

' '2,899 '.i7 
61.07 
2,625.11 

202! 80 



1,214.08 



174.46 

987! 53 



52.40 



305.90 



980.86 
18.26 



163.00 
6.45 



$49,365.59 
$3,700.00 

13,374.92 



$66,440.51 



$140,731.26 
11,508.91 
313.35 
4,602.50 
28.77 
31.72 
1,502.92 
892.71 
374.62 
20,712.47 
379.38 
9,102.42 
750.03 
131.80 
916.30 
90.68 

2,082.05 
93.29 

354.11 
91.50 

126.39 
1,678.19 
20.16 

598.33 
39.94 
26.83 

699 . 89 

499.97 
48.81 



286.75 
246.49 



10.50 



3,025.89 
'2,'489.3i 



372.76 
115.50 



$204,976.50 

253! 66 
16,303.48 



$221,532.98 



$54,986.28 
1,125.84 
37.75 
1,251.54 
235.19 
9.27 
347.46 
94.87 
589.99 
5,747.96 

" ' i i 569 '. 89 
69.06 
41.36 
35.43 



661.17 
17.50 
99.77 
74.47 

354I io 

36.15 
26.75 

i2'.40 
194.74 



119.90 
351.88 
153.42 



2,157.76 
17.18 



56.27 



$70,475.35 

292.59 
2,965.78 



$73,733.72 



$54,100.75 
459.07 
278.92 
1,841.02 
428.84 



609 


04 


ou . 0- 
376.02 


125 


35 


28.07 


838 


91 


114.75 


5,088 


75 


11,267.84 






48.79 


3,446 


26 


3,300.87 


224 


32 


112.00 


384 


48 


69.15 


100 


61 


436.86 






50.00 


547 


85 


1,145.74 






89.49 


159 


12 


659.97 


1 


30 





298.01 
4.85 
122.34 
16.70 
1.74 
47.28 
4.02 
19.67 



1.37 
3.91 
122.00 
62.35 
256.42 



1,146.29 
1.81 



82.44 



$70,825.79 

"ii587l59 
10,294.53 



$82,707.91 



a Includes $4,764.88 received for faculty board and $200 for rent of cottage.. 

b Includes amounts transferred from Public Schools to aid in making up deficits in students' fees as follows: Towson — ■ 
$6,000; Frostburg— $3,100; Salisbury— $3,500: Bowie — $2,200. 



198 



1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1943 



Source or Purpose 



rt o 

.2 S 

ora 
> 



§1 
111 

DO 3 o 
Ph 



3 « 2 
rt w » 



Receipts 



co 

O 0) 

'5i o 03 



State Appropriation 


$15,850.00 


$11,000.00 


$19,600.00 


$9,600.00 


$4,000.00 


Receipts (including transfers 








by budget amendment) . . . 


al6,194.94 


b7,085.63 




340.02 


cl,200.00 


Total Receipts 


$32,044.94 


$18,085.63 


$19,600.00 


$9,940.02 


$5,200.00 



Disbursement 



Salaries, Wages and Special 
Payments 

General Repairs 

Motor Vehicle Repairs 

Travel 

Transportation 

Communication 

Other Contractual Services. , 

Office Supplies 

Educational, Vocational, and 
Recreational Supplies 

Motor Vehicle Supplies 

All Other Supplies 

Office Equipment 

Educational, Vocational, and 
Recreational Equipment. . 

Rent 

Insurance 

All Other Fixed Charges 



Total Disbursements . . 

Returned to State 
Treasury 

Transferred by Budget 
Amendment 



Grand Total . 



$14,304.77 


$14,158.15 


$6,150.50 
5.50 
46.55 
753.43 
3.98 
292.96 


16.40 
d2,797.81 


16.00 
2,659.52 


432.35 
d7,968.28 
292.65 

497.58 
176.80 


333.75 


176.62 

120.59 
519.45 


149.97 

296.33 
214.97 
536.25 


209.90 

d3.427.82 
402.30 
6.50 


10.00 

11.46 
80.00 


56.22 






10.00 
$8,516.66 

3,752.46 
7,330.88 
$19,600.00 


$30,533.16 
1,511.78 


$18,085.54 
.09 


$32,044.94 


$18,085.63 



$6,525.00 



7.81 
1,179.71 



51.00 
1.50 



$7,765.02 
2,175.00 



$9,940.02 



$4,000.00 
' 645! 58 



$4,645.58 
e554.42 

$5,200.00 



a Includes $5,045.81 from Federal Funds, 
b Includes $6,306.48 from Federal Funds, 
c From General Education Board. 

d Includes transpoptation, tuition, and equipment for trainees, 
e Unused travel allowance refunded to General Education Board. 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTS AT STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 
For Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1943 





Towson 


Frostburg 


Bowie 


Purpose 


State Teachers 


State Teachers 


State Teachers 




College 


College 


College 


Receipts 



Bonds authorized in 1939 


$100,000.00 
51,000.00 


$100,000.00 


$ 


Bonds authorized in 1941 


30,000.00 






$151,000.00 


$100,000.00 


$30,000.00 





DlSlU'KSEMENTS 



Advf-rtising for bids 

Architects' fees 

Const ruction 

Equipment 

Total Disbursements 
Balance to 1944 

Grand Total 



$18.60 


$ 


$6.60 


8,261.81 


2,264.15 


501 .89 


137,332.27 




13,450.96 


4 , 080 . 83 




3,733.20 


$149,693.51 


$2,264.15 


$17,692.65 


1,306.49 


97,735.85 


12,307.35 


$151 ,000.00 


$100,000.00 


$30,000.00 



Financial Statements; Number of Schools 



199 



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202 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE III 

Number of Pupils and Teachers in Catholic Elementary and Secondary Schools 
in Maryland Counties, Year Ending June 30, 1943 



County and School 



Enrollment 



County and School 



Enrollment 



Allegany 
*S. S. Peter's and Paul's, 

Cumberland 

*St. Patrick's, Catholic Girls' 
Central High, Cumberland.. 

*St. Mary's, Cumberland 

St. Michael's, Frostburg 

*La Salle Institute, Cumberland . 

St. Patrick s, Mt. Savage 

St. Peter's, Westernport 

St. Joseph's, Midland 

Total (8) 

Anne Arundel 

St. Mary's, Annapolis 

St. Mary's (Colored), Annapolis 

Baltimore 
*School of the Immaculate and 
Catholic High, Towson 

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, 

Middle River 

♦Loyola High, Towson 

St. Michael's, Overlea 

St. Mark's, Catonsville 

St. Ursula's, Parkville 

St. Clement's, Rosedale 

*St. Stephen's, Bradshaw 

St. Rita's, Dundalk 

St. Joseph's, Fullerton 

St. Charles', Pikesville 

Ascension, Halethorpe 

♦St. Charles' College, Catonsville 

St. Agnes', Woodlawn 

St. Clement's, Lansdowne 

Mt. de Sales, Catonsville 

St. Joseph's, Texas 

St. Vincent's Orphanage, 

Towson 

Total (18) 



471 

324 
344 
282 

159 
137 



1,813 



321 
80 



492 

305 
298 
291 
270 
204 
259 
242 
220 
206 

162 
158 
17 

85 



79 



117 



191 
60 



41 



3,656 



18 



500 



206 



490 



5S 



176 



85 



1,015 



76 



15 



127 
8 
8 
5 
5 
7 
5 
5 
9 
7 

13 
5 
5 

11 
3 

5 

151 



Calvert 

Our Lady Star of the Sea, 
Solomon's 

Caroline 

St. Gertrude's Academy, 

Ridgely 

Carroll 

*St. John's, Westminster 

St. Joseph's, Taneytown 

Total (2) 

Cecil 

Immaculate Conception, Elkton. 

Charles 

*Sacred Heart, La Plata 

*St. Mary's, Notre Dame High, 
Bryantown 

Total (2) 

St. Mary's (Colored), Bryantown 

Frederick 

*St. John's, Frederick 

St. Euphemia's, Emmitsburg. . . . 

St. Anthony's, Emmitsburg 

*St. Joseph's College High, Em- 
mitsburg 

Visitation, Frederick 

St. Peter's, Libertytown 

Total (6) 

St. Euphemia's (Colored), Em- 
mitsburg 

Garrett 

St. Peter's, Oakland 

Harford 

St. Margaret's, Bel Air 



46 



24 



142 

32 



174 

108 

202 
134 



336 
134 



159 
167 
127 



510 
4 

64 

105 



18 



43 



111 

39 



193 



13 



* Secondary school accredited by the Maryland State Board of Education. 



Enrollment in Catholic Schools 



203 



TABLE III— (Continued) 

Number of Pupils in Catholic Elementary and Secondary Schools 
in Maryland Counties, Year Ending June 30, 1943 



County and School 



Enrollment 



County and School 



Enrollment 



HOWARD 

St. Paul's, Ellicott City 

Trinity, Ilchester 

St. Augustine's, Elkridge 

St. Louis', Clarksville 

Total (4) 

St. Augustine's (Col.), Ellicott 
City 

Montgomery 

St. Michael's, Silver Spring 

Our Lady of Lourdes, Bethesda . 
Academy of the Holy Name, 

Silver Spring 

♦Georgetown Preparatory, Garrett 

Park 

St. Martin's, Gaithersburg 

Total (5) 

Prince George's 

St. James', Mt. Rainier 

Holy Redeemer, Berwyn 

*St. Mildred's, Laurel 

St. Mary's, Upper Marlboro. . . . 
*La Salle Hall, Ammendale 

Total (5) 

St. Mary's (Col.), Upper Marl- 
boro 

St. Mary's 

*St. Michael's, Ridge 

St. Mary's Academy, Leonard- 
town 

St. Joseph's, Morganza 

Little Flower, Great Mills 

St. John's, Hollywood 

Holy Angels, Abell 

Our Lady, Medley's Neck 

Leonard Hall, Leonardtown 

Sacred Heart, Bushwood 

Total (9) 



146 
61 



73 



369 
61 



488 
323 



36 
129 



976 



407 
268 
179 
67 



921 
74 

173 

137 
204 
170 
154 
150 
117 
116 
103 



58 



81 



155 
115 



58 



11 



270 



77 



76 
106 



31 



1,324 



182 



St. Peter Claver's (Col.), 

Ridge 

St. Joseph's (Col.), Morganza 

Total (Col.) (2) 



190 

89 



Washington 
♦St. Mary's, Hagerstown. 



All Maryland Counties 
White Catholic Schools (66) . 
Colored Catholic Schools (7) 

Baltimore City 

♦Seton 

*Mt. St. Joseph's 

♦Institute of Notre Dame. . . 

♦Catholic High 

♦Calvert Hall 

♦Notre Dame of Maryland. . 

♦Mt. St. Agnes 

Mt. Washington Country 

Visitation 

Calvert Hall Country 



279 
312 



11,059 
632 



29 
244 



161 

78 
155 
66 
43 



171 



Total (10) 



♦St. Martin's 

50 Other White Parish Schools 
4 Institutions for White 
Children 



776 



953 
24,038 



337 



81 



2,540 



,078 



518 
758 



221 
180 



374 

25 



4,174 
132 



Total White (65) 



♦St. Francis' Academy. . . . 

3 Colored Parish Schools. . . . 

4 Institutions for Colored 
Children 



26,104 

83 
1,007 

163 



399 



4,306 
141 

13 



Total Colored (8) 



Entire State 
White (131) . 
Colored (15). 



1,253 



37,163 
1,885 



570 



154 



6,846 
154 



♦ Secondary school accredited by the Maryland State Board of Education. 



204 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



TABLE IV 

Number of Pupils and Teachers in Non-Catholic Private Elementary and Secondary 
Schools in Maryland Counties, Year Ending June 30, 1943 



County and School 



Enroll- 
ment 



Ele- 
men- 
tary 



Sec- 
ond- 
ary 



No. OF 
Teachers 



Full- 
time 



Part- 
time 



County and School 



Enroll- 



Ele- 
men- 
tary 



Sec- 
ond- 
ary 



No. OP 
Teachers 



Full- 
time 



Allegan y 

Wadded, Cumberland 

Anne Arundel 
♦Severn, Severna Park. 
Cochran-Bryan, Annapolis. . 

Holladay, Annapolis 

tAnnapolis Nursery and Kin- 
dergarten 

Primary School, U. S. Naval 

Academy 

Thomas, Annapolis 

Total (6) 

Baltimore 
*McDonogh 

Garrison Forest, Garrison. . . 

Hannah More Academy, 
Reisterstown 

St. Timothy's, Catonsville . . 

Greenwood, Ruxton 

°Crosby, Catonsville 

°Blae Bird, Ruxton 

Oldfields, Glencoe 

fPlayground, Pinehurst Road 
xLutherville Kindergarten . . . . 
JGreen Spring Valley Play 

School 

xHarf ord Park Kindergarten . 

Crestmont, Stevenson 

Total (13) 

Cecil 

♦Jacob Tome Institute, Port 
Deposit 

♦West Nottingham Academy, 

Colora 

Seventh Day Adventist, 
Perry ville 

Total (3) 



x24 



39 

t37 

26 
13 



115 



345 
56 

19 

15 
°69 
°67 

t27 
x24 

U9 
xl7 
3 



661 

288 
18 
20 



♦108 
75 



183 



♦267 
109 

77 
91 
61 



52 



658 

♦98 
♦63 
7 



24 



139 

11 
10 

2 



15 



326 



168 



28 



Montgomery 

Columbia Jr. College, Ta- 

koma Park 

Landon (Boys), Edgemoor. . . 
Countryside, Silver Spring. . . 
Chevy Chase Country, 17 

Grafton St 

♦Bullis, Silver Spring 

Longfellow (Boys), Bethesda. 

°Green Acres, Bethesda 

Slade, Olney 

Chevy Chase Jr. College. . . . 
Lady Isabel, Edgemoor Lane . 

Total (10) 

Prince George's 

Briarley Military Academy, 

Ammendale 

Avondale Country, Laurel.. . 
xMrs. Ballinger's Nursery, 

Riverdale 

Hillside Seventh Day Ad- 
ventist, Laurel 

Total (4) 

Queen anne's 

Gunston, Centerville 

Seventh Day Adventist, 
Grason ville 

Total (2) 

St. Mary's 

♦Charlotte Hall 

♦St. Mary's Female Seminary, 
St. Mary's City 

Total (2) 

Talbot 
tCountry, Easton 

Washington 

St. James', Hagerstown 

°Miss Hoffmeier's, Hagerstown 
Hagerstown Church School. . 

Total (3) 

WlCCMICO 

Mrs. Herold's, Salisbury 

Total County White (46) — 



169 
156 
97 

94 

81 
°53 
41 

°25 



716 



x20 
4 



121 

14 

3 



20 
t45 



63 

16 
2,124 



246 
79 



39 



461 



21 



11 

♦120 
♦40 



160 



60 



60 



,722 



* Secondary school accredited by Maryland State ° Includes nursery school and kindergarten. 
Board of Education. t Nursery school and kindergarten only, 

z Kindf-rgarten only. t Nursery school only. 



Enrollment in Non-Catholio Non-Public Schools 



205 



TABLE IV— (Continued) 



Number of Pupils and Teachers in Non-Catholic Private Elementary and 
Secondary Schools in Baltimore City, Year Ending June 30, 1943 









Number op 




Enrollment 


Teachers 


School 










Elemen- 




Full- 


Part- 




tary 


Secondary 


time 


time 


Friends, 5114 N. Charles St 


J261 


131 


29 


10 


Park School, 3025 Liberty Heights Ave 


J211 


81 


28 


3 


Bryn Mawr, (Girls), West Melrose Ave 


fl70 


118 


20 


6 




1"143 


120 


22 


5 


Roland Park Country (Girls), 817 W. University 










3:171 


91 


21 


9 




f256 


• • 


20 






f239 


14 


18 


3 


St.Paul's School (Boys), 2101 W. Rogers Ave 


130 


112 


9 


4 




66 


65 


11 


2 




115 




3 




Homewood, 4906 Roland Ave 


till 




15 




Whitmore Nursery, Liberty Heights and 










§97 




3 


2 


Salvation Army Day Nursery, 242 S. Patterson 












J86 




8 


4 


Girl's Latin, 10 Club Road 


16 


63 


7 


7 


Nursery and Child Study Home, 721 












J72 




2 


1 


*Samuel Ready (Girls), 5100 Old Frederick Road 


41 


*29 


4 




Kornerstone Kindergarten, Lafayette and Bolton St. . 


x62 




3 


i 


Hamilton Nursery, 3005 Hamilton Ave 


§58 




1 


3 


Miss Crater's Country, 3524 Meadowside Road 


f49 




4 






34 


6 


3 






§40 




2 


2 


Jewish Educational Alliance, 1216 E. Baltimore St.. . 


§40 




2 


2 


Cathedral Kindergarten, University Parkway 












xx36 




3 




Happy Day Nursery, 507 Dunkirk Road 


§32 




2 


i 


Walbrook Memorial School Center, Gwynns Falls 










Parkway and Longwouu St 


§28 




2 


l 




§26 




3 


l 




§25 




3 






§25 




4 






§25 




2 




Matthews, Brightside Road 


J22 




3 




Cloverdale, 2235 Linden Ave 


J15 




2 






tl3 




4 


'i 




§13 




1 




Clifton Day Nursery, 2628 Harford Ave 


§12 




2 




Mt. Washington Nursery, 2411 Rogers Ave 


§12 






i 


Garden School, 1525 Bolton St 


12 




i 




Epiphany Kindergarten, Arlington Ave. and 










Old York Road 


*8 






2 




2,772 


830 


267 


71 


School for Colored Pupils 








Seventh Day Adventist, Harlem Ave. and 










Dolphin St 


55 


16 


3 


1 



* Secondary School accredited by Maryland State Board of Education, 
t Includes Kindergarten, 
j Includes Nursery School and Kindergarten, 
xx Nursery school and kindergarten only. 
§ Nursery school only, 
x Kindergarten only. 



206 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 

TABLE V 



Number of Pupils Reported Enrolled in Maryland Non-Public Elementary and 
Secondary Schools, for the Year Ending June 30, 1943 



County 


White 


Colored 


Number 
of 

Schools 


Enrollment 


Number 
of 

Teachers 


Number 
of 

Schools 


Enrollment 


Number 
of 

Teachers 


Elemen- 
tary 


Com- 
mer- 
cial 


Second- 
ary 


Elemen- 
tary 


Second- 
ary 


"{"Catholic Parish and Private Institutions 


Allegany 


8 


1,813 


41 


500 


76 










Anne Arundel 


1 


321 






8 


"i 


"80 




'"2 




18 


3,656 


" i3 


1,015 


151 










Calvert 


1 


46 


6 


16 


5 










Caroline 


1 


24 




10 


8 










Carroll 


2 


174 




29 


13 










Cecil 


1 


108 






3 


. ... 








Charles 


2 


336 




' '86 


14 




i34 






Frederick 


6 


510 


' 37 


193 


50 


l 


4 




\ 


Garrett 


1 


64 






4 










Harford 


1 


105 






3 


... 








Howard 


4 


369 




' si 


31 




' ei 




"2 


Montgomery 


5 


976 


' 58 


270 


56 


... 










5 


921 


11 


77 


35 




' 74 




' ' 2 


St. Mary's 


9 


1,324 


5 


182 


49 


2 


279 




7 


Washington 


1 


312 




81 


19 










Total Counties 


66 


11,059 


171 


2,540 


525 


7 


632 




17 


Baltimore City 


65 


26,104 


399 


4,306 


893 


8 


1,253 


i54 


65 


Total State 


131 


37,163 


570 


6,846 


1,418 


15 


1,885 


154 


82 



*Non-Catholic Private Schools 



Allegany 


1 


24 
















Anne Arundel 


6 


115 




183 


25 










Baltimore 


13 


661 




658 


154 










Cecil 


3 


326 




168 


30 










Montgomery 


10 


716 




461 


101 












4 


121 




21 


18 












2 


17 




11 


6 










St. Mary's 


2 


20 




160 


16 










Talbct 


1 


45 






8 










Washington 


3 


63 




' 60 


14 












1 


16 
















Total Counties 


46 


2,124 




1,722 


374 










Baltimore City 


37 


2,772 




830 


338 




' 55 


' 16 


" ' * 4 


Total State 


82 


4,896 




2,552 


712 


1 


55 


16 


4 



♦Schools for Atypical Children 



Cheltenham 


146 






5 










Children's Rehabilitation Institute. . . . 


68 




' ' 7 


8 










Maryland School for the Deaf 


152 




12 


18 










Maryland School for the Blind 


59 




12 


18 




' 27 


' 3 


' "5 


Dept for Colored Deaf 












52 




7 


Maryland Training School for Boys. . . 


250 




' ' 6 


' 9 










Maryland Training School for Colored 


















Girls 












73 


3 


2 




' 64 




' 33 


' '4 










Open Air School, State Sanitorium 


42 






1 










Bernhardt School for Deaf Children. . . 


14 






3 










Rosewood State Training School 


200 






10 











t Figure! furnished by Rev. John I. Barrett, Superintendent of Catholic Schools. 
* Figures furnished by principals of schools. 



Enrollment in Non-Public Schools; Average Number 207 
Belonging Public Schools 



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Disbursements for White Elementary and High Schools 221 



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222 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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$156,065.63 
10,992.56 


14,147.98 

4.00 
9.00 


13.00 


135.00 
3,013.25 


3,148.25 


165.81 


165.81 


89.64 


89.64 














$2,340,476.54 

164,548.09 
10 701.51 
335,'589.'59 


610,839.19 

5,707.69 
9,313.96 


15,021.65 

42,148.55 
46,353.68 
4**8 477 81 


527,480.06 

4,120.79 
21,660.77 


25,781.56 

15,326.53 
82,132.96 


97,459.49 

12,846.01 
7,825.90 
74,279.45 


94,951.36 

1,810.35 

8,875.22 


10,685.57 


sapua3v 


$177,726.67 

787.01 
30,349.03 


49,645.29 

836.40 
460.30 


1,296.70 

5,700.64 
2 184.49 
26|836!81 


34,721.94 

127.27 
1,373.15 


1,500.42 

3,213.85 
11,290.04 


14,503.89 

1,837.07 
1 349 47 
ll!608!21 


14,794.75 

384.72 
1,740.51 


CM 

LO 

CM 

cm" 


-UIBJ\T 


$57,181.00 

A A(\A QA 

360.42 
12,047.72 


16,813.08 

170.84 
667.85 


838.69 

461.33 
489.46 
6,997!85 


7,948.64 

115.22 
406.17 


521.39 

278.10 
3,501.68 


3,779.78 

244.78 
136.42 
2,167!06 


2,548.26 

11.12 
106.68 


117.80 


uopBJado 


$190,512.59 

18 T01 04 
994.22 
31,230.92 


50,526.18 

479.85 
979.20 


1,459.05 

2,979.69 
a 16^ ^ 
26,888.21 


33,033.45 

618.15 
2,256.10 


2,874.25 

1,073.89 
7,634.72 


8,708.61 

680.80 
625.06 
5,479^63 


6,785.49 

64.66 
474.44 


539.10 


aoqoru^s 

' -UJ. jo 

ejsoo 


$1,915,056.28 

123,332.86 
8,559.86 
261,961.92 


393,854.64 

4,220.60 
7,206.61 


11,427.21 

33,006.89 
40,514.18 
378,254.96 


451,776.03 

3,260.15 
17,625.35 


20,885.50 

10,760.69 
59,706.52 


70,467.21 

10,083.36 
5,714.95 
55,024.55 


70,822.86 

1,349.85 
6,553.59 


7,903.44 


u o t nj, d n j ^ s 
-ui JO 
s^soo 
jaqiO 


$36,807.20 

2,167.64 
87.45 
t4,669.69 


t6,924.78 

6.00 
1.49 


7.49 

49.28 
94.62 
t8,440.55 


m cm oi 

Tp r-JOO 

tp ' d 

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154.53 


154.53 

15.00 
25.00 
fl,853.48 


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co ; o6 

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68.60 


uotpruis 

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$43,366.75 

2,368.47 
'56L46 
8,439.14 


11,369.07 

40.00 
627.62 


667.62 

693.18 
488.58 
6,068.96 


7,250.72 

110.42 
484.44 


594.86 

133.12 
448.33 


581.45 

109.43 
110.35 
1,395.44 


1,615.22 

10.00 
260.41 


270.41 


s^ooq^xaj, 


$44,632.36 

4,996.72 
519.38 
7,764.07 


13,280.17 

224.42 
156.09 


380.51 

168.43 
730.27 
5,828.26 


6,726.96 
978.30 


978.30 

168.89 
1,021.85 


1,190.74 

126.53 
125.60 
760.63 


1,012.76 

13.85 
- 65.38 


79.23 


^sjaqocaj, 
pus 
BlBdpauj 
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$1,790,249.97 

113,800.03 
7,391.57 
t241,089.02 


t362,280.62 

3,950.18 
6,421.41 


10,371.59 

32,096.00 
39,200.71 
t357,917.19 


f429,213.90 

3,149.61 
tl6,011.72 


tl9,161.33 

10,458.68 
58,081.81 


68,540.49 

9,832.40 
5,454.00 
t51,015.00 


t66,301.40 

1,326.00 
6.159.20 


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$91.75 

73.20 
112.65 
96.35 


87.68 

118.91 
157.86 


140.39 

53.02 
80.16 
84.01 


80.36 

49.06 
74.44 


68.75 

68.42 
108.64 


99.45 

77.39 
153.45 
106.88 


104.11 

106.49 
97.53 


98.94 


jaqDBaj, J3 d 


$1,853 

1,431 
1,848 
1,690 


1,601 

1,580 
1,784 


1,700 

1,845 
2,074 
2,108 


2,082 

1,211 
1,631 


1,543 

1,358 
1,497 


1,474 

1,612 
1,653 
1,602 


1,608 

1,459 
1,540 




suaqauaj, 
jo jaquinN 


966.2 

79.5 
4.0 
139.0 


222.5 

2.5 
3.6 


6.1 

17.4 
18.9 
167.3 


203.6 

2.6 
9.8 


12.4 

7.7 
38.8 


46.5 

6.1 

3.3 
29.5 


Oi fflO 
CO ' TP 
CO 


03 

TP 


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23,285 

2,055 
89 
3,232 


co coco 

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102 

630 
595 
4,785 


6,010 

76 
271 


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25,509 

2,248 
95 
3,483 


CD 00 CT> 

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107 

694 
645 
5,225 


6,564 

84 
291 


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County 


Total Counties . . . 

Allegany 
White: 

Grades 7-8 
Grade 9, Yr. I.. 
9-12, I-IV 

Total 


Colored: 
Grades 7-8 
9-12, I-IV , . . 

Total 


Baltimore 

White: 

Grade 7 


8, 8-9, I, I-II. . 
8-11, I-IV 

Total 


Colored: 


1-1 v 

Total 


Caroline 

Grade 7 


8-11. 1-1V. . . . 
Total 


Carroll 
White: 

Grade 7 


"i* rH 
3irH 

>oo6 


Total 


Colored: 

Grade 7 

8-11, I-IV 


Total 





Disbursements for Junior and Junior-Senior High Schools 223 



* 11.58 


11.53 

21,217.32 

130.45 
23,261.95 


44,609.72 
142.24 


142.24 
92,853.48 


92,853.48 


100.00 
234.50 
239^23 
289.30 


863.03 
20.95 


m t- os 
q eo eo 
d osos 

CO 00 OS 

t> rH 
rH CO* 


4,988.66 

184.00 
557.48 


741.48 
$161,795.77 


5,169.01 
27,280.56 


32,449.57 

209,402.02 
70,758.24 
174 659.70 
107',137!65 


561,957.61 

8,299.04 
16,826.62 


25,125.66 

5,378.33 
20,962.93 


26,341.26 

4,877.82 
33.193.47 


38,071.29 

121,138.70 
43,359.45 

100,141.61 
99',870.65 


364,510.41 

4,104.78 
5,697.08 


9,801.86 

1,664,762.22 
1,597,272.99 


3,262,035.21 

387,976.16 
287,889.49 


675,865.65 
$6,278,377.40 


371.79 
101.01 


472.80 

14,348.05 
119.98 
186!34 
2,997.91 


17,652.28 

1,523.66 
2,403.30 


3,926.96 

1,052.37 
2,640.08 


3,692.45 

1,020.79 
3,505.43 


4,526.22 

9,494.00 
2 431.84 
4)604.00 
11,486.31 


28,016.15 

395.92 
455.67 


851.49 
19,015.90 

91 ORfi 97 


40,102.17 

4,480.63 
5,674.17 


10,154.80 
$227,983.64 




224.89 
1,134.74 


1,359.63 

6,055.97 
1 541.25 
4^214!39 
1,595.70 


13,407.31 

150.83 
311.85 


462.68 

151.37 
130.07 


281.44 

340.56 
1,201.47 


1,542.03 

3,666.16 
350.84 
2,272^88 
1,053.20 


7,343.08 

98.06 
119.13 


217.19 

29,759.34 
9^ 441 09 


55,200.36 

6,830.88 
3,868.91 


10,699.79 
$123,081.15 


413.57 
3,499.74 


3,913.31 

19,252.71 
6,698.63 

17J09.10 
7,995.00 


51,055.44 

849.33 
1,755.99 


2,605.32 

726.34 
1,894.60 


2,620.94 

570.54 
2,012.59 


2,583.13 

9,470.49 
2,738.73 
5^932.76 
5,355.75 


23,497.73 

163.46 
147.13 


310.59 

184,052.69 
167,708.88 


351,761.57 

44,562,52 
27,277.58 


71,840.10 
$614,114.26 


4,158.76 
22,545.07 


26,703.83 

169,745.29 
62,398.38 

153,149.87 
94,549.04 


479,842.58 

5,775.22 
12,355.48 


18,130.70 

3,448.25 
16,298.18 


19,746.43 

2,945.93 
26,473.98 


29,419.91 

98,508.05 
37,838.04 
87,331.97 
81,975.39 


305,653.45 

3,447.34 
4,975.15 


8,422.49 

1,431,934.29 
1,383,036.82 


2,814,971.11 

332,102.13 
251,068.83 


583,170.96 
$5,313,198.35 


7.32 
107.54 


114.86 

7,159.51 
2 302.64 
3>84.85 
2,749.40 


15,996.40 

30.53 
63.13 


93.66 

10.00 
47.91 


57.91 

23.53 
180.23 


203.76 

301.70 
292.29 
1,039.47 
820.85 


2,454.31 

25.00 
76.96 


co m oo 
os in q 

rH O O 

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rH 

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eo oo t> 

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in oo 
in eo 
t-^ in 
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m q 
rH eo* 

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31.38 
600.74 


632.12 

4,113.31 
1,181.18 

3,552.22 
1,949.50 


10,796.21 

231.15 
364.60 


595.75 

163.25 
779.96 


943.21 

125.69 
863.48 


989.17 

2,228.82 
804.74 
2,296.22 
1,428.96 


6,758.74 

21.68 
280.52 


302.20 

20,008.27 
19,891.47 


39,899.74 

4,881.54 
3,829.80 


8,711.34 
$91,977.83 


1 

105.00 
657.53 


762.53 

4,334.89 
1,553.77 
3,444.49 
2,168.16 


11,501.31 

152.29 
240.21 


392.50 

75.00 
780.08 


855.08 

69.82 
749.16 


818.98 

2,752.86 
764.43 
1,562.61 
1,412.91 


6,492.81 

84.46 
76.02 


160.48 

18,918.96 
23,346.67 


42,265.63 

4,415.98 
5,612.16 


10,028.14 
$96,926.13 


4,015.06 
21,179.26 


25,194.32 

154,137.58 
57,360.79 
tl42,368.31 
t87,681.98 


t441,548.66 

5,361.25 
11,687.54 


17,048.79 

3,200.00 
14,690.23 


17,890.23 

2,726.89 
24,681.11 


27,408.00 

93,224.67 
35,976.58 
82,433.67 
78,312.67 


289,947.59 

3,316.20 
4,541.65 


7,857.85 

tl,361,806.51 
tl,306,368.60 


rH COO 

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49.23 
91.55 


80.52 

95.18 
100.80 
127.49 
132.27 


110.58 

61.93 
79.37 


72.62 

84.04 
142.60 


124.84 

52.45 
101.20 


90.43 

69.74 
89.77 
100.14 
116.13 


89.34 

83.77 
126.60 


104.28 

106.97 
148.57 


123.97 

89.27 
149.40 


107.74 
$108.07 


1,338 
1,629 


m os co os os 
c- oo m cc m 
in <x l „'"i l 


2,013 

L.675 
1,771 


L,740 

L,600 
L.632 


1,626 

L,363 
L,582 


C- t> t}< co oo 
m oeoc-o 
m t- os o oo 


L,875 

[,442 
L.817 


1,637 

2,137 
2,679 


2,373 

1,939 
2,815 


2,239 
$2,164 
















3.0 
13.0 


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217.5 

3.2 
6.6 


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11.0 

2.0 
15.6 


17.6 

54.6 
18.6 
39.7 
41.7 


154.6 

2.3 
2.5 


4.8 

624.9 
483.4 


1,108.3 

158.6 
82.5 


241.1 
2,315.6 


m 

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9,931 


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3,908 
1,788 


5,696 
53,126 


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15,563 
10,751 


26,314 

4,346 
1,927 


6,273 
58,096 




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224 1943 Report of Maryland State Department of Education 



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Disbursements for Colored Elementary and High Schools 



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428.8 
115.4 

242.7 
121.8 


364.5 
90.5 
29.4 

221.6 
204.7 
66.6 
53.1 


546.0 
149.9 
120.1 

302.9 
166.4 
36.9 
33.6 


539.8 
170.0 


No. of 
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$4,915.50 
3,570.50 
3,408.50 
2,253.00 
2,550.00 


$16,697.50 
2,998.50 

$5,502.50 
3,858.80 


$9,361.30 
3 , 683 . 50 
2,445.00 

$5,130.00 
4,350.00 
2,640.00 
1,500.00 


$13,620.00 
3,264.00 
2,475.00 

$4,687.50 
3,948.00 
2,670.00 
1,500.00 


$12,805.50 
4,608.00 


Current 
Expense 
Cost 
per 
PupU 


$144.38 
150.54 
151.85 
130.82 
136.23 


$143.57 
86.20 

$111.89 
121.61 


$115.16 
81.39 
147.03 

$119.42 
108.92 
153.76 
87.03 


$116.61 
70.09 
58.39 

$101.35 
116.02 
167.67 
124.08 


$111.94 
81.90 



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237 




INDEX 



A 

Academic course, each high school, 226-231 

Acceleration and adjustment of school pro- 
gram, 170-171, 175-176 

Adapting school program to wartime con- 
ditions, 163-172, 174-175 

Administration 
General control 

Cost per pupil, 117, 118 
Expenditures, 216 
Percent for, 114-115 
Superintendents, 148-159 

Adult education, 103-105, 107-110, 128, 131, 
132, 157-158 

Ages of boys and girls, school census 19 

Agriculture 

Adjustment to wartime conditions, 110, 

166-167, 170, 177-178 
Enrollment 

Colored, 59 

Each high school, 232-237 
White, 58, 64 
Evening schools, 104-105, 110 
Failures and withdrawals, white, 70 
Federal aid, 108, 128-130, 132 
Schools offering, 58, 71, 232-237 
Teachers, 71 
Aid from State and/or Federal funds to 
Counties and Baltimore 

Distributed by type of fund, 1942-43, 213 
1923-1943, 111-112 
1942-1943, 113-114, 196, 213 
State teachers colleges, 187-188, 196-197 
Vocational education, 128-132, 196, 198 

Training for war production, 108 
Vocational rehabilitation, 106, 196, 198 
Appropriations 

County, 1943-1944, 142-143 
County and State 
1923-1943, 111-112 
1942-1943, 113-114, 213, 214 
State, 1942-1943, 113-114, 196-198, 213 
1942-1945, 7-8 
Architect, consultant, 7, 196, 198 
Armed services, entrants into 
Pupils, 53-57, 170-171, 172 
Teachers, 10, 76-77, 152 
Art, white high schools 

Enrollment, 58, 66, 232-237 
Teachers of, 71 
Assessable basis, 13, 144-145 
Attendance 

Aggregate days of 209 
Average daily, 208 

Credit for work experience, 168-169, 177-178 

Effect of war on, 175, 176-181 

Index of elementary, 32 

Percent of, 30-33, 210 

Summer school pupils, 103, 176 

Teachers at summer school, 84 

Workers, 176-181, 211 



A — (Continued) 

Audiometer tests, 46 
Auxiliary agencies 

Cost per white pupil for, 120, 123 
Expenditures for 
Colored, 224, 225 
Total by purpose, 218 
White elementary, 220 
White high, 221 
Percent of current expense budget, 115-116 

B 

Bands, orchestras, glee clubs, 67 
Belonging, average number, 207 

Each high school, 226-231 

Per teacher, 85-90 

Proportion in high school, 29 
Birth rates, 28 

Board of Education, State, 2, 196, 198 

Rules to be filed, 12 
Bonds for schools, 11, 139 

Bonus for teachers, 5, 7, 8, 15, 154-156 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per white pupil 

Elementary, 120 

High, 123 

All schools, 217 

Colored, 224-225 

White elementary, 220 

White high, 221 
Percent of current expense budget, 115-116 
State aid for, 1942-1943, 213 
Boys and girls 
Enrollment 

By grade, 34 

Total, 200-201 
Census by age, 19 
Graduates 

Elementary school, 37, 38-39 

High school, 51-53, 53-57 
Non-promotions 

Elementary, 37, 40-45 
First grade, 43 

High school subjects, white pupils 

Each subject, 70 

One or more subjects, 68-69 
Budget (s) 

Local, county, and Baltimore City 

1923-1943, 111-112 

1942- 1943, 113-114 

1943- 1944, 142-143 

State public school, 7-8, 196-198 
State teachers colleges, 7, 196-197 
Buildings, grounds and equipment 
Cost, (see capital outlay) 
Number of, 199 

Value of school, per pupil, 140-141 
Buses and tires, 159 
By-laws re certification, 149-151 



238 



Index 



239 



C 

Capital outlay, school 

By year, 1923-1943, 111 

By sites, building, equipment, 219 

By types of schools, 138 

Colored, 224-225 

White elementary, 120, 220 

White high, 123, 221 
Census, 1942 school, 19-23 
Census and attendance fund, 7, 196, 213 
Certificates held by county teachers, 72-75 
Changes in requirements for, 8-9, 149-151 
Child care program, 160, 161-162, 179 
Child labor law, changes, 11 
Classes 

Evening school, 103-105, 108, 131 
Size of, 9, 85-90, 100-102 
Special for handicapped, 47, 48 
Summer school, Baltimore City, 103 
Clerks, county high schools, 72 
Clinics 181, 194, 195 
Colleges 

High school graduates 
of 1942 entering, 53-57 
of 1943 entering teachers colleges, 51-52, 
226-231 

State teachers, 182-189, 196, 197, 226-231 
Training teachers appointed in Maryland 

counties, 1942-1943, 81, 181 
White high school graduates of 1942 entering 

Maryland, 56 
Commercial subjects, white high schools 
Enrollment 

Each high school, 232-237 

Total and by county, 58, 65 
Failures and withdrawals, 70 
Schools having, 71, 232-237 
Teachers, 71 
Conference programs of 

Attendance Officers, 176-181 

High school principals, 171, 175-176 

Superintendents, 149-159 

Supervisors 

Colored, 174-176 

White elementary, 160 

White high, 162-172 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 98 
Schools closed by, 199 
Transportation of pupils, 133-137 
Coordinating welfare agencies, 11, 176, 180, 181 
Cost per pupil 

Analyzed for white elementary and high 

school pupils, 120, 123 
By types of schools, 118 

Colored elementary and high schools, 125-126 
General control, 117, 118 
Individual high schools, 226-231 
One-teacher schools, white, 118-121 
State teachers colleges, 187,189 
Transported, 133, 135 

White elementary and high schools, 117-123 



C — (Continued) 

Costs (see expenditures) 
Council of social agencies, 180, 181 
Courses in individual high schools, 232-237 
Crippled children, services for, 46, 195 
Current expenses 
Cost per pupil 

Colored, 125, 126 

Individual high schools, 226-231 

White elementary and high schools, 117-123 
Expenditures 

Colored, 224-225 

Total, 215 

White, 220-221 
Curriculum, redirection of, 163-171 

D 

Dates, opening and closing of schools, days in 

session, 24, 210 
Debt service 

1942- 1943, 139-140 

1943- 1944, 142-143 
Tax rate for, 146 

Dental clinics, 194 
Disbursements (see expenditures) 
Distributive education, 65, 104, 105, 128, 129 

E 

Employment of high school graduates, 51-57 
English, high school 

Adjustment to war conditions, 164-165 

Enrollment 
Colored, 59 

Each high school, 232-237 
White, 58, 60 
Failures and withdrawals, white, 70 
Schools offering, 71, 232-237 
Teachers, 71 
Enrollment 

Adult, 103-105, 108 
Elementary, 25-26, 34-36, 200-201 
Grade or year, 34-36 
High school 

Course, each school, 232-237 
Growth in, 25, 27, 124, 127 
Subjects 

Colored, 59 
Each school, 232-237 
White, 58, 60-67 
Year, 34-36 

Each school, 226-231 
White, 60 

Non-public, private and parochial schools, 

25, 202-206 
Public schools, 25-27, 34-36, 200-201 
State teachers colleges, 184-185 
Subject 

Colored high, 59 

Each high school, 232-237 

White high, 58, 60-67 
Summary, elementary and secondary, public 

and non-public, city and county, 25 



uo 



Index 



E — (Continued) 

(Enrollment (Continued) 
Summer schools, pupils, 103 
Total public schools, 200-201 
Equalization fund, 7-8, 113, 114, 213 
Equivalence examinations, 9, 172-173 
Evening schools and courses 
Enrollment, 103, 104, 108 
Expenditures, 108, 128, 131, 132, 218 
Expenditures, 215-225 

(See also general control, instruction, opera- 
tion, maintenance, auxiliary agencies, 
fixed charges, tuition to adjoining coun- 
ties, current expenses, debt service, 
capital outlay) 
Colored schools, 224-225 
Elementary schools, 220, 224 
Evening schools, 108, 131, 218 
Health, 194, 218 
High schools, 221, 225 

Junior and junior-senior hrgh schools, 

222-223 
Libraries, 218 
Salaries 

All schools, 217 

Colored high, 127, 225 

Elementary, 220, 224 

Vocational teachers, 128-130, 132 
White high, 124, 221 
State teachers colleges, 187, 18S, 196, 197 
Summer schools, 218 
Total, by major classifications, 215 
Transportation, 133, 134, 218 
Vocational work, Federal, 108, 128-132, 196, 

198 

F 

Failures (see non-promotions) 

Farm machinery, repair of, 108, 110, 166-167, 

170, 177-178 
Federal aid 

Federal Works Agency, 138, 213 

N. Y. A., to teachers college students, 188 

Vocational education, 196, 198 

Administration and supervision, 132 
Defense training, 108 
Salaries of teachers 

Baltimore City, 128, 132 
County day, 128, 129, 130 
County evening, 128, 131 
Training for war production, 108 
Financial statements 
County schools, 213-225 
State public schools, 196, 197, 198 
State teachers colleges, 196, 197 
First grade 

Enrollment, 34-35 
Non-promotions, 42, 43 
Fiscal year changed, 9 
Fixed charges, 218 
French 

Enrollment 



F — (Continued) 

Colored, 59 

Each high school, 232-237 

White, 58, 64 
Failures and withdrawals, white, 70 
Schools offering, 71, 232-237 
Teachers, 71 

G 

General control 

Cost per pupil, 117, 118 
Expenditures, 216 
Percent for, 115-116 
Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, 67 
Grade enrollment, non-promotions, 34, 42, 43 
Graduates 

Elementary school, 37-39, 49-51 
High school 

Entering teachers colleges, 51-56 
High school 

From each school, 226-231 
Inductees, 170-171 
Occupations of, 53-57 
Teachers colleges, 54, 56 
Growth in high school enrollment, teachers, 

and salaries, 124, 127 
Guidance, 71, 132, 162, 167, ISO, 181 

H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 46, 195, 196, 19S 

Home instruction, 46, 47 

Hospital schools 46 

Institutions for, 46, 176-177 

Opportunities for education of, 46-48, 160 

Receipts from State, 46, 213 

Services for crippled, 195 

Transportation, 46 
Hard-of -hearing children, 46, 48 
Health 

Activities of State Department of, 194-195 

Cost per pupil, 119, 120, 125 

Expenditures 

All schools, 218 

By county health offices, 194 

Programs for children, 160 194-195 
High school equivalence examinations, 9, 

172-173 
High schools 

Aid for, 157, 213 

Disbursements, 221, 222-223, 225 

Individual, 226-237 
Home economics 

Adjustment to war conditions, 158, 166 

Enrollment 
Colored, 59 

Each high school, 232-237 

White, 58, 64 
Evening schools, 103, 104, 105 
Federal aid, 128-132 
Schools having, 5S, 71, 232-237 
Teachers, 71 
Home instruction of pupils, 46, 47 



Index 



241 



I 

Immunizations, 195 

Incorporated towns, levy for, 143 

Index of school attendance, 32 

Industrial arts (see also trades and industries) 

Adjustment to war conditions 165-166, 170 

Enrollment 
Colored, 59 

Each high school, 232-237 

White, 58, 64 
Schools having, 71, 232-237 
Teachers, 71 
Instruction 

Cost per white pupil, 120, 123 
Expenditures 

Colored, 224-225 

Junior and junior-senior high, 222-223 
Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 217 
State teachers colleges, 187-189 
White elementary and high, 220-221 
Percent of current expense budget, 115-116 

J 

Junior and junior-senior high schools, 222-223 

Juvenile Court, 12, 177 

Juvenile delinquency, 176-177, 180 

K 

Kindergartens, enrollment, 34, 35, 36 

L 

Languages (see English, French, Latin) 
Latin, (see French) 

Legislation, 1943, 8-18, 149-152, 156, 157 
Length of session, 24, 210 
Levies, county, 142, 143 
Libraries 

Colored schools, 193 

Expenditures all schools, 218 

In wartime, 168 

Service from Library Advisory Commission, 
191-193 

Library Advisory Commission, service from, 
191-193 

Lip reading classes, 47, 48 

M 

Maintenance 

Cost per white pupil for, 120, 123 
Expenditures 

By type of repair, 218 

Colored, 224, 225 

White elementary, 220 

White high, 221 
Percent of current expense budget, 115, 116 
Materials of instruction and books 
Cost per white pupil for, 120, 123 
Expenditures 

Colored, 224, 225 

Total, 217 



M — (Continued) 

Materials, books, expenditures, (Cont. ) 
White elementary, 220 
White high, 221 
Percent of current expense budget, 115, 116 
State aid for, 213 
Mathematics, high school 
Enrollment 
Colored, 59 

Each high school, 232-237 
White, 58, 61 

Failui-es and withdrawals, white, 70 

In wartime, 163 

Schools having, 58, 71, 232-237 

Teachers, 71 
Medical examinations 

Pupils, 195 

Teachers, 152 
Men teachers, 81, 211, 212 
Mental hygiene, 181 

Mentally handicapped children, 47, 48 
Motor vehicle law changed, 10 
Music, high school 
Enrollment 
Colored, 59 

Each high school, 232-237 

White, 58, 66, 67 
Orchestras, bands, etc., 67 
Schools having, 71, 232-237 
Teachers, 71 

N 

N. Y. A., aid to State teachers college 

students, 188 
Night schools (see evening schools) 
Non-promotions, 37 

Colored elementary schools 37, 41, 42, 43, 45 
First grade, 43 
Subject, white high schools 
Each subject, 70 
One or more subjects, 68-69 
White elementary schools, 37, 40, 42, 43, 44 
Number belonging, 207 

Each high school, 226-231 
Per teacher, 85 
Colored, 88-89 
White elementary, 86, 144 
White high, 87 
Proportion in high school, 29 
Number of schools 

Having one teacher, 97, 98 
Non-public, 202-206 
Public, 199 

Elementary, 97 
High, 99-101 

o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 51-57 
One-teacher schools 

Decrease in, 98 

Number of 97, 98, 199 



242 



Index 



O— (Continued) 

One-teacher schools (Continued) 
White 

Capital outlay for, 138 

Cost per pupil, 118, 121 

Decrease in, 98 
Number belonging in, 98 

Per teacher, 85 
Percent of attendance, 31 
Salary per teacher in, 96 
Operation 

Cost per white pupil, 120, 123 

Expenditures 

By fuel, janitors' wages, supplies, 217 
Colored, 224, 225 
White elementary, 220 
White high, 221 
Percent of current expense budget, 115, 116 
Orchestras, bands, etc., 67 

P 

Parent-teacher associations, 147 
Parochial and private schools, 20, 25, 202-206 
Part-payment of salaries, 196, 213 
Persistence to high school graduation, 49-51 
Physical education and recreation 

Adjustment to meet war conditions, 156, 
165, 169-170, 171, 174 

Appropriation for, 196, 198 

High school enrollment 
Colored, 59 

Each high school, 232-237 
White, 58, 66 
Program, 156 

Schools offering, 71, 232-237 
Teachers, 71 
Testing program, 156 
Physical examinations (see medical examina- 
tions) 

Physically handicapped children, 46, 48 
Service for crippled children, 195 

Post-war planning and construction, 13 

Pre-induction courses, 63, 163-164 

Pre-kindergarten classes, 35 

Presidents of teachers colleges, 2, 186 

Private and parochial schools (see parochial 
and private schools) 

Programs of conferences (see conferences) 

Property, valuation of 
County and City, 144-145 
School, 140-141 

Public welfare agencies, relations with, 180, 
181 

Pupils 

Non-public schools, 20, 25, 202-206 
One-teacher schools, 97, 98, 

Per teacher, 9, 85-90, 157 
Public schools, 85, 86-89 

Enrollment, 20, 25-27, 157, 200-201 

Number attending, 208 

Number belonging, 207 



P— (Continued) 

Pupils, public schools, (Cont.) 
Percent of attendance, 210 
Reports on inductees, 172 
Transported, 133, 134, 136 

R 

Ration books distributed by teachers, 159 
Ratio of high school to total attending and 

belonging, 29 
Receipts from 
All sources, 214 
Federal Government, 213 

Evening schools, counties, 131 
Federal Works Agency, 138, 213 
N. Y. A., 188 

Teachers' salaries, counties, 128-130 
Vocational education, 128-132 
Baltimore City, 132 
War Production Training, 108 
Rosenwald fund, 193 
State 

Distributed by type of fund, 1942-1943, 
196, 213 

1923-1943, 111, 112 
Teachers colleges, 187-189, 196-197 
Total and percent, 113, 114 
Record card for elementary pupils, 148 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 157, 196, 198 
Repair of farm machinery, 108, 110, 166-167, 

170, 177-178 
Resignations of teachers, 76-77, 149, 152-154 
Retarded children, classes for, 47, 48, 160 
Retirement System, Teachers 
Financial statement, 196 
Members, 190 

Status of members in armed services, 10, 152 
Rosenwald fund, 193 

s 

Salaries 

Adjustment of, because of abnormal loss of 
teachers, 5, 7, 8, 154-156 

Attendance officers, 216 

Growth in high school, 124, 127 

Percent of school budget, 115, 116 

Superintendents, 148, 216 

Supervisors, 217 

Teachers 

Average per teacher, 90-96 
Cost per white pupil, 120, 123 

Total 

Colored elementary, 224 
Colored high, 127, 225 
Vocational, 129-132 
White elementary, 220 
White high, 124, 221 
Scholarships, 10, 158 

Scholastic credit for work experience, 178 
School census, 1942, 19-23 
Schools, number of, 199 



Index 



243 



S — (Continued) 

Science, high school 

Adjustment to wartime conditions, 163-164, 

176 
Enrollment 
Colored, 59 

Each high school, 232-237 
White, 58, 63 
Failures and withdrawals, white high schools 
70 

In wartime, 163-164 
Schools offering, 71, 232-237 
Teachers, 71 
Selective service, cooperation with, 156, 172 
Session, length of, 24, 210 
Sex of teachers, 81 
Sick leave, 12, 152 
Size of 

Classes, 9, 85-90, 157 
Schools 

Each high, 226-231 
Elementary, 97, 98 
High, 100-101 
Teaching staff, 148, 212 
Social studies 

Adjustment to war conditions, 160, 164-165 
Enrollment in high school 
Colored, 59 

Each high school, 232-237 
White, 59, 63 
Failures and withdrawals, white high schools, 
70 

High schools offering, 71, 232-237 

Teachers, 71 
Special classes for handicapped, 46, 48, 156 
Special high school teachers, 71, 226-231 
State 

Aid to health, 194, 213 
Aid to schools 

Showing various school funds, 196, 213 
1923-1943, 111, 112, 113, 114 
Board of Education, 2, 196, 198 
Department of Education, 2, 196, 19S 
Department of Health 
Expenditures, 194 
School activities, 194-195 
Public school budget, 7, 8 
Teachers colleges, 2, 51, 55, 56, 157-158, 182- 

189, 196, 198 
Teachers Retirement System, 2, 190, 196 
Statistical tables, 200-237 
Stenography, typewriting, bookkeeping, 65 
Subjects studied in high school 
Colored, 59 

Each high school, 232-237 

White, 58, 60-67 
Summer school attendance 

Pupils, 103, 176 

County teachers, 9, 84, 151 
Superintendents, 2, 148-159, 216 
Supervision, Supervisors 

Activities 



S — (Continued) 

Colored, 174-176 

White elementary, 159-160 

White high, 162-173 
Cost per white elementary pupil for, 120 
Cost, salaries, and expenses 

All schools, 217 

Colored, 224, 225 

White. 220, 221 
Curriculum revision, 163-178, 181 
Names of, white, 2. 3 
Number of, 159, 162, 174 

Percent of current expense budget, 115-1 K*.' 

T 

Taxable Basis, 144, 145 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 115-116 
Tax rates, county, 146 
Teachers (s) 

Academic, high school, 71, 226-231 
Certification of, 72-75, 149-151 
Colleges, 2, 8, 51, 52, 56, 176, 182-189 
Entering armed services, status of, 10, 152 
Number of, 211-212 

For each high school subject, 71 
In each high school, 226-231 
In schools of each type 

Colored, 97, 98, 102, 212, 224, 225 
Non-public schools, 202-206 
Public schools, 211-212 
White elementary, 97, 98, 220 
White high, 71, 100, 211, 221 
Number of White junior and junior- 
senior hiffh, 211, 222-223 
Total public school, 211-212 
Pupils per, 9, 85-90 
Resignations of, 76-77 

Salaries of, 90-96, 110, 113, 143-144, 154-156 
Sex of, 81, 195-196 
Sick leave, allowance for, 152 
Special high school, 71, 226-231 
Summer school attendance of, 84 
Turnover of, 78-80, 82-83, 143, 149, 150, 151, 
152-154 

Teachers' Retirement System 
Financial statement, 7, 196 
Staff, 2 

Status of members who enter armed services, 
10, 152 

Teachers' contribution to, 190 
Trades and industry, courses in 
Enrollment, day schools 

Colored, 59, 130, 132 

Each high school, 232-237 

White, 58, 129, 132 
Evening schools, 103, 104-105 
Federal aid, 128-132 
Schools having, 71, 232-237 
Training for war production, 107-110 
Trailer camps, adjusting pupils living in, 179- 

180 



244 



Index 



T— (Continued) 

Training centers, teachers colleges, 186 
Training for war production workers, 107-110 
Transportation of pupils, 133-137 
Cost, total and per pupil, 133-135 
Percent of pupils transported, 136 
Problems due to war conditions, 159 
Truancy from high school, 180 
Tuition charge, teachers colleges, 187, 188, 189 
Turnover in teaching staff, 78-80, 82-83. 149, 
152-154, 174 

V 

Value of 

Assessable property, 144-145 

School property, 140-141 
Victory Corps, 169-170, 176 
Victory and witholding tax. 158 
Vocational education 

Enrollment, day schools, 58, 59, 129, 130, 
232-237 



V— (Continued) 

Vocation Education, (Cont. ) 

Evening schools, 103, 104-105, 131 
Federal aid, 128-132, 196, 198, 213 
State aid, 7, 196, 198 

Training for war production workers, 107-110 
Vocational guidance, 71, 132, 167, 180, 181 
Vocational rehabilitation, 7, 106, 157, 196, 198 

w 

War effort, adjustment of schools to, 149-158, 

160. 163-173, 175-178, 179-180 
War emergency certificates, 72-75, 149-151 
War savings stamps, 159 
Withdrawals of pupils 

Elementary, 32 

High, 180 

Teachers colleges, freshmen, 186 
Work experience, high school credit for, 168- 
169, 177-178 

Y 

Year, length of school, 24, 210 



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